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Like we don't know already they will tell you what to think
Indoctrination 101
By John Leo
Tuesday, September 11, 2007


In 1997, the National Association of Social Work (NASW) altered its ethics code, ruling that all social workers must promote social justice "from local to global level." This call for mandatory advocacy raised the question: what kind of political action did the highly liberal field of social work have in mind? The answer wasn't long in coming. The Council on Social Work Education, the national accreditor of social work education programs, says candidates must fight "oppression," and sees American society as pervaded by the "global interconnections of oppression." Now aspiring social workers must commit themselves, usually in writing, to a culturally left agenda, often including diversity programs, state-sponsored redistribution of income, and a readiness to combat heterosexism, ableism, and classism.

This was all too much for the National Association of Scholars. The NAS has just released a six-month study of social work education, examining the ten largest programs at public universities for which information was available. The report, "The Scandal of Social Work," says these programs "have lost sight of the difference between instruction and indoctrination to a scandalous extent. They have, for the most part, adopted an official ideological line, closing off debate on many questions that serious students of public policy would admit to be open to the play of contending viewpoints."

Nine of the ten programs, the NAS reports, require students to accept the ideology-saturated NASW code of ethics to get a degree in social work. The University of Central Florida says students "must comply" with the code of ethics if they wish to remain in school. Failure to accept the code constitutes "academic misconduct" in the University of Michigan program and "can result in disciplinary action" at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities.

"Diversity/multiculturalism" and "oppression" were among the most common themes in coursework. The report notes, "Although it's certainly true that racism has been oppressive in American history, it seems question-begging to assume that ‘oppression' is a leading cause of poverty in the modern U.S. And it is far from clear that the only pathway to a non-racist or egalitarian society passes through the gateway or multiculturalism."

The NAS called on government agencies at the federal, state and local level "to cease requiring that social workers hold degrees from CSWE accredited programs in order to be hired." By associating themselves with the ideological tests in the CSWE standards and NASW code, "such agencies violate constitutionally protected freedoms of speech and religious conscience."

At schools of education, the buzzword "dispositions" carries the message of politicized advocacy. Ed schools once required aspiring teachers to display only competence and knowledge. Then the amorphous criterion of "dispositions" appeared, referring vaguely to habits and attitudes that teachers must have. The National Council for Accreditation of Teachers of English (NCATE) said education departments could "include some measure of a candidate's commitment to social justice"—in effect ruling that public school teachers could be evaluated on their perceptions of what social justice requires.

This opened a door to reject candidates on the basis of thoughts and beliefs. It also allowed ed schools to infer bad character from a political stance that the schools opposed. At Washington State University, where the college of education tried to expel a conservative student, the dean was asked whether Justice Antonin Scalia could pass a dispositions test at her school. "I don't know how to answer that," she replied.

Interventions by free speech and religious liberties groups induced a few schools to back down in well-publicized cases of abuse. At Missouri State University's undergraduate social work program, Emily Brooker received a "C" after complaining that professor Frank Kauffman "routinely engaged in leftist diatribes." Kauffman instructed Brooker's class to write the state legislature urging legal approval of adoption by gays. She refused on religious and moral grounds. As a result, Brooker was brought up on very serious charges; to get her degree, she had to promise to abide by the NASW code. After graduation, she sued and won a settlement.

In an attention-getting article, Stanford education school professor William Damon wrote that ed schools "have been given unbounded power over what candidates may think and do, what they may believe and value." In what seemed to be an exercise in damage control, NCATE president Arthur Wise said he agreed with Damon that it is not acceptable for ed schools to assess social and political beliefs.

Still, the ideology behind disposition theory and social justice requirements is intact and strongly holds sway in the schools. It dovetails with the general attitude on campuses that promoting liberal advocacy in the classroom is legitimate and necessary. So long as government agencies collaborate with the social work programs and ed schools, reform will remain a long way off:wacko:
 

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Gotta give them credit, at least they are up front about their communist agenda.

Seems they're tired of being sued however, here is their disclaimer:

Further, the NASW Code of Ethics does not specify which values, principles, and standards are most important and ought to outweigh others in instances when they conflict. Reasonable differences of opinion can and do exist among social workers with respect to the ways in which values, ethical principles, and ethical standards should be rank ordered when they conflict. Ethical decision making in a given situation must apply the informed judgment of the individual social worker and should also consider how the issues would be judged in a peer review process where the ethical standards of the profession would be applied
http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/code.asp
 

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DJW said:
Gotta give them credit, at least they are up front about their communist agenda.

Do you mean we don't enslave these students? Instead they actually get to choose whether on not they wish to attend this communist unversity? :gun:
 

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rollin down the rvr

:yes:
swmnkdinthervr said:
Gotta admit...yer on a roll knuckleheader...
like i said last year in'my story, the begining' started out basically computer

novice. some of you will say still am.

anyhow, just tryin to spread as much good info as available.

In the end I hope the effort is positive, can you dig it?(boy is this

dated:duh?:) ~!Awesome!








pictures what pictures
 

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HiAngle said:
Do you mean we don't enslave these students? Instead they actually get to choose whether on not they wish to attend this communist unversity? :gun:
The article isn't about any individual university, it's about the certification that this organization awards to social workers through accredited programs.

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the world, with 150,000 members. NASW works to enhance the professional growth and development of its members, to create and maintain professional standards, and to advance sound social policies.

The author's complaint is that the NASW is requiring agreement to the "code of ethics" which the author considers to be a "leftist" agenda at best, I'd just call it; "it takes a village". That would all be fine, as a private organization they can accredit anyone they want, what the author is upset about it is that federal and state agencies, which are the only ones hiring these kinds of "professionals," are requiring membership in the organziation as a qualification for employment.

NASW is instrumental in assuring that the social work perspective is incorporated into pending legislation before Congress and in state legislatures. NASW’s legislative agenda targets the association’s lobbying efforts at legislation and regulations that will provide support to vulnerable groups and advance professional practice training and research opportunities for social workers. NASW’s political action committee, known as PACE, works to elect officials that best represent social workers.
 
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