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Traveling Man
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Just passing this on and asking for other opinions from those who tried Screaming Eagle heavy fork oil. When I installed the chrome front sliders , I put the Screaming Eagle heavy fork oil in. The ride seems firmer than the mushy feeling that it had before. It seems to improve the dive somewhat too. I think I will continue using it. If anyone else is using it, what do you think about the way it rides?
 

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I use BelRay 15W fork oil, which is the equivalent of the HD heavy duty or sport fluid, and it firms up both compression and rebound damping. If you overfill it somewhat, by 1 or 2 oz, no more then that, it has the same effect of increasing preload and in the baggers allows me to run without air assist.

10W is the equivalent of stock fluid, and I know of some very heavy riders that have good results with 20W



Damn, I edited yours by mistake! oops.
 

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Traveling Man
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Discussion Starter #3
I really wasn't sure what the weight might be on that heavy duty oil. Thanx for the info. I haven't tried BelRay. I have also heard that RedLine was excellent. I may get around to trying them next round.

I'll tell you something I tried a while back. A guy from the old school said that he used to use 30 wt. oil in his forks. You know how it is when you don't have anything to lose and will try anything. So I added it to a junker, shortened tubes and springs, just for grins. I was amazed at how it improved the ride. One thing that I did notice is when the forks were working extremely hard it temporarily lost some of the firmness. I'm not sure if it was because of heating up or possibly foaming. Old school tricks are certainly interesting.

A certain element is missing with owning a newer bike. Half the fun of a rat bike is nothing to loose and plenty of hands on. Some of the experimenting and risk taking is out of the question with so much money tied up in whata new one costs these days. The problem for me is that even a fixer-upper is now priced out of my range for another bike just to have fun with. But the fun of picking the brain of some of the knowledgable old school dudes is an education in itself.

Thanx again for the input. Just striking up a conversation with knowledgeable people can help us all.
 

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RedLine makes very good products, but their fork oil just became available over the last couple of years. It might even be marginally better then BelRay, but I already know exactly what the BelRay does.

You would be surprised at what some of these fellows run in "ratbikes", they often just look like rats.

I have seen some of the old timers run automatic transmission fluid, Dextron specifically, but I will never understand someone trying to save 4 or 5 bucks on oil every 10K miles. Some of these same people spend far more on unneccessary bolt ons. To each his own.
 

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Just put HD SE Heavy Fork Oil in... HUGE difference! Reduces frontend sag... Improves handling... No brake dipping... Eventually I will install heavier front springs, but this solved a multitude of problems! I feel safer on the bike as a result!
 

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Firm

I had a brake pulsating problem on my 1991 FXR just prior to stopping (thought it was because I installed new brake pads) plus a noise in the front forks when going over dips, therefore, I decided to drain the forks. What I found, right side drained 10 oz of fluid & left side only 8.5 oz. I poured 10 oz of SE heavy fluid in both forks & the pulsation disappeared & so did the noise, however, I noticed the ride is a lot stiffer & I can feel the bumps in the road but it does handle better cornering. Although this did fix my problems, I'll take it out for a few more rides to see if I can adjust to the stiffer ride. It also feels like I have a slight more vibration.
 

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Harley seems to want to keep the weight of their fork oil a secret.
I'm surprised they tell you the weight of the motor oil.

Type B, Type E and SE fork oil but never mention what weights they are.

I've been running BelRay 20W in my Sportster.
Then I knew what I was adding.
If Harley would list the weight on the bottle, I might be prone to using it but I don't put unknown weights of oil into the bikes.

I changed the front on my '07 Ultra to Progressive Mono-Tube suspension.
During assembly just 5 oz. 10W (per instructions) each side. This is for lubrication only.
Never have to change fork fluid with this set-up.
Cost of the Progressive set-up canceled any needed fork oil changes in the future.
Pays for itself!
 

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I use aftermarket fork oils in the weight I want usually synthetic, it is less expensive, not better or worse... type E, gives a squooshy, soft ride, I like it firmer. 30 weight is my facorite, but not easy to come by. So 20 will do.. there is nothing wrong with SE fork oil, other than quantity and price.
 

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Pestilence
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Been using SE Heavy on the EGlide for 12 or so years, for good reason.
Changed fork innards this winter to PS cartridge style, haven't had a chance to ride it yet..
 

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I think stock weight is actually 7 and the SE is 13. Wouldn't swear to it but that's what I remember.

I've been putting the heavy in pretty much every bike I've worked on for years and generally everyone likes it. As mentioned above, a bit less dive, a bit less squishy.
 

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Just passing this on and asking for other opinions from those who tried Screaming Eagle heavy fork oil. When I installed the chrome front sliders , I put the Screaming Eagle heavy fork oil in. The ride seems firmer than the mushy feeling that it had before. It seems to improve the dive somewhat too. I think I will continue using it. If anyone else is using it, what do you think about the way it rides?
The forks used a fixed size set of metering holes. So thicker oil slows down the transfer through the dampener rod. Give the forks a firmer feel. But what it actually does is slow the cycles.

If you want to make an even larger change, cut an inch off the tight wound end of the spring, and replace it with a spacer. If you like that, and want more, cut another inch off and use a two inch spacer. Just be sure to cut it from the tight wound end of the spring.

After that, take some shim stock and shim the slider bushings.
 
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