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Discussion Starter #1
trying to find the cause of the rear end swaying, on and 00 ultra ,replaced the rear tire and that did not correct it. would uneven loading or wrong pressure in the shock cause this? it's a hassle to say the least, feels like it going to dump me over sometimes
 

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Not a lot to go on but how about shocks? I know they are air adjustable, check them and see what the pressure is. Next check the swing arm bushings. I'm guessing whoever put a new tire on would look for loose spkokes if you have spokes. If that doesn't find the problem move up front and check out the steering head, sometimes that will feel like it's a rear end problem.
 

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fourty three and seven...
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cwo2lt said:
Not a lot to go on but how about shocks? I know they are air adjustable, check them and see what the pressure is. Next check the swing arm bushings. I'm guessing whoever put a new tire on would look for loose spkokes if you have spokes. If that doesn't find the problem move up front and check out the steering head, sometimes that will feel like it's a rear end problem.

Makes sense. I hate when things get too loose.
 

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If all else fails..................get rid of the Dunlops!!!

My R.G. has done it since day one and I find it hard to believe its anything but the tires in my case. Soon as these thing are used up Im going to Metz or maybe give the Dunlop Elite III's a try. The factory Dunlops track everything on and in the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
not sure if they checked the wheel brearings or not, I'll check it out today.
as far as the Dunlops, on my third set and never had a problem with them.
 

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newultraclassic said:
Check the fork head bearing settings also.
:duh?: Why didn't I think of that!:265: :roflback:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
probably not going to be the rear wheel bearing that there good for 100,000 miles and are a sealed unit. I'll put it up on the lift today and check to see if there is any play in the front end
 

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supernatural said:
probably not going to be the rear wheel bearing that there good for 100,000 miles and are a sealed unit. I'll put it up on the lift today and check to see if there is any play in the front end
Did you check the alignment of your back tire and bike? The alignment prcedure is shown in the shop manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
that's what I'm trying next, I had the bike up on the lift today and found no play in the front end or rear end. I talked with the dealer today about it. their telling me it could be and alignment issue if there was nothing wrong else where.
 

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Ridin' with the King
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Hey sn, let us know what you find man. I have the same issue on my RK and was thinking it could be an alignment issue. In addition to the good old tail wag, I sometimes feel like I am sitting on the bike sideways when going straight down the highway. I was planning on checking the alignment soon myself but just don't have the time at the moment. It's my daily ride so I am pretty used to it but it would sure be nice to feel like it could hold the road better.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
ok, I'm probably going to have to send it to the dealer. I've checked both the front and rear according to the dealer instructions on how to do this. I thought maybe the shocks were a problem, but both front and rear seem to be holding air fine. I saw in one of the cycle mags a procedure on adjusting the wheel alignment using two long flouresent lights strapped to each side of the wheel, If I remember it was pretty easy using this procedure, not like the service manual. before I take it to the dealer, I'm going to try various pressures in the shocks and remove everything from the saddle bags and the tourpak.
 

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Man I am watching this one close.....my bike has wondered since it was brand new and I always thought it was the tires. And with my fat a$$ it could very well be.:roflback:
 

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Rubber Mount Touring Frame

Because these framed bikes have a 3-point rubber mounting drive line, they can exhibit some minor high-speed wandering conditions naturally. However, if under same-to-same conditions the bike begins acting differently in this area, there are some things to look at.

Additionally, because this frame has a unique reverse-tripple-tree design (which helps the front-end to self-center) the check and adustment process is unique to this type front end. You will notice with any other model, if you lift the front end slightly off the ground, the front end wants to fall to the side. When you do the same to an FLT (Rubber mounted touring) frame the wheel / front end moves to the center.

Steering head bearing preload/adjustment - instead of 'fall-away', as with other models... this model uses a '3-swing' adjustment check. With the front wheel just off the ground far enough not to touch, move the front end all the way to one side and let go. The front end should stop singing on the 3rd swing. The beginning of the 3rd swing I like. you have to check in both directions, and to get the absolute best results, disconnecting the clutch cable sometimes gives the best results.

The procedeure for adjustment of the neck bearing preload is similar to any other model and covered in the appropriate service manual. Understand that when you tighten the top 'lock nut' it will affect (tighten) the adjustment you made with the star-nut. So you have to plan ahead as you adjust the star-nut.

The front (rubber) motor mount deserves a look. There should be daylight between the engine-to-mount plate and the rubber bulge part of the mount. If it's collapsed, replace it... there is a new improved mount introduced just this week after a 27 year run of the previous one. This mount is also used on FXR's.

Vehicle alignment is best done with aluminum channel attahed to the rear tire... the rear-mount special alignment tools, and an inclinometer. Let your knowledgeable wrench do this. Talk to them, see if they're comfortable with this, ask if they have the proper tools.

Tire pressure & tread trueness, shock air pressure, and front-end fork fluid condition and level all play a role in vehicle handling too.

Good luck.

HD
 
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