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Fellas I thought I,d kick this out.I dont remember exactly when(crs)I read the article but I recall reading an article about shell aircraft/aviation oil and how some guys have used it in their bikes.Shell claims that it retains its viscosity up to damm near 310 degrees before breaking down!!!
It makes sense from a technical standpoint that if this oil is OK for 4-6 cylinder aircooled pipers,cessnas and what have you it oughta hold up quite well for our air cooled HD,s.
The local airport near where I live tells me that they have sold this oil to harley owners and they come back for more!! Although I,ve never personally used it I wouldn,t be against trying it.
 

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BIBS said:
Fellas I thought I,d kick this out.I dont remember exactly when(crs)I read the article but I recall reading an article about shell aircraft/aviation oil and how some guys have used it in their bikes.Shell claims that it retains its viscosity up to damm near 310 degrees before breaking down!!!
It makes sense from a technical standpoint that if this oil is OK for 4-6 cylinder aircooled pipers,cessnas and what have you it oughta hold up quite well for our air cooled HD,s.
The local airport near where I live tells me that they have sold this oil to harley owners and they come back for more!! Although I,ve never personally used it I wouldn,t be against trying it.

I dont think i would run in in my bike ,,,,,typically an aircraft engine isnt going to get subjected to the heat like a bike is .....i would stick to oil formulated for air cooled V twins ......I can never recall ever seeing 300 degrees oil temps on an aircraft .......I have run it in my lawn mower lol.....but then i am not real choosy ,, i dont like mowing that much ..rat
 

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I've also run it in pans and shovels many years ago as Grayrider says, however keep in mind that aircraft tend to ride at elevations where HD's don't go. Big difference in air temps way up there even though both are air cooled. I've never seen a component breakdown on aircraft oil but I'd suspect that additives are quite different from what is normally used in auto/motorcycle oils.

I wouldn't use it in any modern motorcyle engine. Why would you want to given the very good choices available in motorcycle or even auto oils.
 

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Snowman is off to do some shopping:
"Now, I'm off to get some jet fuel to top up my tank :yikes: :xhere:[/QUOTE]"


Jet fuel is basically just kerosene with a few goodies thrown in for cold weather operations, it's -60 up there where we cruise. If you want some real gas go get some 100 octane low lead at your local airport, best done just before you are going to get some new valves though cuz you will need them afterwards.
 

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sloxl said:
Snowman is off to do some shopping:
"Now, I'm off to get some jet fuel to top up my tank :yikes: :xhere:


Jet fuel is basically just kerosene with a few goodies thrown in for cold weather operations, it's -60 up there where we cruise. If you want some real gas go get some 100 octane low lead at your local airport, best done just before you are going to get some new valves though cuz you will need them afterwards.
If I remember correctly, 100LL AvGas has 4 times the lead as regular leaded auto gas did when it was made.
 

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Running aircraft oil in a harley would work, but it certainly isn't the best choice. One of the main additives in aircraft oil has to deal with lead deposits so it is useless in your harley. A harley engine is pretty bullet proof, but why push the envelope.
 

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I do not agree.........

aussiekeeper said:
You may use Diesel rated oil in your H/D. But not in any bike that shares w/ the clutch. Diesel oils have mucho friction modifiers.......

Ron
I use diesel oil (from work, $0.00) based on mucho research, some of it from here -

http://www.rotella.com/qa/answerresult.php?rowid=169

Can heavy-duty diesel oil be used in motorcycles?


Motorcycle gasoline engines may not seem in the same league as the big displacement diesel engine under your hood, but they share some of the same lubrication requirements. So yes, in many cases, a premium heavy-duty universal oil capable of serving both diesel and gasoline engines is the best choice for your bike.

The high power-to-displacement ratio of a motorcycle engine means rod and main bearings are subjected to loads that are not normally found in passenger car engines. The valve train is also highly loaded, and requires extreme pressure boundary lubrication. The same can be said about gears in the transmission, which are normally lubricated by engine oil. Oil additives containing phosphorus protect these highly loaded extreme pressure areas (in both gasoline and diesel engines). Because diesel engines have higher loading of components, more of the phosphorus-containing additive is present than in typical passenger car oils. And with advanced catalyst systems for gasoline engines, the phosphorus content has been declining in passenger car oils.

Since many bike engines are air-cooled, and tend to be operated at high power outputs and speeds, their lubricating oil needs to be more resistant to high temperature oxidation. That’s another advantage of a premium universal oil. Another thing you want in your motorcycle is oil that has excellent viscosity control, so that with use it retains high temperature viscosity. Some multiviscosity grade passenger car oils, subjected to extreme loads, can quickly thin out. Their viscosity can drop to the next lower grade.

One last thing to consider is whether oil contains friction modifier additives. For improved fuel economy, most passenger car oils have such an additive. But the wet clutch in your bike doesn’t perform right with friction modifiers. Universal engine oils don’t have friction modifiers.

Be careful choosing diesel oils. Not all of them are universal. In addition to the API Service Category CI-4 PLUS for diesels, look for API Service Category SL.

Premium universal oils like Shell ROTELLA® T Multigrade are formulated for heavy-duty performance, and your bike engine has some heavy-duty challenges for oil. For optimum performance, be sure your oil is up to the challenge.
 

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