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OLDBOY
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help!!! I just swapped the front wheel on my Heritage to a Hallcraft 80 Radial Spoke wheel. The trouble is the valve stem is too close to the spokes to fit a tire gauge or the fill nozzle (or even a valve stem cap)!

Does anyone know of an adaptor that will allow me to fill and test the tire pressure?



 

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How did you manage to air it up to start with? Seems the head of the airvalve would be bigger than a valve cap or extension. Perhaps you need a rubber valve stem so it can be 'encouraged to the side a bit. Not as shiney but at least you could service you tire when needed.
Rocket
 

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Infidel
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Greglal said:
Help!!! I just swapped the front wheel on my Heritage to a Hallcraft 80 Radial Spoke wheel.
You should do a search on "Hallcraft" and read some of the horror stories your fellow VTF members have had with Hallcraft spoke wheels.

Good luck, you're gonna need it.
 

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OLDBOY
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wyodude said:
You should do a search on "Hallcraft" and read some of the horror stories your fellow VTF members have had with Hallcraft spoke wheels.

Good luck, you're gonna need it.
Yeah I'm farmiliar with Hallcraft and other Radial Spoke problems. That's why I'm only using a Radial spoke in the front. I dont trust the Radial spoke to handle the torque in the rear. From what I understand all the failures of have heard about with the Hallcraft, American Wire, Fat Daddy, etc. radials have been on the rear. At least I hope that holds true. :p
 

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You may have seen my horror story in that earlier post and yes, it was also the front wheel! These wheels are for show only in my opinion. Radial spokes are not real cool. They don't transfer load well, and on my bike I want something that is going to be transfering well on both ends.
I used to road race bicycles for 14 years. I had a German guy named Rolf Detrich as my mechanic on my team and he was successful in making low spoke count wheels work but we experimented for 3-4 years to find the right combination. His wheels were used by Lance Armstrong in the Tour de France. He built a special bike to road test wheels on and had many failures all with radial spokes. His final design was a 6 spoke wheel. A normal bicycle wheel has 36 spokes.
When you look at the Hallcraft 80 spoke wheel and figure it is not safe with over twice the spokes in it a normal wheel uses, and you look at the thick-assed spokes, you can see that it is a design that is never going to work well or long. The hub flanges are too small, the spokes don't cross(crossing the spokes makes for more triangles as the groups of spokes go from hub to rim, and triangles are strong), and the spokes are laced all the same way-meaning the heads of the spokes all are facing the same way. Hope this helps. Friday www.dyno-power.com
 

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Friday1,
You've successfully made me nervous about riding these now........



Should I be "tinkling" the spokes before flight every time now?
 

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I've emailed Ride Wright to provide failure information on their radial Fat Daddys to see what they say about the inherent unsafe design.
 

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Pre-flight check

On the particular bike I found problems with, I first noticed that the wheels had alot of rusty powder on them. I grabbed the rear belt sprocket and turned it like a steering wheel to the left and right and it turned about 10-15 degrees in either direction! There should be no movement. The front was also loose but not that loose. The front can be checked by trying to turn the brake disc. Most of the rust was from the holes in the hub being oblonged from riding with the spoke heads banging aroound in a once round hole. I tried to tighten the spokes but when you move the nipple, it breaks the vulcanized seal on the inside of the rim that makes these wheels tubeless. Then you have an instant flat tire! Now you can send it back to the manufacturer who will true it and revulcanize the spoke nipples to the rim or install a tube. Eighty fat spokes is a unique look for sure, but if you can accomplish the same thing with say 36 skinny spokes that cross each other 3 times from the hub to the rim, it has to be a better design. Hope this helps, Friday
 

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Greglal said:
Yeah I'm farmiliar with Hallcraft and other Radial Spoke problems. That's why I'm only using a Radial spoke in the front. I dont trust the Radial spoke to handle the torque in the rear. From what I understand all the failures of have heard about with the Hallcraft, American Wire, Fat Daddy, etc. radials have been on the rear. At least I hope that holds true. :p
how much torque do you thing is applied to the front when braking?
 

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Here's the response from Ride Wright...........

good morning,
first and most of all, thank you for purchasing our product.

second, if you can gather all your friends that are causing the concern for you and tell them, and get on the web site, go to 50 spoke, read the testimonial from Valerie Thompson a drag racer that has had my Fat Daddy wheels on her Fat Boy for five years drag racing and has had no problems.

third, please inform your freinds that they need to get their story correct.
the radial spoke that had problems are copied by another company who had made them as follows:

they made them out of plain steel spokes, and chromed them were it made them more weak and fragile due to the chroming process and the chemicals and they made the wheels with forty spokes only. steel and aluminum do not play together nicely and the thickness of the spoke was less than what we use.

we made these wheels for over 10 years and have had very good success with them. we have made them for Drag Specialties all these years and had no problems at all. we use s.s. spokes, we use thread locking loctite and we roll the threads on the spokes. we thread the s.s. into the aluminim hub 3/4" and use loctite. the nipples are 1" and 1 1/8" and tightend to 150ftlb of torque.

here at the shop, we have had these wheels on a commuting road king and fat boy for over three years of daily use and abuse, doing burning rubber donuts, etc. with speeds on a regular basis of 120mph and have not had a single issue.

so please get your friends to understand what really happened and educate them because it is not fair for you or me.

if you have any more concerns or questions please advise.
sam
So, that's their side of the story.
 

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OLDBOY
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The other mfg wheels they are referring to in that statement are the discontinued American Wire Wheels "SuperSpokes". Even the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration investigated the “SuperSpoke” wheel design. The case was closed with no official declaration of defect but there had been multiple reports of failure. You can read the American Wire Wheel press release here.

There are many bikes running the radial spokes both front and rear without problems, however, all radial spokes are suspect due to the design and many different mfgs models have had failures. If you run radial spokes you should be made aware of the issues and should check them regularly IMHO.
 

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By the way, not to distract the discussion away from radial spoke designs but I have seen conventionally laced wheels collapse too. I would suspect from neglect but still, any spoke wheel can have a problem. Now that I own the radials and see it up close, I can understand that they probably are a flimsier house of cards than conventional spokes. I would also guess that poorly executed billet wheels, for the sake of aesthetics, can fail too.

Thanks to you all! I will inspect these new wheels carefully and especially as they age.
 

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Sounds like Fat Daddy has got a handle on the radial spoked wheel. Wheels are easy to overlook when you take your bike out. I guess we all take them for granted, and it is easy to just hop on and go. Spoked wheels of any configuration should be inspected closely on a regular basis. A bike will show some poor handling for a while before a failure in most, but not all cases. If it feels like it is squirelly, there is a reason. An easy inspection and trying to turn the sprocket or brake disc with the tire on the ground may save your life! Friday
 
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