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I've got a little bit of a problem and am going to try something off the wall to fix it and was wondering if anyone had tried it before.
I've got an ultra classic and the rear shocks keep leaking down.I got them here a few months back after taking off my lowering shocks and posting in the classified to see if anyone wanted to swap ,so they are used but off a 06 and look new,not even a scratch on them..so i dont think its the actual shock. Its a slow leak..takes 4-5 days to loose 15-20 lbs.I'v soaped the lines,fittings,schrader valve..but its such a slow leak that nothing shows up,and the "soap" dries up before anything can be found..So heres my next idea....fix a flat.!
Has anyone ever tried it on air shocks.
The valving for shocks are in the oil chambers not the air chamber..the air bag is bassiclly acting as the spring so theres nothing to clog up.If its in a connection it should seal and I'm thinking even if its in the bladder of the air shock it should still seal with out effecting the ride.
Any thoughts......
Thanks
Posttal AKA Ralph
 

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I would avoid the fix a flat. It'll gum up any small passages in the valves and lines. Try using windex to find the leak. Believe it or not this stuff foams like crazy at the slightest leak. Plumbers use it to find gas line leaks. Air your shocks up to the max pressure before you check.




JOe
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So chrt396 explain to me with your vast wisdom..sitting behind a screen..why it wouldn't work.Do you have a better idea.
There are no small passages to clog up on the air side of a shock ,all the valving is done in the oil chamber..if its even leaking in the shock and if its a connection wwhy wouldnt it work.It works in tube and tubless tires and at greater pressures.
I was hopping for opinion from someone that actually turns a wrench for a living..anybody?And I appreciate the windex comment..I used a solution we use at work made for finding leaks in the air systems on the postal trucks..its used on tires as well as all the air lines.but still the leak is so slow that nothing shows up.My next step..if i dont try the fix a flat..is to put a dye in the lines and hit it with a black light.We use a florescent dye to find leaks in cooling and a/c systems..Bit I have to find a way to get it in the air line.
 

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I am not a master wrencher by an means... The way I look at it is... You can always replace if it causes problems. Its only money.
 

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It is very rare the shocks leak themselfs, in my opinion it has to be in the fittings with the usual culprit the under the seat t fitting. I would try some snoop leak detecter at an air pressure of around 20 psi . If its the shocks then once you apply the tire seal if the airbag leak is on top it will not seal anyways. The puncture seal works as a coating thats why when you use it they say to ride and get the tire warm as the spinning keeps coating the tire while the heat activates it to dry. This is the only reason I do not think the tire seal will not work.If your sure its not the fittings then if me I would try taking one shock at a time off an making an adapter air fitting to check them seperately. That way if you find its a shock you can try the tire seal in that one shock and not effect the rest of the system. Good luck
BC
 

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This would be a pain in the a$$.But what about pulling the shocks and lines and air them up put them in a pail of water.Thats how I find slow tire leaks that won't show up with soap.I'd stay away from the fix a flat if it were me, just my 2 cents.
Good luck
 

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posttal said:
I was hopping for opinion from someone that actually turns a wrench for a living..anybody?
Uhm, you say you are losing 15-20 lbs of pressure? Check your manual, I think you are running WAY too much pressure. I think for two-up riding, I was to put in 10# of pressure, max. 10.

That said, I think I screwed my shocks up by putting way too much pressure in them once, by accident. They didn't fail at that time, but about a year later, they didn't hold any pressure, and the bike kept bottoming out. I tried looking for leaks using windex, but I think the shocks were toast.

I ended up buying a set of Progressive 414's, which were less expensive than the stock replacement air shocks. No more bottoming out, and I am very happy I don't have to worry about air anymore.

I'm not a master mechanic, but I do wrench my own ride. I also don't like the fix-a-flat idea. To me, it sounds like a lot of mess, for that application.

That said: I don't think its fair to ask a professional mechanic his professional opinion, and not expect to pay him for it.....do you?
 

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Soby said:
This would be a pain in the a$$.But what about pulling the shocks and lines and air them up put them in a pail of water.Thats how I find slow tire leaks that won't show up with soap.I'd stay away from the fix a flat if it were me, just my 2 cents.
Good luck
The best idea yet... @gree:


Bot said:
I don't think its fair to ask a professional mechanic his professional opinion, and not expect to pay him for it.....do you?
FORTUNATELY, there are a handful of pros who willingly post their professional opinion here. These guys make a major contribution to the knowledge base of this forum, and I doubt that they're concerned about fairness when asked a question. Pros like that are the ones I want to do business with.
 

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I strongly agree with the Windex idea. Air them up to max allowable pressure, have good access to all fittings/valves and lines, and patiently inspect the entire system. I have never used fix-a-flat but my first thought would be NO WAY I would pump GOOP into a set of shocks that has small metering orifices and passges, not to mention the pump and fittings....just as jasilva stated.
 

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Definetly do not use the fix a flat. It will clog up all lines and fittings. If you take them off, you will have to bandthe shocks to keep them from over extending. I like that idea about putting them under water, it will show what goes on. My guess is you have a fitting somewhere in the system that is slightly loose.
 

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Bot said:
<snip>

That said: I don't think its fair to ask a professional mechanic his professional opinion, and not expect to pay him for it.....do you?
If a professional mechanic posts on this forum, then I expect him to provide his professional opinion for free. Otherwise he should cancel his membership and I'll see him in his shop.
 

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Old Cowboy said:
If a professional mechanic posts on this forum, then I expect him to provide his professional opinion for free. Otherwise he should cancel his membership and I'll see him in his shop.
What, mechanics aren't allowed to use the internet for entertainment when they're off work? You're saying if a wrench hangs out here and talks about guns and politics and guitars and HOG and anything else we talk about, then he owes you his expertise for free on "how do I turn this wrench" type questions? Come on.

Edit: I'm not saying they shouldn't help out if they can, but I think it's pretty ballsy to say they have to.
 

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Man did this take a turn for the worse....................

My thought is there are many professional people here who have probably gained more here than given................................................................
 

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Sorry

Sorry, I didn't mean to get everyone up in arms about the pros having to or being expected to contribute for free. However, when one guy gave his opinion, one in which the original poster did not agree with, he said he was looking for a professional opinion. THAT was what I think was wrong. You want a professional opinion, pay for it.

If a pro wants to contribute here, great, I think its cool. It isn't cool for the question asker to solicite pro's advice only. That is all I meant.
 

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I don't like air shocks for that very reason, one more thing I have to check. My experience is they do loose pressure over time. I just ordered a pair of Progressive 412s from Eastern Performance. Better shocks, no work about leaks and you can get 'em taller, shorter or keep the same size.

lowbar
 

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posttal said:
So chrt396 explain to me with your vast wisdom..sitting behind a screen..why it wouldn't work.Do you have a better idea.
There are no small passages to clog up on the air side of a shock ,all the valving is done in the oil chamber..if its even leaking in the shock and if its a connection wwhy wouldnt it work.It works in tube and tubless tires and at greater pressures.
I was hopping for opinion from someone that actually turns a wrench for a living..anybody?And I appreciate the windex comment..I used a solution we use at work made for finding leaks in the air systems on the postal trucks..its used on tires as well as all the air lines.but still the leak is so slow that nothing shows up.My next step..if i dont try the fix a flat..is to put a dye in the lines and hit it with a black light.We use a florescent dye to find leaks in cooling and a/c systems..Bit I have to find a way to get it in the air line.
Get off the high horse. I was just joking around with ya. If you can't handle it...don't post! I get it..you were just teasing...right??
 

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On top of it all...just think!! You are asking if Fix a Flat would be OK. Just think!! That is the grand daddy of ethnic engineering. As far as being behind a monitor...what the hell do you expect? You want me to call you with my response to make it more personal?? Maybe send you flowers??? Get over it!
 

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Bot said:
Uhm, you say you are losing 15-20 lbs of pressure? Check your manual, I think you are running WAY too much pressure. I think for two-up riding, I was to put in 10# of pressure, max. 10.
No, for solo riding you should be running between 5-15 psi and for two up or with the bike at max GVWR you can run it as high as 35 psi. Straight from the 2005 HD service manual for Touring models.
 
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