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Above All!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Santa brought me the reduced effort clutch kit for my 04 FLSTCI. Any words of wisdom before I attempt to install?
Thanks!
 

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My dealer did it on my FB in 50-60 minutes. They did not unhook the cable and they did not remove the outer primary cover to install the disc (only the derby cover). I know this doesn't help much but it is not a hard job but I'm just going by what I saw when they did the work. Good luck and it really works. They did not drain the tranny and just topped off.
 

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Pavetack said:
What a great idea! Thanks smart a$$
You are very welcome:RTFB:

Seriously, get a gasket kit for the derby cover and the tranny cover.
Harris posted an article about clutch adjustment. As a late Christmas gift to the lazybones around around here I looked it up paste it conveniently right below:

If you want to adjust the clutch, do this:

First, the bike must be cool when you do the clutch adjustment.

1) Slide the rubber boot off the adjustment nut assembly, in the clutch cable. Use a ½” and 9/16” wrench to loosen the jam nut back, then induce the maximum amount of slack.

2) Completely pull the clutch lever. Remove the “C” clip from the bottom of the clutch lever retaining pin, at the clutch lever, then slide the lever from the bracket, so it’s hanging by the cable.

3) Squirt Bike Aid lube into the cable just until it drips out of the jam nut assembly.

4) Remove the clutch inspection cover, loosening the screws in a “star” pattern. Use a sharpee pen, and mark the inside of the cover, to indicate which hole is the one that was on top. Always install the cover so that that hole is the top.

5) Loosen the 11/16” nut in the center of the clutch housing.

6) Using an allen wrench, loosen (counter-clockwise) the clutch adjuster screw, which is inside the 11/16” nut you just loosened.

7) This is the critical step. Gripping the shaft of your allen wrench with just your thumb and index finger turn it back (Clockwise) just until the point that you feel the least resistance. NO MORE!

8) From that point, loosen it back (Counter-clockwise) ½ turn to one full turn. Now that you’ve learned to use the clutch to control the motor, you should use ¾ turn. ½ turn is for “normal riders”, who use the clutch like an on/off switch. 1 turn is appropriate for a police bike in city traffic service.

9) Holding the allen wrench, so the screw stays in position, tighten the clutch adjustment nut. There is a torque value, but unless you have a crow’s foot, you can only tighten it so that it’s snug. If you are using an open-end wrench, take care not to let it slip off the nut, since you will be at an angle to the nut. If you do have a crow’s foot, it calls for 8 to 10 ft.lbs.

10) Replace the cover, making sure the gasket is good. Tighten the screws in a star pattern, to 50-70 inch pounds of torque.

11) Again add Bike aid to the cable, until it drips from the jam nut assembly.

12) Replace the lever in the bracket, being careful not to bend the black plastic anti-rattle shim. Install the “C” clip.

13) Tighten the cable at the jam nut assembly. Once it is roughly tightened, pull the clutch lever three times to seat the ball and ramp in the mechanism. Then tighten to the point that there is about 1/16” of free play at the lever. If you pull the cable housing out from the lever, the edge of a nickel should just fit between the shoulder of the cable, and the bracket.

Harris


More you'll find here: http://v-twinforum.com/forums/search.php?searchid=672200


Clutch cable adjustment: http://v-twinforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=68222&highlight=clutch+cable+replacement
 

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Pavetack said:
What a great idea! Thanks smart a$$
Actually I thought that was a great suggestion that many people do not do and then come on line asking for help because they did something a little wrong. :dunno:
 

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Boatman said:
My dealer did it on my FB in 50-60 minutes. They did not unhook the cable and they did not remove the outer primary cover to install the disc (only the derby cover). I know this doesn't help much but it is not a hard job but I'm just going by what I saw when they did the work. Good luck and it really works. They did not drain the tranny and just topped off.
Either our bikes are different or your dealer is a majician. There was no WAY I could fit the pressure plate thru the derby opening. If they did, WOW!!
 

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Geezerglide-Maybe I was duped by the tech. I wasn't back in the shop if/when the disc was replaced. All I know is that there was a disc in the bag (maybe the new one-had oil on it) and the old ramp. Before I took it in I specifically asked about the disc replacement and he said it could be done. This is why it's good to do repairs yourself so you know what is done. Now I don't know.
 

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Pavetack said:
What a great idea! Thanks smart a$$
I don't think he was trying to bust your balls on this. Lots of people come in here looking for help and never think of getting a manual to assist with the basics of the repair they are attempting.

Personally, I would get the manual, look over the steps then ask away if there are questions on some of the steps or if there is a possibility of a shortcut or two along the way. The experts here will more than happy to give you LOTS of free advice on that!
 

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Above All!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone. I have the manual...sometimes the experience of others is better than the manual.
 
G

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I've installed 3 of them, all on Road Kings. On the Touring models, the biggest pain is getting the exhaust loosened up so you can access the clutch release cover.

A set of ball-end Allen wrenches make the job a lot easier.

Looking at Dynas and Softtails, it appears as if the exhaust would not present the problem it does on the tourers.

As far as getting the diaphragm spring installed without removing the primary cover; it seems like it could be done, but I don't see how. The derby cover hole is just too small. Perhaps if you had some type of jig to compress the spring. That being said, removal of the primary isn't that big a deal, and assuming one is careful, the primary gasket can be successfully reused. However, DO NOT attempt to re-use the the clutch release cover gasket. It's only a couple dollars (versus $30.00 for the primary gasket) and in all three I did the old one hung up on the oil slinger, and was damaged.

Harris
 

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I installed the kit on my '02 Road King. I had to remove the exhaust. That was the biggest problem. The only problem was you need a 11/16" OFFSET box wrench to remove a adjusting hex bolt securing nut. No need to buy gaskets unless bike is real old and they have been reused multiple times. The dealer where I bought the kit suggested waiting until I got the originals off to determine if I need new gaskets or not. . Primary gasket is $30+ other two are only a couple of dollars each but every dollar saved......
 

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Highly Seasoned Rider!
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Geezer-Glide said:
Either our bikes are different or your dealer is a majician. There was no WAY I could fit the pressure plate thru the derby opening. If they did, WOW!!
The spring diaphragm wouldn't fit through the derby cover on my FLHTCUI. It was necessary to remove, and later replace, the entire exhaust system, the transmission cover and the primary cover and both floorboards to install it on my bike. Took most of a day for me.
 

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I watched my tech remove and replace the diaphragm spring throught the derby cover. It wasn't easy and it wasn't pretty. Basicly, he had to compress the plate further into a cone shape and then force it through the hole. Took a lot of effort, a lot of cussing, and a little bit of prayer, I think. I definitely wouldn't try it, I'll let folks with a lot more experience work this little bit of magic.
 

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When you go to reassemble the ball and ramp mechanism it is helpfull to fill the areas the balls set in, on the outer ramp, with grease to help hold the balls in place. It is no fun to get it all back together and find out that you can't adjust the clutch because one of the balls slipped out.
 

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AFRetired said:
I watched my tech remove and replace the diaphragm spring throught the derby cover. It wasn't easy and it wasn't pretty. Basicly, he had to compress the plate further into a cone shape and then force it through the hole. Took a lot of effort, a lot of cussing, and a little bit of prayer, I think. I definitely wouldn't try it, I'll let folks with a lot more experience work this little bit of magic.
Can you say "Scratched up primary cover?" :dunno: I knew you could. Anything will fit if enough force is applied. I got lucky, I have Kuryakin floor board extenders on my EGC and didn't have to drop the left floor board! V&H Propipes gave me access to the tranny door too. Finished up mine in 1 1/2 hrs. (that translates into 3 beers!) :wootdnc:
 
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