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Discussion Starter #1
I do wish them luck with this. I had expected to see something like this long before now. My hopes had been that they would have come up with a non crotch rocket Buell.
While I maybe out side the market these bikes target, I am not saying down the road I would not pick one up.
Will these bikes seal the deal will they be the Non crotch rocket street bike they are represented to be?
Insurance should be lower on them, The 500 may well find a market in other countries.
It will be interesting to see what is done to them once a new owner get one home.
 

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I haven't seen your bird.
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Congratulations on posting the first thread in this new forum. Having come of age in the mid- to late-1960s, I rode a buddy's Triumph 500 (left-side shift) and a four-banger Honda 750. Both were fun to ride. Those days are long gone, but who knows what lies ahead with these new bikes.
 

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I do wish them luck with this. I had expected to see something like this long before now. My hopes had been that they would have come up with a non crotch rocket Buell.
While I maybe out side the market these bikes target, I am not saying down the road I would not pick one up.
Will these bikes seal the deal will they be the Non crotch rocket street bike they are represented to be?
Insurance should be lower on them, The 500 may well find a market in other countries.
It will be interesting to see what is done to them once a new owner get one home.
I was thinking. Oh boy just what we need. More foreign made products coming into our country.


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Originally posted by wkohn
I was thinking. Oh boy just what we need. More foreign made products coming into our country.
This has been covered in several different threads. The bikes destined for the American market will be manufactured in Kansas City.
 

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Yes, so I've read bikes destined for the American market will be made in U.S. but what does that say? Assembly of foreign made parts or truely American made?
 

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Friend works at the KC plant. (Tired of hearing this crap)

Frames: Bent and welded in KC.
Sheet metal: stamped in KC
Aluminum Castings: US Sourced
WHeels: Australia (HD owned Subsidiary)
Suspension: Showa
Cranks and any other iron/steel castings: India. (US Gov't has pretty much outlawed cast iron manufacture in this country.)
Fuel Injection: Marelli I believe
Wiring: US
Electronics: Aisia

India bikes use local castings, frames and sheet metal. We send them aluminum castings. They send us steel/Iron.

Basic design from Milwaukee. Prototypes in India. Initial Production in KC. These are 500ccs for RIder Training program. Job1 coming off the KC right about now.
 

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I think the Street series is the best thing I'e seen HD do in quite a while. I never understood why so many great mid-size cruiser type bikes were abandoned in favor of crotch rockets. Always seemed to me that the cruiser bikes were far more versatile.

I started riding in the 1970's and logged many hundreds of miles a day on Honda 350's and 450's. 750cc's was a big bike back then and perfectly suuitable for long distance travel. I can see the Street series bikes as re-introducing the fun of that to a new generation of riders. And I wonder if derivatives of these bikes will be the future of the MoCo in terms of larger displacement and larger frames.

As far as radiators go.....the folks that these bikes will appeal to don't have any problem with them. These are aimed at the next generation of Harley rider, not the present one.

Overall I'm fine with it and want to see one in person.
 

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I think the Street series is the best thing I'e seen HD do in quite a while. I never understood why so many great mid-size cruiser type bikes were abandoned in favor of crotch rockets. Always seemed to me that the cruiser bikes were far more versatile.

I started riding in the 1970's and logged many hundreds of miles a day on Honda 350's and 450's. 750cc's was a big bike back then and perfectly suuitable for long distance travel. I can see the Street series bikes as re-introducing the fun of that to a new generation of riders. And I wonder if derivatives of these bikes will be the future of the MoCo in terms of larger displacement and larger frames.

As far as radiators go.....the folks that these bikes will appeal to don't have any problem with them. These are aimed at the next generation of Harley rider, not the present one.

Overall I'm fine with it and want to see one in person.
Well-stated. Pooh-poohing the Street as some kind of "metric" is ignoring the fact that we've been riding bikes with a huge percentage of foreign-made content for decades. Mine's 25 years old, and has Showa forks & other foreign-made parts from the factory, as well as some of the aftermarket stuff I'd added or substituted.

I'm really looking forward to seeing one myself, riding one, and who knows from there? Sportsters are great (I've owned a couple, myself), but this 750 Street may be better at being a Sporty than the Sporty is. Not selling my old FXR, but adding a newer one? Maybe...

FWIW, I did a lot of miles on an old Honda CB750. It was good for literally everything.
 

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My first street bike was an 84 Honda Shadow with the 750cc motor. It was a fast ass bike for only a 750 . I hope Harley was paying attention because it looks very similar:blink:
I wish I could say the Honda was dependable but it wasn't, battery went dead because it was a PITA to start, fork seals blew every 5000 miles and the clutch wasn't strong enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
EPA and others have all but run manufacturing out of this country. Those they have not run off are regulated to the point they may as well be.
But what the heck many of yall voted for them driving your Toyota's and Honda.
HD has to compete in a world market they doing what they must.
I am waiting to hear some real reviews on the rides. I sure they will not be 100% honest no reviews are anymore. But and insight into the bike would be .
interesting .
90% of the Union bumpers stickers are on foreign cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I noticed here that while the Teachers Union is always screaming about Union they all driver BMW's ,Toyota's Kia not many US Union made cars.
In my home you will never see any Auto that was not made by a US owned company and made in a US Union plant.
I did after 43 years stop buying GM. And purchased my first Ford last month.
I Refuse to buy a Obama car.
However my so called Union brothers all buy what ever is cheapest they do not buy US Union made.
My Harley's may not be all US parts but as close as you are going to get.
 

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I wonder how many here that complain about foreign made parts on a Harley drive a Nissan/Toyota/Hyundai/on and on. Fess up.
You better read up on that. Camry has 80% U.S. (not north American) made parts, most of any car sold in the U.S. The top 10 are mostly Toyotas and Hondas. The list attached is for 2011 and the lists available are all over the place depending on what the list-maker factored in, but Japanese rule in this on all lists. There are a couple of big manufacturing concerns here in my part of the world that supply Toyota with lots of different machined aluminum and alloy parts. Needless to say we have a different take on American made.

I own three American made Toyotas, Camry, Avalon and Tundra.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2011/06/ranking-the-two-most-american-cars-are-from-japanese-makers/1#.Uotivn7na70
 

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Bs!

Friend works at the KC plant. (Tired of hearing this crap)

Frames: Bent and welded in KC.
Sheet metal: stamped in KC
Aluminum Castings: US Sourced
WHeels: Australia (HD owned Subsidiary)
Suspension: Showa
Cranks and any other iron/steel castings: India. (US Gov't has pretty much outlawed cast iron manufacture in this country.)
Fuel Injection: Marelli I believe
Wiring: US
Electronics: Aisia

India bikes use local castings, frames and sheet metal. We send them aluminum castings. They send us steel/Iron.

Basic design from Milwaukee. Prototypes in India. Initial Production in KC. These are 500ccs for RIder Training program. Job1 coming off the KC right about now.
The thing about cast iron not being here is total bull sh!t. I worked in a foundry in Ohio that cast iron & there's a state of the art foundry here in my home town that cast iron & has the tools to machine a simple crank or any other motorcycle part. They are made in India because it's cheaper period.
 

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You better read up on that. Camry has 80% U.S. (not north American) made parts, most of any car sold in the U.S. The top 10 are mostly Toyotas and Hondas. The list attached is for 2011 and the lists available are all over the place depending on what the list-maker factored in, but Japanese rule in this on all lists. There are a couple of big manufacturing concerns here in my part of the world that supply Toyota with lots of different machined aluminum and alloy parts. Needless to say we have a different take on American made.

I own three American made Toyotas, Camry, Avalon and Tundra.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2011/06/ranking-the-two-most-american-cars-are-from-japanese-makers/1#.Uotivn7na70
Here's a good article about the Japanese bringing Japanese suppliers with them to support "American made" cars. Sure they employ Americans but are owned by the Japanese.

I worked at a factory that supplied Ford and GM with front end suspension parts and at the time we were nearly a 100% supplier. Toyota was interested in us making their parts and toured the plant (8 plus acres in size) We were told to hide all prints, dies and header progressions because that will copy and steal our way of producing. They decided they would do business with us...if we used their steel and tooling sent over from Japan. The tooling was incorrectly made and the steel was defective, imagine that. Cost us a fortune in R&D just to fail by design. They went with a supplier that also imported over here from Japan...again imagine that. I'll never forget their way of doing business and the way they treated us on visits.

That's my first hand experience with Japanese "made in America" claims. Take it or leave it.
 

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I think the new 500 and 700 size will do well here. I do drive a Toyota FJ Cruiser and the wife a new Toyota Avalon. The Avalon is one of the most American built cars here in the US. I also have a Buell and it is by far one of the most fun bikes in my 41 years of riding. I will always feel The Company dropped the ball big time cutting Erik loose.

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I think the new 500 and 700 size will do well here. I do drive a Toyota FJ Cruiser and the wife a new Toyota Avalon. The Avalon is one of the most American built cars here in the US. I also have a Buell and it is by far one of the most fun bikes in my 41 years of riding. I will always feel The Company dropped the ball big time cutting Erik loose.

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Yes it is the most American built. I wonder how much is American made?
 

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Does anyone know what the new bikes will look like yet? I too am very interested in seeing how everything plays out.

if they're already taking orders, do you have any clue how much it'll be? Features and what not..?
 
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