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In the newest AI magazine a letter writer states that most T-bone accidents involve dressers. He theorizes that the passing lamps at night appear to be a distant car to the left turner and the car, thinking it has a lot of time, turns left in front of the bike.

Sounds possible, but what do you think?
 

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I think its just idiots not paying attention, I have yet to pull out in front of a motorcycle like that in my 37 years of driving, but thats just me.
Unfortunately, I came up on a wreck about a month ago on a Sunday night where an old lady was pulling out
of a church parking lot and did that to a new dresser, it killed the driver of the bike and the passenger
had to be life flighted out but lived.
 

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Bingo, we have a winner............

PickAttack said:
I think its just idiots not paying attention, I have yet to pull out in front of a motorcycle like that in my 37 years of driving, but thats just me.
@gree: Bless your heart @gree:
 

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swodo said:
In the newest AI magazine a letter writer states that most T-bone accidents involve dressers. He theorizes that the passing lamps at night appear to be a distant car to the left turner and the car, thinking it has a lot of time, turns left in front of the bike.

Sounds possible, but what do you think?
In between the passing lamps is main lamp, making 3 lights. How does that even remotely resemble a distant car?. The theorizer has more time than brains, IMO.

I think maybe that riders on dressers, thinking they are more protected than smaller bikes, take an inordinate amount of risks. :laugh:


***I'm just joking, of course***
 

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My theory is that, on average, dresser riders are older than dirt with reflexes about as sharp. I've been to the biker bars, restaurants, HOG meetings, etc.... It is like an antediluvian convocation... almost there myself.... almost.
 

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I usually run the passing lamps only at night when I need the suckers. Most time during the day I run with the brights on. Seems to be a good combo. Also, sometimes the turn signals (at least on a RK) are not seen with the driving lamps on. Anyway, do what ya think will keep ya alive. Mostly, keep your eyes open and watching everything like everyone is trying to kill ya.
Flatline.
 
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First, I doubt the guy's numbers are accurate, but I can't definitively say he's wrong. So if you grant his point, How about this theory:

While dressrs may not account for the majority of bikes on the road, they tend to get ridden more miles than other motors. More miles equates to higher "exposure".

Personally I never ride without my passing lamps on. They make you so much more visible, there's no way I'd give them up.

Harris
 

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it doesnt happen very often but I had to look that one up. surely I cant be the only one scratching their head on that one... so:

an·te·di·lu·vi·an ( P ) Pronunciation Key (nt-d-lv-n)
adj.
Extremely old and antiquated. See Synonyms at old.
Bible. Occurring or belonging to the era before the Flood

hhmmm hope to not be there for a long time... 40 now heading for 18 again:D
 

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In the newest AI magazine a letter writer states that most T-bone accidents involve dressers. He theorizes that the passing lamps at night appear to be a distant car to the left turner and the car, thinking it has a lot of time, turns left in front of the bike.
I think it's exactly that,......his therory. Id have to see numbers to back that up.
 

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8-Ball said:
My theory is that, on average, dresser riders are older than dirt with reflexes about as sharp. I've been to the biker bars, restaurants, HOG meetings, etc.... It is like an antediluvian convocation... almost there myself.... almost.
I'll bet that all you bikers at the bar sucking up the brew have reflexes as quick as Bruce Lee.
 

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Harris said:
First, I doubt the guy's numbers are accurate, but I can't definitively say he's wrong. So if you grant his point, How about this theory:

While dressrs may not account for the majority of bikes on the road, they tend to get ridden more miles than other motors. More miles equates to higher "exposure".

Personally I never ride without my passing lamps on. They make you so much more visible, there's no way I'd give them up.

Harris
I couldn't agree with you more. I do not know the stats either but dressers generally log more miles as they for the most part tour not ride from bar to bar. Don't get me wrong, I don't have any problem in folks riding from bar to bar it's not what I choose to do with my OL aboard. We perfer to tour.
 

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I think that you are right. I think that your all right:cheers: your allright:cheers: :cheers: allright:cheers: :cheers: :cheers: I'll have nother:cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

kenney:beer4u:
 

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ironicly enough, the more you ride the less chance you have of being a grease spot on the road. I would be interested to see the riding experiance of those people that get the t crossed. because most touring bikes are owned by "ahem" seasoned citizens, their reaction times may play more into it than the light setup.
 
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The answers posted here point out the problem with the article. If (and it's still a big "if" for me) you accept the premise that touring bikes are involved in more accidents where they got left-turned by oncoming traffic; it's a huge leap to say this is somehow due to the passing lamp arrangement. As the posts to this thread point out, there are a number of other very plausible reasons this could occur.

Apparently if the author of the article hears it raining at night, then finds worms on the sidewalk when he goes out in the morning, he concludes it was raining worms.

Harris
 

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8-Ball said:
My theory is that, on average, dresser riders are older than dirt with reflexes about as sharp. I've been to the biker bars, restaurants, HOG meetings, etc.... It is like an antediluvian convocation... almost there myself.... almost.
Older than dirt my a&s .... and you're right ... you're almost there.

I ride a dresser and always use my passing lamps .... Visability is the key word here. It doesn't matter what you ride, if there's a car heading towards you with a left signal on, anticipate that he will cut you off and be ready for evasive action ... that's defensive driving ... always expect the unexpected.

I put a lot of miles on considering the short season we have here. Not that I don't enjoy the bar hopping scene, we sometimes get together for a sunday ride and do that scene.

But I much prefer doing weekend rides leaving Friday after work and returning on Sunday. We mostly camp along the way but usually stay over at friends.
 

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modulating headlights

Hi,

I posted regarding modulating headlights in the wrong thread. Typical newbee mistake!!!!

Please see the last post by mr. breeze in the "making a turn" thread.

Sorry again.
 

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I ride a ‘00 dresser, and I have all the lights on. Day or night, it doesn’t matter, cages still have there heads up their butts! If they would remove the cell phones, that would eliminate 90% of the problems in town, and about 50% on the highway. I average 20K a year, and every time I get in a bind on the road, the vast majority of the problem is from a cage on a freaking cell phone!
 

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try modulating headlights

:stupid: :stupid: #12 02-25-2006, 05:24 PM
mr. breeze
FNG :) Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 4


modulating headlights

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Hi Ya'll, I have gone to a modulating headlight that receives 90% of everyone's attention. A couple of a--h---- STILL pulled out in front of me...but they are the one's that pull out in front of a speeding firetruck, light, sirens and all!

CustonDynamics.com and other manufactures produce a headlight that modulates (rapid blinking on & off) and really gets everyone's attention. They are controlled by an independent switch and by turning your bright light switch on. They are legal in all states during daylight hours. They must be turned off at night (duh). I usually leave mine on through dusk as that is the most dangerous time. They are affordable ...and certainly so when considering the alternative.

Give them a looksee!

Ride safe & smart.
 

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Harris said:
Personally I never ride without my passing lamps on. They make you so much more visible, there's no way I'd give them up.
Same here. That's why I couldn't figure out why they removed them on the Street Glide. People already don't see us and they remove some of the lights? :dunno:
 
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