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· ORIGINAL DOOF BABE
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Ah, WINTERIZING!! Used to have to do that when I lived up in Michigan (there's a reason it's shaped like a mitten and a scarf...)

I used to fill the gas tank, put in some stabilizer, change the oil, put her on something so the tires were off the cement, pull the battery, then spray the shiny parts with WD-40 to keep 'em from rusting or pitting.

Then I'd stuff some rags in the pipes to keep any critters out, and cover her up for the long, cold winter (or until Bike Week).

Of course, you've gotta wash all the goo off before ya ride, but as mentioned in previous posts, most of the time there's too much salt on the roads to get her out until Spring anyway.

BUT...now I don't have to worry about ANY of that, since I live in Hilton Head Island SC where you can ride year round!!!! All I have to say now is F*CK MICHIGAN!!!!! :p :D
 

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Winter Storage

If your bike is going to be off the road for an extended period (more than a month or two) its best to fully prepare the bike for storage.

1) Give the bike a thorough cleaning.
2) Change the oil and filter. You do this so that the acidic combustion by-products that build up in the oil do not corrode the insides of the engine.
3) Remove the spark plugs and squirt a couple of drops of oil in each plug hole. Then replace the plugs and torque to spec.
4) Check your anti-freeze with a specific gravity tester. They are sold at most auto supply stores - only cost a few $. (Whoops - this only applies to us V-Rod owners...)
5) Remove the battery. If the battery is going to be stored in a warm place (i.e. inside your house) you will need to put it on a trickle charger once a month. If you store it in an unheated garage, every two months is probably fine. DO NOT store the battery sitting on a concrete floor - it will be destroyed.
6) If the bike is going to be sitting for more than three months, put it on blocks under the frame to get the wheels off the floor to prevent the tires from developing flat spots.
7) Either completely drain the fuel tank, or fill it up completely with gas and add fuel stabilizer. You want to prevent condensation from forming in the gas tank and rusting it out from the inside. Opinions vary on the best practice - probably filling the tank to the top is the easiest - but then you will probably want to drain and dispose of the "old" gas come springtime.
8) You may want to apply a light mist coat of WD-40 to any untreated metal surfaces to prevent surface rust or pitting. Aluminum wheels should be cleaned and given a coat of Harley Glaze or other protectant.
9) If you cover your bike, make sure that the cover is a breathable fabric such as canvas - a plastic tarp or drop cloth will cause condensation to form, ruining your bikes finish.
10) Make sure that there are no electric motors running continuously in your storage area (i.e. garage refrigerators are a good example). Electric motors create ozone, which will quickly destroy any rubber parts on your bike.
 

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Up here in the far north, it gets cold and stays cold for a while so many of us choose to park our bikes for a few months in the winter.

In addition to the tips already posted in this thread, I was advised by the dealer to remove the air cleaner, start the bike, and spray fogging oil in the carb until it shuts off. Then to remove the plugs and spray some fogging oil in each cylinder and to spin the starter before replacing the plugs. Is that a good idea?

Also, some have suggested running the carb dry or draining the float bowls. Is that necessary if stabilizer has been added to the gas tank?

Thanks . . .
 

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Oiling the cylinder walls is not a bad idea. Makes that first start-up in the spring less traumatic. Just do it outside 'cause it'll smoke up a storm for about half a minute. And yes, always drain the float bowl, stabilizer or not. The small amount in the bowl WILL evaporate leaving deposits otherwise.

Dean
 

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Fogging oil is a petroleum product with a 'high ambient vapor pressure". That is, it remains in the gas phase much better then standard lubricating oils. Since it is in more readily dispersed, it will do a much better job of coating the inside of your engine. You should be able to find it at any automotive parts house, or any marina. I use the stuff in my boat every year. I also use an old set of sparkplugs which I clean & start the engine in the spring, once all oil is burnt off, I replace the plugs with new ones for the season. I don't use it on my bike since i don't normally put it up that long
 

· IronButthead
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Lady Godiva said:
Ah, WINTERIZING!! Used to have to do that when I lived up in Michigan (there's a reason it's shaped like a mitten and a scarf...)

... All I have to say now is F*CK MICHIGAN!!!!! :p :D
I spent 9 years in the mitten part ! Amen to F**K Michigan! If I ever hear "wind chill of minus 43" again, it better be 'cause I'm on an awesome ski vacation! Livin' in that'll kill ya...or at least kill your spirit!
 

· ORIGINAL DOOF BABE
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Yeah - the scenery's great if you can avoid all the f*cking tourists and idiot drivers here.

Truly, you're taking your life in your hands EVERY time you take your bike out here on the island. It's a big concern. I thought Michigan drivers were bad, but they're NOTHING compared to down here.

Goes with the tourist thing - no one knows where they're going, they're looking for a certain place, not paying attention, making quick lane changes and turns, slamming on brakes, etc. ARRRRGGHH!!

It's a nightmare! I'm just glad though that I don't have to winterize and can ride throughout the season - what a treat!! 'Specially since it's gonna be December before I get clearance from the doc that my arm is up to handling my big Milwaukee Vibrator!! :)
 
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