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By the time I put the bike away for the winter, I'll have maybe 750 miles on my oil (M1 Vtwin) is it necessary to put fresh oil in for storage? The bike will be in my garage, which stays a comfy 60 degrees or so all winter, if it matters.
 

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not it the south :)

LtTruck43 said:
By the time I put the bike away for the winter, I'll have maybe 750 miles on my oil (M1 Vtwin) is it necessary to put fresh oil in for storage? The bike will be in my garage, which stays a comfy 60 degrees or so all winter, if it matters.
I don't winter my bike any longer, not required in SC

When I lived in NY I used to winter it ..... this is what I used to do

Fill the gas tank, put gas stabilizer in it

run the bike for a few miles to get the stabilizer into the carb and fuel lines

after the bike cooled down I'd pull the plugs and put a few drops of oil into the top of the motor, crank it over, don't start it, just to get the oil into the cylinders

put the batt on a trickle charger

come back in April
 

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Since your bike is in a nice warm place, it's not likely to have issues with condensation.
So I would fill the gas tank with fresh fuel to minimize the vapor area.
If you have a carb. if possible close the gas valve and run it out of gas.
Charge the battery once a month. You should be ready to go come spring!
 

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My bike will sit in an unheated garage from about the last weekend of October until early April. Temperatures in the garage will get down to -35 by January and fluctuate throughout the winter.

I just got it back from servicing so I won't have to live without it when riding season rolls around in the spring.

My winter routine is to add fuel stabilizer and fill the tank, get the bike up to operating temperature, drain the crankcase of synthetic, change the oil filter and re-fill it with a generic 20-50, run it for a couple of minutes to distribute the clean oil through the engine, pull the spark plugs, fog the cylinders, re-install the plugs rotate the engine a few revolutions, re-install the spark plug wires, pull the battery and put it in the basement (charge it every few weeks), wash the bike, check tire pressures, put it up on a frame lift, put a breathable dust cover on it.

And then resist the urge to start it just to hear it purr for the next five months.

I change the oil before and after storage because I assume that there will be some condensation with the temperature changes. I don't want old oil sitting in the bike and having the carbon and contaminants mixing with any moisture. Change it again before riding in the spring to get rid of any moisture that might have occurred since it was put away.

To get it back to life, I charge the battery just before needing it, get the bike running and up to temperature (ride around the block a couple of times to warm up primary and transmission fluids), change all fluids and oil filter putting synth back in the crankcase, check tires, wash and ride.

Overkill? Given the temperatures that it sits in, I don't think so and it makes me feel good through the winter knowing that it was pampered before being put away.
 

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i read an article in American Iron on this topic, and it basically said that part of the oil's job is to trap the "crap" so that it doesn't damage internal metal parts. when the bike sits for extended periods of time, this suspended material can settle out and damage the metal. how much damage? it didn't say, but the article did recommend to change oil before and after winter storage, using a low quality oil for the storage period.
battery tenders are a pretty fair price (under $50) and apparently they can get you 7 or 8 years out of a battery if you use them over winter.
 

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I change all fluids just before I cover her for the winter, add fuel stabilizer to a full tank of fresh gas, and make sure the stabilizer makes it's way to the fuel bowl. Leaving the bowl empty or draining it on carbed bikes can cause seals to dry out and become brittle I have found. Wash and detail her to the maxuimum, attach the Battey tender and she goes to sleep until spring. I do not change the oil again in spring. I put all fresh fluids in before storage in the late fall when the season ends, first snow fall, and she's ready to rock and roll come spring. I do spend some time in the garage during the winter tinkering on her but I have a garage heated to 65F consistantly all winter. Before I built the garage I used the same procedure in an un heated shed, but I stored her in one of those cycle bags with the drying agent inside. Still started in spring and went. No need to change oil twice.
 

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I don't understand, changing the fresh oil from fall, in the spring. Take it for a ride and burn off any condensation.

They say to change oil in the fall, so clean and no contaiments to eat at bearings.

Myself, I never know when the last ride will be. So unless the oil is old, I don't worry about it. I do not base this on proven facts.
 
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