V-Twin Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got an 06 lowrider and I just picked up tires for it.
I went with the ME 888 , I know harley calls for 30 front 40 rear but I'm hearing mixed reviews on pressure.
What's everyone running?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
I generally run my tires at the high side of the rated pressure on the sidewall.
What does your tires say?
 

·
Registered
2008 Dyna Super Glide Custom, 2015 BMW K1600GTL
Joined
·
155 Posts
I generally run my tires at the high side of the rated pressure on the sidewall.
What does your tires say?
Why do you run that way? The max pressure on the sidewalk is the most the tire can withstand without failure under speed/load due to centrifugal force. I'd be careful running close to max.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
1986 FXRSC #3/1250 Original Owner
Joined
·
202 Posts
Absolutely do not run the max psi on the side wall unless you have a pickup loaded to the max GVWR!
The factory set that tire psi for that size tire on your bike so no matter what brand they are it stays the same. If you change tire size then you have to adjust.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,711 Posts
40/40 on my EG’s
38/40 on GNee’s Heritage
 

·
Registered
2008 Dyna Super Glide Custom, 2015 BMW K1600GTL
Joined
·
155 Posts
I've got an 06 lowrider and I just picked up tires for it.
I went with the ME 888 , I know harley calls for 30 front 40 rear but I'm hearing mixed reviews on pressure.
What's everyone running?
On my 2008 Dyna Super Glide Custom, I run 30-32 front and 36-38 rear. I have Dunlop American Elite tires, which I love. I used to run them on my 2009 Ultra Classic and they were amazing. They're equally as good on my Dyna. 30/36 is the recommended pressure for my bike.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
On my 2008 Dyna Super Glide Custom, I run 30-32 front and 36-38 rear. I have Dunlop American Elite tires, which I love. I used to run them on my 2009 Ultra Classic and they were amazing. They're equally as good on my Dyna

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk


ME888 on my Electra Glide FLH 2 years ago.

Sidewall says 50 PSI MAX cold.

42-45 PSI front cold.
45-47 PSI rear cold.

The Wide White Walls look great on my 1979 Electra Glide FLH King of the Highway.

For a 1000 lb. bike she runs on rails.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
Why do you run that way? The max pressure on the sidewalk is the most the tire can withstand without failure under speed/load due to centrifugal force. I'd be careful running close to max.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
I run on the "high side", not the max or the "low side". I think my tires were "max pressure at 44, I ran 40 to 42. Generally got 11 to 13k on the rear and 15 to 18k on the front. On one particular set I hadn't checked the pressure in quite awhile and noticed the rear was almost wore out. It only had 36 lbs. The mileage on that tire was only 7k, but I had to change it. I attributed the low mileage on that tire to the low pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Run what the cycle manufacturer recommends. On Harleys it's on a sticker on the frame.
As stated never run what's on the tire. That's the max pressure the tire can withstand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
I've had "36/40 once a week" burned into my brain for decades. That's for a '93 FXDL. Now my wife rides it without any passengers and I've lowered the rear to 38 psi just because it's lowered and rides so stiff. Stock size Dunlops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Dyna solo 38F/38R unless you're 350 pounds. Two-up 40/42
Bagger - 40/42 and 42/44 for porky occupants.

We have a lot of twisties in this area and 32 PSI will result in cupped tires. Might be OK for commuters on mostly highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
One of the biggest myths I heard over the years when I was a tech was "run what it says on the tire". As stated several times above, that is NOT a recommended tire pressure for a particular bike, but a manufacturer's maximum, aka "don't run it more than this". I strongly recommend that you start, as a new owner, with the manufacturer's recommendation, and then adjust according to your experiences with handling and tire wear.

Short story: customer came in for a service on his Harley Dyna, I told him his brand new tires (bought from another shop) were overinflated, he responded with "tire says" and insisted I leave them there. (60 psi IIRC). I capitulated, after all it was his bike. He came back 5,000 miles later with the center strips worn smooth, bought new tires and put them where I suggested.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19 Posts
07 FXDL
30 psi front
36 psi rear solo, 38 when packed for a trip, 40 when 2 up
Have run stock Dunlaps and now moved to Elites (absolutely love them) usually get 9-10K on rear, 12-13K on front.
Have had no serious wear issues, OEM front started to cup a small amount at around 10K, couldn't feel anything but I changed it anyway. There's an awful lot riding on two small patches of rubber, is it really worth it to "push the limit" when it comes to tire life?
Stay with the OEM pressure recommendation until you have evidence to support a change. They call these specs out based on tire size, rated load weight, and suspension geometry. Let your tread wear dictate your changes, mainly watching your center wear area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I talked to a Metzeler test rider during a Rider Motorcycle Rally years ago. He explained he got better mileage out of the tire at higher pressures. He wouldn't come out and say how much he was running but the more a tire squirms the more heat it builds and the faster it wears out. I started asking him if certain pressures were safe so he wouldn't have to say a particular number. Ofcourse higher pressures means rougher ride. I ended up using 50 psi rear and 40 front. I've gotten excellent mileage from ME 88's and 880's. This is on a Road Glide which is heavier. For a better ride you might go a little less. Just saying it's perfectly safe to go higher than factory specs.
 

·
Premium Member
1947 FL 1972 XLCH 1989 FLST
Joined
·
26 Posts
Here in LoCal they cut rain grooves(sipes?) into the concrete road surface, that make for a bike that wants to take YOU for a ride if you over-inflate your tires. The greater concern for me is the size of the contact patch when it comes time to stop!
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top