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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I'm soon going to be new to motorcycling because I don't even have a motorcycle driving license but I intend to in the next couple of months. The thing is: When I go get my first motorcycle, should I buy an H-D Sportster (which are the motorcycles within my current price range) or should I first get some experience with another brand of motorcycles, such as Honda, Yamaha or Suzuki?
Let me say that I do not think any less of the H-D Sportster line, it's just a matter of money.
And besides getting experience with another motorcycle, I sometimes have te impression H-D's were meant for those who have motocycling in their veins. I'm too young (24) to start with an H-D.
What do you think?
Thanks in advance!
Rodrigo
 

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You should be able to find a decent Metric bike for 2-3 thousand (used bike). You can ride until you determine if you like riding or not. Then you can upgrade to a whatever you like. If you decide riding a motorcycle is not for you, you won't be out alot of money, and may even get your money back.

Just my 2 Cents
 

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wehohl said:
You should be able to find a decent Metric bike for 2-3 thousand (used bike). You can ride until you determine if you like riding or not. Then you can upgrade to a whatever you like. If you decide riding a motorcycle is not for you, you won't be out alot of money, and may even get your money back.

Just my 2 Cents
I second that motion. Something cheap and simple to learn and developing a love for riding, then move up to Harley.

A friend of mine used to say " Your are an idiot if you've never owned a Harley, if you only owned Harleys you are an idiot too"
 

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I agree as well. Buy a cheap *** bike for starters. If all well, flog it off and buy a HD. A Sportster for a first up rider can be a handful. Weightwise in particular. An 883 or 1200 are the same weight. I'd suggest go for a *** bike, 250 or if you are feeling confident a 650.

Recently I did an intermediate riding course. I found particularly sharp corners quite difficult. Later in the day I did the same corners again but not on my Sportster, instead a Honda CB250. Well.... I flew around the corners no probs. I was amazed with myself. Not only the physical size and weight, but also the $$$ value got into my mind and limited me completing the challenges well on my own bike.

Remember take it easy and have fun..... Dave.
 

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Minority opinion: If think you want a Sportster buy a Sportster. A Sportster was a first bike for many of us. If it's not for you, you can always sell it. But once you have the "Harley itch", it will not go away. Might as well "scratch this itch" right off.

Another suggestion: If you can afford it (and you probably can because the payments won't be that much different), buy a 1200. Might as well "scratch that itch" really well.:D

I would have loved a Harley at age 24. When I was in my late teens and early twenties the Sportster was one of the bikes of choice in the younger crowd. I'm a 63 year old school principal. My kids love both my Sportster and my Super Glide. They think that both bikes are really "cool". Go for it!!!

Tom :cool:
 

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Can I just say? I rode a Honda 400 CMT for a lot of years..never thought I would ride a Harley...when a friend of my husband's came over and asked if I wanted to take his bike out for a spin, did I say no? Ok, initially yes, but then I said yes!! After that I tried to win one for a few years but then I decided to buy one...There is an issue of the weight distribution which was significant but taking the "experienced" MSF and for 35.00 I feel very comfortable on the bike. I bought it thinking I would "trade up" to a fatboy but after riding this bike, this is the one I want. I love this bike...good luck in whatever you decide, cause it depends on each individual.
 

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I put a few thousand miles on a Honda Sabre (Shadow) 1100 and while it is a bigger bike, it was much easier to handle than the sportster.

The sportster is a great bike, but more of a "hot rod" bike. Not that you couldn't learn on it as your first motorcycle, as many people have.

If you really want a Harley, then get one. You will have a learning curve on any bike you get. If the name is not a big deal then get a metric 650, 750 or something to get used to. Typically they are much easier to just hop on and go.

Regardless of what direction you go, make sure you take the MSF course it will be the best investment you make.
 

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When I was 21, I bought a Honda 750 SS and every time I got on it I wished I had gotten a Harley. Don't get me wrong, I loved that Honda and had a lot of fun on it and it was in my price range at the time, but it never fulfilled that yearning, that dream. When we started having kids, I promised my wife that I would not ride until the kids were older and I sold the 750. Last year I returned to riding (25 year hiatus) and bought the Harley I had always wanted.

In looking back, I don't know that I would have, or could have, done it differently, but I do know that I compromised with that Honda.
 

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The first bike I owned was a 1973 Honda that I bought new. I put pullbacks on it, shorty exhaust, serious custom paint and a host of other things. One day I realized that I was trying to make it look and sound like a Harley. So I went out and bought a new Sportster. Get what you want. Life's short.
 

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My import experience:

While sealing the deal on my first bike, a Yamaha 600R, just about to load it on to my truck, a couple on a Harley rode by and yelled "Don't do it!". Too bad I had already signed the papers, cause I could have gotten a new Sporty for less than what I paid for the Yamaha.

Oh well, I guess what I'm trying to say is that if you want a Harley, buy a Harley. It may be a touch more difficult to learn on, but you won't have that "If I only woulda..." feelin. An MSF course is a must, and with plenty of patience and practice you can have any bike under your complete control.

By the way, you're never too young to own a Harley. My first was when I was 21. What a feeling! I'm 28 now and severly addicted, just bought another. That's my 4th since '01.

darrell
searching for more room in the shed for another bike
 

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I would say get the Sporty. One you learn to handle a Sporty you will find that riding any other modern HD model is a cake walk.

But be careful...you might end up never wanting to get rid of it.

The great thing about there Sportster is that it can be anything you want it to be, a cruiser, a tourer, a racer, dirt track, hill climb, whatever you want. There are not many other bikes that can do so much...and the best thing about it is that after you do all the modifications you want to do to make it your very own you will still have spent less than the new price of most BTs.
 

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I bought my first bike last year. A 2005 XL 883. I bought it, took it out at night a few times to get to know it and then took the motorcycle safety course. In my state if you pass the course they just give you the license. In about two weeks Im taking my bike for a Zippers Torkster upgrade to 1200 and Ill add some nice pipes, air intake, adjustable push rods and covers and a adjustable ignition. Guaranteeded to double the HP and torque. My point is, if you want a Sportster, get it. Advice; get a 1200.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks!

Gee, everyone, thanks so much for the attention and the advices! I'll certainly use all of them, in the end, to decide. Thank you all!
Rodrigo S. Reston
 

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I was in your shoes too!

I loved harleys since I was a kid. Learned somewhat how to ride in my teens with my friends 175's and 125's. Then I did'nt ride for 20 years. Was at a dealer with a friend (long time rider) and said the hell with it (no license, no nothin) sat on a few bikes and said i'll take this sporty here. My friend was shocked as hell because he had to bring it to my place. But any way a few phone calls the written test and a riders course (very helpful for a rusty rider) and bamm licensed harley owner. I felt the sporty was an awesom bike to get the feel of riding again. It handles like a dream to me. Just my thoughts, and starting cheap is also a good idea too.
 

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Try and ride some different bikes if you can or sit on them all and buy the one that feels good. It is kinda like when you chose a girl friend in high school, why this girl? It just felt good!!

If you really want a Sporty go for it. You don't have to buy a new one, there are a lot of good deals out there on used ones. Good luck.
 

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I got my license the hard way, on a Katana 6000; oops, 600.

If I were to do it again, I would get a Honda rebel, or a 250 dual sport; figure out how to make the thing go, take the course, then sell it and get the Sportster. Do it early in the sping, and you won't lose much $ on the re-sale; there are always beginners looking for starter bikes.
 
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