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The best way to reduce the perceived heat from the bike is to use a 2 into 1 exhaust. The stock headpipes are a heat sink.

Moderately built engines run cooler then stock ones.
 

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Don't know what to tell you other then the state of tune of the bike makes a huge difference.

I rode a 99 Road King for over 50K and now a 02 Road Glide for over 10K in Phoenix. It is often over 110F here, distances are long and if you ride under 85 you get run over.

Don't run oil coolers and the bikes never feel like they are running hot unless you have to idle for long periods of time, and even then they cool right back down the instant you start moving.

It actually is of so little concern I haven't even considered a temp gauge. The 02 has a heat management system in the ECM and I'm certain it has never engaged.
 

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Hippo, what would signal a rider if the heat management system of the ECM did engage?
It kicks in in phases. First it lowers the idle speed, then it richens the fuel mixture and then it starts to cut out injector pulses.

Some time ago we forced a bike into this mode just to see how it felt. The drop in idle is noticeable, then the bike changes sound and eventually it starts to feel like it is missing. When we tried it we used an infrared pyrometer to get an idea as far as when it happened. It seems to start to happen a little over 300F. Keep in mind this is cylinder head temperature and not oil temperature.
You would think this is triggered from the ETS, so it is conceivable that if you have an out of spec ETS the bike will not only have the wrong fuel mixture but could either engage the heat control too soon or fail to engage it.
Strange thing is that as sensitive to codes as these bikes are, a out of spec (as opposed to failed) sensor will not set a code. But it takes only 5 or 10 minutes to check.



With the dealer saying the bike is fine Harley is flying someone out next week to haul it off and play with it
Let us know what they come up with.
 

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Two schools of thought on that one.
The factory claims removing the air dam helps cool the engine.

There are a lot of people that don't agree. It would seem that removing the air dam reduces the perception of heat as it allows more turbulent air to reach the rider, but the engine itself actually runs a bit cooler with the dam in place.

Hard to say, but I kept the one off my old RoadKing, LOL.
 

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As far as the mapping, yes, I would say a proper fuel map will help, just like a different exhaust will, but different exhaust means different head pipes.

The stage1 is probably not the answer, you might be better off building your own map.

If you have a bike that runs exceptionally hot like johnb seems to have, if nothing is found by the factory people, you may want to remove the Y pipe and take a look at it. They all have some protrusion in the weld, but if you have one that's worse then usual the rear cylinder will run very hot due to being choked to death. If you now consider the ECM reads engine temp from the front head it isn't all that hard to see how small things compound problems.
Generally you make gains by the cummulative effect of a number of small changes more then by one radical change unless there is a problem.
 
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