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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking about replacing my wheel bearings. I see harley has a special tool to install and remove. Anybody have a idea so i don't have to drop 150 or so on a tool?? Also what is the actual bearing number on the side? I would look to see where i could get one for less that the $30 list price. I would think its a 10 dollar or so cost.
Thanks
Paul
 

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"I am thinking about replacing my wheel bearings"...

:hmmm: ...Why? If they are bad you shouldn't be "thinking about" it {just do it}, and if they are OK...why think about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
actually its on an hub of unknown miles and treatment, they feel ok but then again i don't know the history of the wheel.
 

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If they feel OK, no slop/play and don't "rumble" when the are torqued to spec, ride it.

I use a long screw driver or a rod, placed on the end of the axle to "listen" to them while rotating the wheel.

Can't help with the special tool{s} :dunno:
 

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fatbillscustoms
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Special tool

I use a special tool from Jim's - about $200. I won't change a bearing unless it IS bad. If you have the wheel off the bike - just take it down to HD and have them replace the bearings. Much less than buying the tool. Bad bearing are not always easy to remove. Take a picture of the wheel before you go. Much easier to get a new wheel when you get it back. Trust me on this.
 

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I understand your thoughts about changing them, Shrike. Who wants to encounter troubles in Deliverence County when they're 2,000 miles from home. A weekend rider that's rarely more than an hour away has a lot more chances of noticing a future mechanical failure.

I wish they had preventive maintainance charts like automobiles. "Replace the oxygen sensor at 60K, the timing belt at 100K, etc." On bikes the usual guidline is "You can tell when it's about to go". I don't like getting that close when I'm riding across this country.

The bearings should be repacked(greased) each time a new tire replaces an old. It seems like very few people do it. Because of this some bearings are closer to mechanical failure than others.

I replaced my main bike's 20-year-old bearings at 60K. It may not have needed it, but it's one less thing to worry about. Next replacement shouldn't occur until 2024. I can handle that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good point on taking a picture of the wheel before you take it in for replacement. Never thought of that but your right on that matter.

Ka Ka I am the kinda guy who dosen't mind doing preventive stuff on my schedule, nothing worse than going down away from home no matter the distance. The bearing itself is cheap, i think i could get them for less than 15 each. Its really the damn tool you need to pull them and replace. The stealer certainly is not going to give me a break since list price is close to 30 each.

I guess i'll try and make my own puller and install tool. I actually think a blind bearing puller will remove them, just need to fab something to install.
 

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jgi-47519 -83-A This number is the # on the bearing seal of my 1999 glide- I know this is a standard size and you can probably get this at a NAPA-The parts guy can (I think) cross ref this to the bearing. As for special tools-I don't know about sealed bearings, but I used to use a 3/8 extension to tap them out from the back and a deep well socket to tap the new ones in from the front-If the bearings :thumbsup: are repacked every time you change the tire they will probably never go bad- I've been riding since early 1965 and have never had a bad wheel bearing-Al
 

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Tried Sears?

Just this morning I asked the parts guy for a price quote on a HD bearing puller tool. He suggested I look at Sears as they are selling more MC tools these days and it would be less than what the dealer would charge for the tool. I haven't checked yet but at least its a place to start.
 

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Ka-Ka said:
I understand your thoughts about changing them, Shrike. Who wants to encounter troubles in Deliverence County when they're 2,000 miles from home.

I agree! that said I'd look into a sealed bearing like the 2000 and later bikes have if possible.
No more packing and they last 100,000 miles.
My 2000 EG classic has seen all kinds of rain and cold as well as temps in the 115 to 120 range with high speed dashes accross the desert in the extreme heat.
I had the bearings replaced at my 90,000 mile service just to be safe and they showed no sign of failure or wear.
 
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