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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To the point, what is the best way to strap down a bike on a trailer using a Condor Wheel Chock?]

I need to transport the bike about an hour away and, obviously, don't want it to move, fall come loose or anything else, and have never towed/transported a bike before - always ridden them :)
 

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You will probably get a few different answers from folks who have their own special way of doing things.
It depends on what type of trailer you are using and where the anchor points are. You have a wheel chock, so you bike will probably be in the upright position as opposed to being on the kickstand. Fore and aft anchor points are the best as stated above. I like to compress the front suspension, I see nothing wrong with this method, only be sure release each side in small increments so as not to inadvertantly tip it over. But there are many different ways to secure the bike, just think it through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I will be using an 8' x 5' standard trailer (timber deck) with sunken D Ring tie down points in each corner and, with any luck, a wheel chock; although, haven't decided on which one yet.

If I get a wheel chock the obvious is to use tie downs to pull the bike forward, into the wheel chock at both the front and rear of the bike.

I guess what I really meant was where is it recommended for the tie down straps to be attached to the bike. My plan is to use Ratchet Tie Down Straps unless anyone sees a huge problem with that.
 

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Well, I will be using an 8' x 5' standard trailer (timber deck) with sunken D Ring tie down points in each corner and, with any luck, a wheel chock; although, haven't decided on which one yet.

If I get a wheel chock the obvious is to use tie downs to pull the bike forward, into the wheel chock at both the front and rear of the bike.

I guess what I really meant was where is it recommended for the tie down straps to be attached to the bike. My plan is to use Ratchet Tie Down Straps unless anyone sees a huge problem with that.
I don't compress my suspension, you can blow out a seal. The condor chock is a great chock, on the front put your straps out in front of the bike and out to the side a bit, on my bike a take a ratchet strap with a soft tie down and wrap it around me rim, the bike doesn't move. I haul a sgs and heritage or fatboy on a 6.5 x 10 foot trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am pretty much convinced to get the Condor but am leaning toward this one:

Rectangle Font Auto part Gas Automotive exterior


A little cheaper than the Pit Stop version but I won't be putting the bike on a trailer all that often - hopefully.
 

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The problem with using the suspension is unless you compress it completely, which is a no no, the first big bounce will. And then you can lose a strap. Ask me how I know. Squish the tires and let the suspension ride.
 

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For a fraction of the cost of the Condor you can rent a U-Haul motorcycle trailer for the day. $20-$25 a day.

They have a built in “wheel chock” so it is easy-peasey. Two sizes…… one is motorcycle specific & and I think a 5x9 with larger tires. Both have fold down ramps.

if you do the 5x9 ask about the wheel chock because their newer trailers have them , but not all of their older inventory.

All of their motorcycles specific trailers have the built in wheel chock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Never thought about U Haul but they are certainly an option and something to think about ...... :)
 

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For a fraction of the cost of the Condor you can rent a U-Haul motorcycle trailer for the day. $20-$25 a day.

They have a built in “wheel chock” so it is easy-peasey. Two sizes…… one is motorcycle specific & and I think a 5x9 with larger tires. Both have fold down ramps.

if you do the 5x9 ask about the wheel chock because their newer trailers have them , but not all of their older inventory.

All of their motorcycles specific trailers have the built in wheel chock.
I have done this several times, and it works very well.
 

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Well, I will be using an 8' x 5' standard trailer (timber deck) with sunken D Ring tie down points in each corner and, with any luck, a wheel chock; although, haven't decided on which one yet.

If I get a wheel chock the obvious is to use tie downs to pull the bike forward, into the wheel chock at both the front and rear of the bike.

I guess what I really meant was where is it recommended for the tie down straps to be attached to the bike. My plan is to use Ratchet Tie Down Straps unless anyone sees a huge problem with that.
Around the forks just above the fender mounts for the front, and a low mount point to the trailer or truck bed; it will allow you to hold the front straight and tight, and won't put strain on your front fork seals by compressing the forks. Jiffy stand down always just for grins or if you let the straps slip while you're getting it more upright.

For the rear, you're really just preventing any side hop and a few lbs of pressure on takeoffs, so just anything through the rim and around the tire to the sides of the trailer will do. I've hauled bikes faster than I should with no issues, except that time a guy flagged me down to tell me my bike was bouncing (because he could see the free movement of the shocks as I rode).

Safe travels.
 

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Everyone has their own way to tie down a bike. The one thing I ALWAYS here when a bike falls over or comes loose is "I guess I should have put another strap on it." SO my advise is always if you have X straps use X straps. "extra" straps left in the toolbox and not on the bike do you no good. (I always use at least 4) One at each corner. 2 pulling forward and 2 pulling back.
 

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Everyone has their own way to tie down a bike. The one thing I ALWAYS here when a bike falls over or comes loose is "I guess I should have put another strap on it." SO my advise is always if you have X straps use X straps. "extra" straps left in the toolbox and not on the bike do you no good. (I always use at least 4) One at each corner. 2 pulling forward and 2 pulling back.
I concur. But I always use 6. After bike is secure with 4 ratchet straps I put 2 extra on the front just snug in case one lets go for some unseen reason. I always compress the suspension. I been hauling bikes this way since 1985 to and from Sturgis, Daytona and other places. Had a towing business for 10 yeas also. Hauled 100's of bikes 10's of thousands of miles. Never seen a fork seal blow out. In my opinion that just don't happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all of the input - appreciate it.
 

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I concur. But I always use 6. After bike is secure with 4 ratchet straps I put 2 extra on the front just snug in case one lets go for some unseen reason. I always compress the suspension. I been hauling bikes this way since 1985 to and from Sturgis, Daytona and other places. Had a towing business for 10 yeas also. Hauled 100's of bikes 10's of thousands of miles. Never seen a fork seal blow out. In my opinion that just don't happen.
It does happen, a friend had his blow out while towing his to the Dell's in Wisconsin, I don't know how often it happens but it can happen.
 

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Transported 2 Bikes with Condor Pitstops. Approx. 1400 miles. Really well made. Placed the Condor against the Ryder front wall and strapped the rear towards the front using the side rails. I screwed the Condor into the wooden floor.

Checked the ratchet straps if loosened up every gas stop. Everything good to go.
 

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It does happen, a friend had his blow out while towing his to the Dell's in Wisconsin, I don't know how often it happens but it can happen.
I would say there was an underlying problem before the bike was transported and it showed after being tied down. But that's my two cents. I have been listening to this argument for 38 years. It's kind of like an oil thread.
Then there is the people who tie them down on the kickstand and I alway just shake my head, why would you put that stress on your frame is beyond me. I did it once in an emergency wife's springer broke down and someone in a pickup gave us a lift and we only had rope to tie it down. But we only went 20 miles.
I also know guys who strap there two knucklehead choppers down with three cam lock straps. One to tie the two handlebars together and one on the outside of each bike.
 
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