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Hi everyone, I am leaving for Canada next week and decided to trailer up my 01 FLHT. I want to ride Nova Scotia and PEI. We have family in NB and will use this as homebase. This is the first time I am hauling the bike on a trailer. I have a MYCO Stowaway single and it appears to be a well built trailer. I purchased ratcheting tie down straps and will secure the front of the bike by the handlebars. Not sure where I am going to connect on the rear. It appears I will have to remove the saddlebags and stow them in the SUV. The only place I see is passenger handles as a connection point for the rear. If anyone has any suggestions or tips I would be interested in hearing them.
Also, I was wondering if I am going to get hassled at the border. I have all my paperwork in order I believe including Canada insurance cards for both SUV and bike. Is there anything special the border officials will need to see??
Thanks
Dave
 

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They might want to see the handguns you've got tucked away -- HA!
Sorry couldn't help myself -- it sounds like you've got a well thought out plan. Hope somebody jumps in to offer tips on your trailer. I've never trailer'd a bike. Good luck and hope you have a safe trip.

PS: Watch out for the Moose when you're out there on your bike.
 

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Given a choice I would not use the bars as a primary tie down. Usually you can grab the ElectraGlides by where the engine guard intersects the frame and end up with a good 45 degree pull on the straps.
In rear you can grab them where the saddlebag rails go to the fender uprights just to the inside of the pipes where the two bolts are on each side.
Make sure you have a good wheel chock for the front wheel. The best tie downs are the ones they use to ship the bikes from the factory and the dealers will usually either give them to you or sell them for a couple of bucks.
Then you can run a set of secondary conventional straps to the bars as a backup without putting too much pressure on them.

You don't want to compress the suspension too much, and if you want to get real fancy put wood blocks under the frame and bottom the frame against the wood blocks with the four primary straps.
 

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Check the trailer's tire pressure often. Most likely, it has smaller tires and will run hotter than the larger SUV tires. If you have caps on the wheel bearings, I'd suggest that you replace them with bearing buddies and make sure that they are greased regularly along the way. Don't forget about the trailer's spare tire!

Have fun and take some pictures for us!
 

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flhtdave,
I'd say you hit the jackpot (concerning this forum of course). The two members that jumped in to offer you assistance, are good people. I can tell from your title (FNG) that you "might" not know them. Their advise and tips are right on. I (and many others) get a lot out of what they post. Guys like this understand Camaraderie.

Anyway you're gona have a great ride, beautiful country up there.
Welcome! When you get back tell us about your trip.
 

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I second Hippo's very knowledgeable suggestions. Use the engine guards, NOT the bandlebars, as your primary tie-down spot. Chock the front wheel or at least tie it down, too. The rears ties are mostly for stability. but use 'em anyway. I also use the frame near the saddlebacks.

Why not the handlebars? You see everyone tied-off at the bars, right? WRONG. Tieing to the bars puts too much pressure on the bars and the bars can actually come loose. Absent the engine guards (on other bikes), tie down around the triple tree. Avoid the handlebars as your primary tie-down spot. As a "backup" spot, fine.

IMHO, while one person can get a bike on a trailer or truck safely, I encourage you to use two people.

Enjoy your trip. We expect pics when you get back.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
To all who replied: pasadenajim, cox9000, boomer, straydog, hippo, thank you for the great advise. I reloaded my bike tonight to find better tie down points.
On the front of the bike I came up in front of the vertical frame rails with the straps looped them back around the outside and attached the hooks to the crashbars, leveled the bike and tightened them up evenly so the bike was sitting straight up. As I tightened the ratchets it pulled the bike forward into the front wheel chock. It also compressed the front suspension slightly. I then strapped the front wheel to the chock and secured it.
The rear of the bike is secured by two more ratchet straps connected to the passenger floorboard brackets. I rocked the bike and snugged it up equally all around. It feels very secure, I also will leave the bike in 1st gear and side stand up. All straps are clear of painted areas and not squashing any electrical or brake lines.
I am very glad that I posted this request, because I would have done it all wrong without all the help and suggestions. You guys are the best.
Will take pictures, y'all take care.
Dave
 

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Hope this is not too late . . .

I just received the Sept. issue of American Iron in the mail yesterday. Guess what one of the articles was about? Yea! Trailering! Good article for those of you who trailer. Suggest that you read it!
 
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