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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering how a bike will handle if your cruising along and a gust of wind hits you from the side? Like lets say a 40 mph wind while your doing 60 mph on the bike?

I do a lot of driving in the mountains where sometimes as soon as the road crosses to the other side of the ridge and the bank opens up you can get a major updraft comming across the road. Its enoufgh to feel a little jolt when driving my pick up, what would happen with a bike there? Would I be best to not take the bike on a windy day? or at least wait untill I get more experience riding it?
 

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...and all this time, I thought the fun and exciting part of riding on those days was being tossed in the the other lane, or onto the shoulder.:yikes:
 
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It will be similar to what you get in your truck. While the motor weighs less that your truck, it's also lower and has a smaller cross-section. Alas, this is one of those situations where the only way to get the experience is to ride in the wind. It is more managable that you are probably imagining right now, and like a lot situations, the key is to retain a firm but relaxed grip on the bars allowing the machine to move, but controlling the movement; and keep your focus up and out ahead on your intended path.

Harris
 

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Exactly what Harris said. I got my "wind" experience in South Dakota and Wyoming. Like all other parts of riding, it's staying alert and ready. I keep an eye on grass, trees, bushes, flags, etc up ahead as they'll let you know if there are wind gusts sometimes.

Editing - since I remembered that what may be worse with me, anyway, is if I'm running in a steady and/or gusty crosswind of say 40 mph or so and then it suddenly stops. I'll move farther when that happens than when the initial wind starts.
 

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I had an issue on I-5 many years ago coming across the mountains into southern Oregon. I was leaning into a good curve to the left when a gust blew down a ravine and stood my bike straight up. It took me two lanes and the shoulder to get back under control. My biggest problem was inexperience and lack of knowledge in defensive riding. Crosswinds aren't bad once you learn how to deal with them.
 

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I was having problems with my bike acting squirly in a quartering wind. turns out I was getting asymetrical lift because of the bags. I have experiance now and it don't bother me, I just slow down a little and problem solved.
 

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I also think it depends on what scooter you are riding. I used to ride middle weight Japanese bikes. On the highway, they were prone to lots of lane drift with wind or when passing or getting passed by big rigs. A nice thing about my Road King is that I don't get blown around like I used to on lighter bikes.
 

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I put the chin spoiler on my FXDX and it helped with the wind shifts. My Fxdwg3 came with one , and being 2" lower it doesn't have any issues.
 

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Everything I've ever rode naturally counter-steered into the wind and I've always thought the severe wiggling one feels in the chassis while being buffeted in high speed traffic is the same thing. I kind of like...cheap thrills I guess.

:cheers:
 

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Like Harris said, keep a firm but relaxed grip on the bars and don't try to "fight" the movement of the bike, rather kind of "go with it" and then gently correct. Here in WY we get plenty of practice riding in the wind. Heck, if we didn't ride in the wind, we wouldn't ride probably 60% of the time. I rode yesterday and we had gusts over 60 with sustained probably in the 30-40 mph range. You just have to live with it and ride this time of the year. You do have to watch overpasses and bridges because they can cause some funky wind swirling and wind changing directions. Also watch hills next to the highway which block the wind and cause you to swerve some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the information, I really appreciate it.




BryanL said:
I had an issue on I-5 many years ago coming across the mountains into southern Oregon. I was leaning into a good curve to the left when a gust blew down a ravine and stood my bike straight up. It took me two lanes and the shoulder to get back under control. My biggest problem was inexperience and lack of knowledge in defensive riding. Crosswinds aren't bad once you learn how to deal with them.
This was what concerned me the most, because in many of the sitruations when I might get a crosswind, there isn't 2 lanes and a shoulder. Just a single lane, then a few inches of pavement on the other side of the fog line.
I guess I'll stay of that one stretch of highway where it happens all the time untill I get some good experience.
 

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PeepingTom said:
I guess I'll stay of that one stretch of highway where it happens all the time untill I get some good experience.
Bad idea. You need to ride that stretch as much as possible.

When I first moved to Texas, I was amazed at the wind. I mean I was driving my Electra Glide Classic (read BIG F&^%ING SAIL!) riding along at 55 mph once, and the wind was still blowing my hair sideways! 11 years later, I think I am used to it. It's not hard to deal with once you know what to expect. Point is, you never get any better at anything unless you practice. Go out there when there is less traffic if you think you will feel better, but go out there.
 
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