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OK, This sounds like a stupid question but I really don't know. I am considering purchasing a lift for my '06 RK Classic as I am getting too old to bend over and clean/work on the bike. My question is how do you get the bike on the lift in the first place? I am usually alone in the garage and don't want to call a buddy just to clean the bike. The RK pushes like a Mack truck and I can't see pushing it up a ramp by myself. Doesn't seem like fun trying to ride it on either. What is the proper procedure? Thanks, Dan:huh:
 

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I purchased a motorcycle lift from Sears. Paid $90. Works great. You leave bike on side stand. Position lift under frame, with one hand pull bike to upright position and balance it there, while pushing lift under frame. Use foot pedal to raise lift. I continue to steady the bike with one hand and inspect to be sure bike is well situated on lift before I raise it up off the ground.
Fred
 

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Good description! Thats the same method i use as well. If he is talking about the table lift, someone else might chime in about how to properly use it. I have not used one of them.
 

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same here fredcrn, that is a good description on the sears lift. If you plan on getting a ramp type lift, like a handy or equiv, it not hard either. First you have to make sure the wheel chock is open the right amount. Then position the bike back like 5-6 feet from the lift. While giving a good push up the ramp and onto the lift, once you get the front wheel in the chock, support the bike with right hand and tighten the chock with the left. Once the chock is tight, i like to put a frame jack under them for more support. Then finally you MAKE SURE you put a tie down in each corner of the lift to the handle bars/trees. You can never be too safe imoi. SOunds hard but you could do it in less than a minute when you have done it a couple times.
 

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My bike has been lowered, so I took casters off Sears lift. Slide it under, pump jack a couple times, look to make sure jack is centered good, and lift rest of way. Alot of guys have set up boards and stuff to get bike upright so they can fit lift under it. I think they are asking for trouble. By taking casters off, only thing you are losing out on is can not move bike around. I have never had that urge.

Feel better with my bike plant squarely on the ground.
 

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If you have the extra cash, spring for the table lift, I have had mine for several years, all kinds of uses for it,I bought the extentions for it so you can use it on lawn mowers and golf carts, wheel clamp for bikes, also works well for a bar table for partys. cost was 1000.00 for all, drive on, clamp wheel , hit the pedal. Pump lifts slide in from the side, work well, but just for bikes.
 

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I have the yellow model of the Sears lift. I think maybe they call it the professional version or something like that. I believe it gives additional clearance making it possible to fit under bikes that the red jack cannot.

With that one, you position the lift under the bike and start pumping the handle. No need to hold pull or hold the bike upright with one hand. The jack makes contact with the frame and automatically moves the bike into an upright position, before additional pumps lift it off the ground. I use my left hand to steady the bike, but I don't do any muscle work except with the pump handle.
 

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I have a Handy table lift. I start the motor, stand on the left side of the bike and lift the clutch and engage low gear. Then it's a simple matter to idle the bike right up on the stand. There is a tire vise into which the front tire fits and there is also a stop in the center of the tire vise.

If the tire vise is set properly, after you stop the engine, the bike will stay upright so that you can reach down and tighten the vise to hold the bike. I also use tie-downs and then you are ready to lift. Very simple to do alone, actually.
 

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I usually ride mine up on my lift, I am just really careful. Mine is a superlifts.com ML1000 looks just like a handy. I love it, it makes everything easier, no comparison to a motorcycle jack.

Good Luck on your choice!
 

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I've also got the Sears red jack. Like Capt. Bligh said the jack raises my bike ('04 RK) into an upright position. I put a brick under the kickstand to get the frame up high enough for the jack to roll under. Works great, best accessory I've bought yet.

Shabo
 

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The only thing i dont understand about the table lift is; is there an attachment to lift the wheels off of the surface. I seen a few table lifts and seen the attachment to hold the wheels in order to keep the bike straight but what if you needed to remove a wheel? Can someone enlighten me on that?
 

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SiLlY said:
The only thing i dont understand about the table lift is; is there an attachment to lift the wheels off of the surface. I seen a few table lifts and seen the attachment to hold the wheels in order to keep the bike straight but what if you needed to remove a wheel? Can someone enlighten me on that?
The rear wheel can easily be removed on a table lift. Some of them have a removeable section under the wheel and some don't. In either case, you need a scissors jack or something similar to raise the wheel clear of the table so that you can remove the axle. Handy sells a scissors lift for that purpose ($200) but I built one out of a modified scissors jack from a wrecking yard. ($5.00)

The front wheel is problematical on a table lift. I've watched the OCC folks and other bike builders work on the front forks and wheels on a table lift. I think they have a way to secure the bike to the table without using the front wheel vise.

Another way that I've seen to work on the front wheel on a table lift is to place the bike on the lift rear wheel first. It would take two people but it can be done.

In any case, you can do 99 % of everything else very easily on a table lift. It's also a very convenient place for tools and supplies when you are working.
 

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Thanx for the explanation. A modified scissor jack would be ideal. You could even make it so that it could be "temp" bolted or pins fastened to the table. With brackets to hold the tubular frame. Worry free wrenching! Nice. I might have to get one now. Thanx a bunch! :D
 
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