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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone powder coated their tank & fenders? I have a local metal company that will powder coat (black) the front, rear fender and gas tank for $150, including all preparation. To me, it sounds like an awesome deal. The only caveat is that I have the parts ready to be "washed". Meaning, bare metal. I was also told by several places that powder coat is much more resistant to chipping, scratches and won't peel from gasoline.

With this in mind, would you strip the paint with a chemical stripper or sand it down? I don't have access to sand or bead blasting equipment so I have to do it the old fashioned way. Yeah, I could pay to have it done but what's the point.

The powder coating guy told me a chemical stripper would be fine as it's acid washed and all chemical traces would be wiped out.

So I have a few questions.

1). Has anyone had their tins powder coated and how do you like it?
2). How would you remove the old paint?

Thanks
 

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hey we do this all the time. 150 is way cheap. what kind of finish are you getting, are you using it for a primer coat or the finished product,the reason i ask is alot of the time you get what you pay for. are they going to take out any dents or inperfections in the tins. we have never gotton a set of tins even new one that did not need some sort of body work(not dents so much as a wave that has to be worked out) our shop specializes in custom powder coating,and tanks and fenders get alot more special treatment than alot of other parts because if the tins don't look good and straight then nothing on the bike will look good. was black the color you wanted? check out our site and see some of the tanks and fenders that we have done www.gforcecoatings.com. to get a powder coated tank to look like the ones on our site there are many step involved to get the depth of the finish. that is a cheap price that is for sure. but be sure you know what you are getting. if you get any more ? about this i will be glad to try to help answer

steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Steve, thanks for the reply. From my conversation with the owner, he told they will put a base primer coat (powder) and a second top coat (powder) over my bare tins, after they "wash and etch" them. No body work done on their part, it's all up to me. No clear coat, also told it wasn't needed.

They charge $65 an hour to strip the old paint so he suggested that I do it before hand. He also mentioned that the only body filler that will withstand the high temp bake is "all metal".

I'll be going flat black, nothing fancy.

I didn't verify how many coats of black but assume it is only one. Two other places I called specified one coat is all that's needed. Is this correct or ... ? Do I need a top coat?

This isn't a body shop but a metal painting and powdercoating outfit. They do small jobs like mine on the side.

What questions should I ask the next time I call? Like the basics, what are the points that should be covered so I know the job will be done right?
 

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Ghetto Blaster
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coating tins

Everything covered in the previous reply was good advice. The coater you're describing sounds like the perfect guy to take your ornamental iron fence to...not too sure about your Harley Tins. As stated, you'll definitely need at least a primer coat to sand & block to get your metal straight. Many times the parts WILL need a High-Temp filler and sanding & "priming" to make it smooth.Are you going FLAT black or semi-gloss black. I wouldn't do it straight flat black, if it was me. Semi-gloss will probably look better longer and not hold onto stains (like bird crap) as much. Another source is Concept Powder Coating in So. Cal.They do OEM parts for Edelbrock, Big Bear Choppers, LA Choppers, and custom stuff for anybody who's anybody, as well as Joe Public. I'd be leery of paying $150 for such a job...not trying to slam them...it just sounds like this isn't their usual type of job. At Concept, It will undoubtedly cost more than $150, but it will look like it belongs on a custom harley, not a BBQ. Just my .02¢
 

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i agree the satin or semi gloss black would be my choice if it were mine. i am not tring to discourage anybody that can get a good deal from somebody but be sure that you have all of the info on what you are going to get in writting like if bodywork will be doneor what kind of finish like smooth, flat, satin, glossy, or even textured. powder does not act or go on like conventional auto paints. as far as questions to ask, ask to see some samples and make your mind up from what you see. at our shop if a customer wants to see a certain color, we will have a sample made to look at, if the cuatomer wants to see or has an idea of what color combonation they want on their parts we will make a sample on scrap sheet metal for them to look at. if the shop that you are dealing wuth cannot show you what you are getting then i would be hesitantto go in blind, because if you don't like it, more than likly you still going to have to pay for it if thats what you ordered. there is a differance between shootin a bbq grill and shooting the tins on a custom bike. and like i
said before you get what you pay for thats my 2 cents.

steve
 

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90 FXRS LOWRIDER
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a good paint remover is at auto zone.....aircraft remover is the product, just watch it. this is some seriously strong stuff. spray on, or get a gallon and brush it on. either way the stuff bubbles the paint and primer almost as soon as you put it on, then with a plastic spatula or plastic putty knife, scrape it off. i don't remember how to clean up, just make sure you put the tins on an old towel or something and throw it all away after removing paint.
get a good metal conditioner too to protect it from rusting. without, you will see rust form as you stand lookin at it. then get it too powder asap.

also thats a hell of a deal for your tins. but like everyone said, you get what you pay for. i just had my 90 fxrs frame, smingarm, motor mounts, tiple trees, lower shocks, and a fork brace done for $500 in gloss black. and i must say they turned out beautifully. i actually am debating on whether or not to have him PC my tins also. how bout some before and after pics if you do decide to do this.
 

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I had my tins powder coated after I got the frame back. It looks like OEM paint. Here's what we did on my 1975 XLH:
My tank was cracked and the fenders had some old bondo, so I bought all new sheetmetal. I worked out any imperfections such as die marks or dings and sanded out any scratches with a D/A sander. Your parts will be baked at around 400 degrees, so bondo is out of the question. I was told not to use lead or brass because the powder would not stick to it. Also beware of any chemical residue, as any impurities on the metal can cause small bubbles in the coating. One coat of color and TWO coats of clear polyester based powder were applied to fill any scratches and leave some material for finish sanding. After wet sanding and polishing, you can't tell it's powder coat. While I was at the shop, they showed me a tank that was coated in a dull industrial gray that was the base coat for an air brush job to make it look like steel plates riveted together. A clear coat (paint) was then applied to protect the artwork.
How durable? The three stooges (me, myself and I ) managed to knock the bike over in my garage about a month after it was finished. It fell against my mower and left a small scratch in only the clear coat on the front fender which I filled in with some clear nail polish. If that was paint, It would have been a gouge down to the metal. The only negatives are that the thickness of the coating can cause some headaches in reassembly, and you must remember to keep any harsh chemicals (like GUMOUT) away as it is a plastic resin you are dealing with. I did spill some gas on the tank a couple of times. One time I did not see the spill and did not wipe it off immediately. It sat in the hot sun for a few hours and left a faint yellow stain in the clear coat. One more issue to consider is if you want to coat the inside of the tank, it must be done after powdercoating. That stuff will burn right off during the baking process. It is tricky but I managed to do mine. It involved a lot of saran wrap and electrical tape.
Remember you can always paint over powder coating, but you can't powder coat over paint.

Good luck
 
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