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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to get some feedback on Nitrous use on the TC88 motor.
I have read a lot of info on the web regarding these systems and my focus is on the Nitrous Express system for My rig.Nitrous Express systems
It seems that the bulk of the info is offered by the companies that SELL various Nitrous systems and AS EXPECTED, they say that the use of such is not only SAFE when you keep the boost to a reasonable level (heh define reasonable will ya), but some have actually touted that it is GOOD for motors due to the cooling effects of the rapidly expanding gas in the cylander that lowers temps.
Several of my riding buddies have gas on their bikes and have seen NO major damges or breakdowns that can be attributed to the gas introduction itself and they all run the stock cast pistons with no more than the "40 hp" jetting.
I understand that forged pistons are the way to go with gas BUT I am having a rough time location forged pistons for the 88" bore and I do plan to go to 95" mid next year.
On the upside (IF it is valid info) I like the thought that the motor will really pound ONLY when I tell it to, even while staying with the low compression set up ,and ride as designed OEM when I dont.
On the down side, I dont really like all the plumbing involved.
Input and opinion is much appreciated.
Thanks
 

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giggle

giggle is both a gas and a term of expression. when i spank 600's and a few bt' at the drag track.....i use both forms...
my nitrous has been safe and i am on cast flat tops. i am using a 30 hp shot, and will increase it to 40 this winter. i use the edelbrock and suggest it because in hard riding you dont have to PRESS THE BUTTON at a certain rpm. I hold it down and when the bike revs to about 4500rpm it kicks in....simple and safe. Go for it...keep it from pinging, use an igntiton that retards to prevent ping(dyna2000i) and keep it to a reasonable shot and its huge bang for the buck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just gonna post some info I have gathered while doing the "homework"
The following is an excerpt from Ironman1's V-twin pages (a really good read I stumbled across during a web search by the way) Take a few and check it out.Irinman1's V-Twin pages

Nitrous Oxide (N2O)

The use of a nitrous oxide injection system is one method of increasing power by 30% or more, depending on how it is setup. For street use on late model bikes with factory lower ends (pistons, crank, rods, etc.), a 30% power boost should not over-stress the engine too much if reasonable rpm limits are observed. Nitrous comes in two flavors, U.S.P. for medical use and Nitrous Plus for "off road" engine use. Many speed shops keep Nitrous Plus in stock for refills, but be aware that, if you are tempted to "cop a high" by breathing nitrous, it contains a nasty toxin (sulfur dioxide) that is specifically added to discourage such use. Put it in your engine, not your lungs.

Nitrous oxide is an oxygen-bearing compound, or oxidizer, that allows additional fuel to be burned during combustion. That "additional" fuel must be injected along with the nitrous or the engine will become dangerously lean and may self-destruct. Several kits are available with varying bike-sized nitrous storage tanks and most systems use a button on the handlebar to actuate a quick dose of extra horsepower. Refills can be a hassle, however, and certain carburetor and/or intake manifold modifications have to be made during installation to accommodate the injection of more fuel. Unless you have competent mechanical and tuning skills, the setup of a nitrous system should be done by professionals.

Nitrous tanks should be mounted in a location where they are protected from rupturing if the bike goes down (the sudden release of a nitrous cylinder pressurized to 1,000 PSI could greatly complicate an accident). Most bikes are short on such space, but, if possible, the container should be mounted on the inside of a frame tube or other protected location.

Once installed and dialed-in, a nitrous bike can be a strong street machine, capable of surprising bursts of acceleration, especially if it is equipped with a hot ignition, a free-flowing air filter and an efficient exhaust system. But, it is not quite a Ninja-killer yet. That requires internal engine modifications but it can be done and still retain street reliability. It's mostly a matter of dollars..... like the speed shop sign says, "We sell horsepower, how many do you want?"
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Kerry.
Great Tip on the Ignition!!!!!
I'll look into that model.

Also, I have read in several places that an increase in the exhaust port size, and polishing the chamber and exhaust ONLY to mirror and NONE in the intake is the most beneficial for a Nitrous system.
Can anyone comment on this issue?????
 

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NOS motors like longer exhaust duration. A trick for cars is the use of higher ratio rockers for the exhaust. Any thing that helps the exhaust gas speed will help a NOS motor. Most (if not all) drag racers (pro) have cams that are grind for NOS if thats what they use.

For your $ do all your stuff all at onec to iner motor mods. To me it make no sence to tear down a motor twice if you know you want to tear it down for 95" . Do it the 1st time and get it right . This will save you $$$.
Head work a must for what your looking for I say.
 

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P&P work on the exhaust will probably have a good effect on performance, but the same done to the intake will as well. Kinda like the idea of opening up the exhaust with a better system, but leaving the stock air cleaner the way it was. Build it as a system.

I could see nitrous motors liking the higher lift with the ratio rockers, but not really more duration. For the RPM's an HD engine is going to run at, you don't want anything to long or your low end (ridability) is going to suffer. Now if you build the engine to handle high RPM's, and you don't mind the loss of normal around the town power (contrary to the original post), then a longer duration with more overlap would be a good thing.
 

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Polishing the intake port is a bad idea. Proper porting is the way to go, a course start smoother in the middle and polish the last 1/2" at the seat. Thats the way to port a street motor intake.
 
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