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Discussion Starter #1
Local indy says he can resleeve my stock cylinders to 4&1/8". Can this be done without getting into the stud holes?
 

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IronButt
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If they get the press in pressure wrong the liner could slip. I would go with a cylinder that is done like a axtell. What price did he qoute for that job??
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Haven't gotten the quote yet, the guy is Al Taylor, used to post on here. He street ported the heads and shortened the cyls on the wife's '07 dyna. That build turned out well, ccp matched what he said head cc's were, etc.
 

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I've talked with Otto about this before, his experience is that it is a roll of the dice on whether they slip or not and usually you are better off buying new than resleeving.
 

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Sleeving

Is this a twinkie? Would risk of movement be less if a sleeve with a lip were used? Finally, don't the bottoms of the sleeves have to be notched too?
 

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I would think that the machining would cost as much as Axtel cylinders, but in places that are liable to do smog equipment checks in the future (Ca?), this might be a good idea, if he has a good fit or system. I have seen sleeves slip on chevy 350s, VWs, HDs, etc. Unless he knows a sure fire way to do it, I would be skeptical.
 

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MaxHeadflow
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Used to do a lot of sleeving back in the 70s. Mostly Honda but some other bikes. Did one 836 kit on the parts managers cb750f. There is a bit of a procedure to doing sleeves. It's nice for the sleeve to have a a bit of a lip at the top to locate the sleeve vertically in the cylinder. Out of habit it's nice to have the step a little long then mill the top of the cylinder flat after installing.. Always install the sleeve by heating the cylinder block and freezing the sleeve. Pressing em in is a recipie for disaster when doing iron sleeves in aluminum. The aluminum will ball up and create a ridge in the cylinder. Saw a machine shop screw up a 650 kit for a CB500 royally. Drop the cylnder in, place it in a press with a little preload while it cools is best.

Al sounds like he knows his stuff but you got to wonder if it's worth it when there are places like Axtell and SnS .. I like sleeved cylinders over conventional cylinders but feel the sleeve has to be reasonably thick and it needs a good step at the top.

Bruce
 

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Sleeves

I do believe if the correct sleeve if made correctly, and the install is correct, it should not be a problem. Interesting.
L.A. Sleeve, has explained to us years ago(we have sleeved quite a few cylinders) that you heat the cylinder to a specific temperature, and then the sleeve is simply set in without any "pressing", and as it is cooling off(which is mighty quick, as you have to move fast) it grabs the pre-bored cylinder, and will not release, as an interference fit is established prior.
If someone attemped to "press" such a thin-walled, fine-grained cast-iron sleeve, into a hole, my guess, as a trained toolroom machinist, would be that it would break,crumble, get crushed, or some other harm would come to it.
The heating process never open's the door for that. Again, very interesting.
Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When he was explaining the sleeving process, he mentioned something about interference. He's working me up an estimate for a complete rebuild, including headwork, welding, truing and balancing 'wheels,etc. I'll try to get more info on the sleeving process.
 

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Hillsidecycle.com said:
I do believe if the correct sleeve if made correctly, and the install is correct, it should not be a problem. Interesting.
L.A. Sleeve, has explained to us years ago(we have sleeved quite a few cylinders) that you heat the cylinder to a specific temperature, and then the sleeve is simply set in without any "pressing", and as it is cooling off(which is mighty quick, as you have to move fast) it grabs the pre-bored cylinder, and will not release, as an interference fit is established prior.
If someone attemped to "press" such a thin-walled, fine-grained cast-iron sleeve, into a hole, my guess, as a trained toolroom machinist, would be that it would break,crumble, get crushed, or some other harm would come to it.
The heating process never open's the door for that. Again, very interesting.
Scott
I have visions of a beer can crushing.:yikes:
 

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Crushed

route66paul said:
I have visions of a beer can crushing.:yikes:
Paul,
The cast iron would actually break. It could not take the load from a press to set it tight enough, to ensure it would not migrate. Even if it was manufactured with a shoulder(best) to be counterbored flush with the head gasket surface, heating is the way that L.A. Sleeve will alert the rebuilder to.
Have converted many snowmobile engines to a lined, rebuilable cylinder set-up vs. the chrome bore.
That said, I am going to investigate this further.
 

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We have seen many aluminum cylinders with pressed in sleeves cause considerable grief if not put in with enough press fit to keep the aluminum jacket tight to the sleeve at operating temperature. We use 007" to 008" interference and heat and freeze to install. If the stock jacket doesn't crack when it cools you have a winner. If you put the new cylinder upside down in the oven and heat it up to 275 degrees and the sleeve doesn't drop out you have a winner. The problem with putting a .003" to .004" high ledge on the sleeve and use a head gasket is when the head gets up to operating temperature it will actually bend and leak.
 
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