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So I recently bought a 2002 dyna superglide. This is my first Harley and I only know the basics. So, I am looking to build my motor somewhat on a budget but want to do it correctly and want to bulletproof this motor. It has a measly 17k miles so I know it has a lot of life left but I want to guarantee that. Keep in mind I am not a new rider I have been on motorcycle last my whole life so when I ride, I really ride my bikes. I ride em hard and put em away wet😎😎. Any direction and advice from the all you TC 88 pros out there would be greatly appreciated. Ride on!
 

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Depends on your budget. The more HP/Torque you want, the more expensive it is.

What ever you decide, don't piece meal it together. Save your money and make all of the mods at once.
 

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dude,, i have to get a good laugh, from such a vague request...

why dont you start with,, how much power and torque you are looking for, and how you ride.. does your bike have a carb or efi? rpm range you wish to operate in,, some here, are pro builders and pro/semi pro racers,,
you need to include the top end of your budget..
 

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Like tall terry said, that's a vague request. He's one of the pros around here and I'm sure he's seen more F-ups from us rookies than he cares to admit.

Since we don't know your mechanical ability or your goal, my tips may not fit you. But here goes. Assuming you have a pretty good mechanical background, assortment of decent tools and a place to do the work and store the bike while it's down, you may be successful with doing the teardown and assembly yourself. Otherwise, don't go that route, have a pro do it.

Set a realistic goal. An engine with a giant HP number ain't worth a chit if doesn't fit your riding style. And a big peak horsepower number isn't necessarily best for our "tractor" engines.

1) Before you jump off into a build, read, read, read. Learn which advice to listen to and which to take with a grain of salt. I joined this forum (and a couple of other forums) and read the posts for over three years before I did the engine mods on my 2004 Road King.

2) If you do the teardown and assembly, you may need some specialty tools depending on the mods you pick. Allow for these in the budget.

3) Allow for tuning in the budget. A poor tune will make a decent engine package a disappointment. A carb is a little easier once you understand how it works but you'll still need ignition timing adjustments. If it's EFI, find a GOOD tuning shop with credible references to do the job before you even start buying parts. They should have certain tuning devices and engine combinations to recommend that they have tuned with good success.

4) Unless you have some successful experience building internal combustion engines and understand why they work, consider buying the parts from someone that has that experience on Harley engines. I worked in a shop years ago where we built drag engines for cars. I understood why you can't run a monster cam with low compression or vice-versa. An engine that makes good power where you will need it, comes from the right combination of parts. Not a hodge podge of crap you pick out of the magazine or cyber shop. When I started my 88" to 95" build, I used a shop that sponsored this and other forums to source most of the parts, machine work and head porting. He gave valuable advice on compression ratio, camshaft, etc. DO NOT jump on a "big bore kit" then find the compression ratio isn't right for the best camshaft for your goal.

5) As Alan said, "don't piece meal it together. Save your money and make all of the mods at once." It will be less expensive that way.

And one more tip if you plan on doing any work to your bike. Before you do anything, get the service manual, parts manual and consider the electrical diagnostic manual.
 

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What do you have to spend?

What do you want out of it?

Just upgrading the cam chest can set you back quite a lot. Past that, it doesn't really need much for dependability.
 

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There are no guarantees.
BTW, what does "put them away wet" mean?
It started out referring to horses, putting it in the barn or stable when it is overheated, without taking proper care of it.
It now means something not well cared for. Not something to brag about.
 

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I got 140K+ on basically stock carbed 88TC - Cams and rebuilt carb with upgrade jets is all I've done. You want miles? change the oil plugs at Harley intervals with quality synthetic and stop putting it away wet.
 

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So I recently bought a 2002 dyna superglide. This is my first Harley and I only know the basics. So, I am looking to build my motor somewhat on a budget but want to do it correctly and want to bulletproof this motor. It has a measly 17k miles so I know it has a lot of life left but I want to guarantee that. Keep in mind I am not a new rider I have been on motorcycle last my whole life so when I ride, I really ride my bikes. I ride em hard and put em away wet😎😎. Any direction and advice from the all you TC 88 pros out there would be greatly appreciated. Ride on!
Put cams in it and a good gear drive. Then have the computer tuned to what they call a stage one. Then leave it alone!!!
The best thing you can do is either go all in or just what I said.
You will regret it!
 

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When my tc88 hit 40k miles I decided to replace the half worn cam chain tensioners. Went with the feuling cam chest kit, high flow pump, improved flow camplate, new chains, hydraulic tensioners and 525 cams. Put on V&H 2-1 propipe and had it tuned. 90hp and 92 tq. I was pretty pleased for about 1000 miles then the rings gave up the ghost and started leaking down. So I pulled the jugs, bored the for 95" pistons and rings, valve job, new valve springs and light head decking. 92hp/100 tq. Whole new bike really.

Since I did all the wrenching and took my top end parts to a local machine shop it didn't cost me a lot more to do it in stages. Extra oil and an o-ring or gasket here and there and my own time.
 

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Since I did all the wrenching and took my top end parts to a local machine shop it didn't cost me a lot more to do it in stages.
If you do mods in stages and do the wrenching yourself, the largest single added expense will probably be having it tuned again if that is needed.
 

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If you do mods in stages and do the wrenching yourself, the largest single added expense will probably be having it tuned again if that is needed.
Good point. Forgot about that. So yea two tunes at $495 as opposed to one. Damn...cost me more than I thought...
 

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I’ve heard nothing but good things about dynojet power vision from fuel Moto, probably cheap way to keep tune especially if you change things.
 
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