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Sidewall on the front, you ride a heavy bike you need the pressure to support it. Back is not as critical IMO, less with 1 rider, more with 2 and max it with full bags and 2 up.
 

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that's what I thought...but the tech who mounted my tires said to go by the manual. I just put avons on last night. on my old tires (metz) I was running close to max press that was stated on the sidewall which was 52 psi cold. The owners man states alot less. So i don't know if I was over inflated or what.
 

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The sidewall presures are for MAX load rating of the tire. The owners manual is the way to go.

Look at the full text on the sidewall "Maximum load @ XX Psi" Weigh your bike, front and rear, you'll find you are nowhere close to that maximum load weight. Running the maximum will wear out the middle of the tire MUCH quicker.
 

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I read on the Metzeler website before that the reason the pressures are higher is because of the silica used in tire construction. This makes the tire "softer" and therefore will grip the road better. However, it also makes the sidewall less stiff so it is critical that the tire pressures be maintained properly for strength. (When I find the link I'll post it). Everything I read agrees that the pressure on the tire sidewall is a "never exceed" pressure.

Here's some good info for browsing:

http://www.dunlopmotorcycle.com/infocenter_tiretips.asp?id=31

or this: http://daytonahog.com/Safety/performance_under_pressure.htm

a portion is included below.

Performance under pressure:
Everyone seems to have a different opinion on what the correct tire pressure is:
-The maximum pressure that is printed on the sidewall.
-Two pounds under the maximum pressure.
- Motorcycle manufacturer’s specs (even if you’re not using the tires that came on the bike)
-It depends on how heavy a load you have, what size tire and rim you have.

So how do you find out what the correct tire pressure really is?

You’re not alone in wondering. Mike Manning of Dunlop Motorcycle Tires says this is the most common question he’s asked at tire seminars. “I can’t blame people for being confused,” he says. “Between the pressures listed on the tire, the bike, the owners manual and the ones given by tire manufacturers, there are a lot of different numbers.”

So which number is right? Well, the number that you see on the sidewall is the maximum safe inflation for that tire. That means you should never exceed that pressure when the tire is cold (the pressure will go up from there as the tire heats up under use, but that’s OK). However, maximum pressure is seldom the recommended pressure for a tire. For that, you need to look elsewhere.

In the owners manual, and on a sticker usually located on the swingarm, you should find tire-pressure recommendations from the motorcycle manufacturer for stock tires. But if you’ve replaced the stock tires, you should probably get new information from the tire manufacturer.

Most major manufacturers maintain websites with fitment guides suggesting tires and pressures for your bike. That information is also available over the phone or through your dealer. The tire company recommendations may or may not agree with the numbers from the motorcycle manufacturer.

But in cases of disagreement, Manning recommends going with the pressures from the tire company.
 

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I called Metzler and asked their tech when I installed my 880's. They recommended that pressure be 3 lbs less than max front and rear. Air up the rear to max if loaded 2 up.
 

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Gerg said:
The sidewall presures are for MAX load rating of the tire. The owners manual is the way to go.

Look at the full text on the sidewall "Maximum load @ XX Psi" Weigh your bike, front and rear, you'll find you are nowhere close to that maximum load weight. Running the maximum will wear out the middle of the tire MUCH quicker.
Exactly right. In most situations, you don't want to run max pressure which is the pressure printed on the side of the tire. At max pressure, you'll usually get an increased possibility of side slippage in turns and increased center tread wear rate.
 

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The owners manual recommended PSI is written for the stock dunlop tires. If you change your tires from stock, even if it's to another Dunlop tire model, you should go with the PSI recommended by the tire manufacturer for that tire.
My Metz's are way too soft at 40psi because they are of a different construction than the stock Dunlops and need a higher PSI to perform properly and more importantly, safely. If you're running Metz's at 40 psi you are asking for uneven wear and possible handling problems.
 

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PhxCliff said:
The owners manual recommended PSI is written for the stock dunlop tires. If you change your tires from stock, even if it's to another Dunlop tire model, you should go with the PSI recommended by the tire manufacturer for that tire.
My Metz's are way too soft at 40psi because they are of a different construction than the stock Dunlops and need a higher PSI to perform properly and more importantly, safely. If you're running Metz's at 40 psi you are asking for uneven wear and possible handling problems.
You said it just as I would have. :yes:
 

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PhxCliff said:
The owners manual recommended PSI is written for the stock dunlop tires. If you change your tires from stock, even if it's to another Dunlop tire model, you should go with the PSI recommended by the tire manufacturer for that tire.
My Metz's are way too soft at 40psi because they are of a different construction than the stock Dunlops and need a higher PSI to perform properly and more importantly, safely. If you're running Metz's at 40 psi you are asking for uneven wear and possible handling problems.
You are, of course, correct. I was thinking about stock tires. I had Metz tires on my Dyna and did run the higher pressures suggested at the Metz website.

Having said that, I still believe most riders will find little or no occasion to run the sidewall pressure printed on the tire. That's maximum cold pressure and not generally conducive to the best traction, wear or ride comfort.
 

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The Manual for my 2006 Wide glide says 30 lbs front and 36 lbs rear on the stock tires...

I have been running both at 4 lbs below max which is 36 lbs front and 38 lbs rear..

Should I decrease to manual specs? 30 lbs seems really low for a tire with a max at 40 lbs..
 

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If you are running Dunlops...stick with what your owner's manual recommends. The pressure on the sidewall is the max cold pressure.....does not mean run them at that.
 

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Well I tried the Manual pressure of 30 front and 36 rear and the bike felt terrible..Lost my confidence and feel at all speeds..
Went back up to 36 front and 38 rear and she is perfect...

F the Manual!
 

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What I meant to say is you have to have very alert senses to feel the difference that 2 psi would make.......I'm just pulling your chain jonno. A rider knows exactly what his bike is doing and how it responds to even minor changes. I take back the beetlenut comment....too hard to find. :xhere:
 

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cwo2lt said:
I can, on the front tire anyway.
Exacty...The front in the Manual is 6-8 lbs less than I have been running it..The 2 lbs difference in the rear is negligable..
 
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