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Discussion Starter #1
I turned my bike over to R&D Performance here in Shreveport to diagnose an at-idle oil pressure light problem. They did some preliminary digging, found out my crank had excessive runout, causing a failed cam plate bearing (evidently its cracked), a bad oil pump, and ruined crank.

Current estimates at pulling engine, repairing the broken parts, and reassembly look to be in the $2500 range.

Here is the trick question:

I'm currently running at 88 inches. My crank must be replaced. Current thoughts are:
a) have a stroker crank installed
b) have cylinders bored to 95"
c) have both done

Any ideas on what cranks to look at, what a stroked 95" engine's dispacement would be, low buck options, etc?

The cases *must* come apart, so this is the best time to look at doing a stroker upgrade, IF it is worth the possible increase in cost vs performance.

Other ideas and suggestions are welcomed!
 

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I had a crank go bad on a 2000 Road King at 26K and had a shop replace it with a 106" S&S stroker kit. Also went with geared cams, billet cam support plate, and fueling oil pump. The shop "decked the heads" against S&S advice and I had a very detonation problems. Finally sent a set of heads to big boyz cycles and have been happy since. I am very pleased with the S&S flywheels. The bike runs incredibly smooth. I've put a little over 40K miles since the change and no problems.
 

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I've got an 95" out of an 05 fatboy at Patrick Racing right now waiting for them to do the Timken case conversion and a 113" build for that same reason. The pinion shaft was out .060", broke the oil pump and cam plate big time. What ever crank you intend to install, get the case conversion done first.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, R&D is fixing me up.

Having to replace the crank, bearings, cam plate, oil pump, and various small parts.

The good news is, I'm getting the SE Pro crank (not the cheesy one, the good one), combined with boring the jugs, gonna end up with a 103 engine, for about $400 above the basic repair cost :)

Stock crank (evidently the new replacement cranks are the same as the cheesy SE crank, with shorter conrods) is $970, the "good" SE crank is $1040
so I'm only paying $70 more for the stroker!

Gonna end up with a 9.5 cr 103 engine, supposedly pushing 110-114 hp...this is soooooo sweet!
 

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Rockbiter, I would warn against using any MOCO crank. They are not as good as they are supposed to be. Mine was 14 thousands out on runout. There are others here that have had the same problems. If you end up getting it, send it out to Dark Horse Crankworks in WI. They completely rebuild the unit and you won't have to worry about it coming apart or any runout. I believe it will cost about $450 but consider it as insurance on your lower end.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not using the $699 SE crank (world reknowned as crap), but the $1040 SE Pro version.

This is intended to be a mild build, as I'm more interested in durability than peak numbers.

ViennaHog: I've got 26k miles on this bike
 

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Do the Timken conversion. Sure wouldn't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
at $300, the timken *would* hurt my wallet. Ricky Farmer told mw that If I went high compression, he would highly recommend it, but that with the low compression, I should be just fine. the bearing itself is being replaced, so it will have "good" bearings in there...
 

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if the bottom end grenades, it is going to hurt your wallet a lot more than $300 -2$en#e-


I can definitely understand being on a budget, that is why my bike is still stock,
but I do believe in doing things right the first time...
 

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santino said:
Rockbiter, I would warn against using any MOCO crank. They are not as good as they are supposed to be. Mine was 14 thousands out on runout. There are others here that have had the same problems. If you end up getting it, send it out to Dark Horse Crankworks in WI. They completely rebuild the unit and you won't have to worry about it coming apart or any runout. I believe it will cost about $450 but consider it as insurance on your lower end.
Too bad your in a hurry, the same money would get you one of R&R's new 5 piece rebuildable units comming out soon. At the least I would retrue and weld the new crank which we do here.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok, I need some quick education.

Monday buy crank; Tuesday send it to be rebuilt?? Why would a NEW crank need to be rebuilt? What does the rebuild process entail?

I can almost see the trueing portion, as things can get rough in shipping, possibly knocking stuff out of alignment. I just don't understand buying a brand new part, and having to spend another 50% of the retail price to make the part useable.
 

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My crank is the $1000 plus SE one and it was still 14 thousands off. HD's QC is not up to par with the likes of S&S or R&R. Their pieces are not designed for a pumped up motor. A little run out (say 4-5 thousands) probably wouldn't be an issue with chain drive cams but how would you know without measuring the unit. Take it from me and play it safe, have the thing checked and trued if needed and add the Timken conversion. You may want to add gear drive down the road and you would definately need to have next to zero run out. It's insurance that is worth it.
 

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We just got an '04 Road King in the shop. Bike vibrated worse and worse until the owner said it felt like it "locked up and stalled" at a stop light. He got it trailered to our shop and we found the crank was out .060", the cam plate bolts and all but one oil pump bolts were finger tight.
The MOCO states that they wiil tolerate up to .012" out of true. My question is the bushing at the end of the crank does not have that much clearance. It seems to me that it would tear up the bushing and drop some oil pressure. Just my two cents worth on that. By the way the cam case was never opened and the bike has less than ten thou on it, and the rider is not a beater.
John Therrien
M.I.A. Cycles, NY
 

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Rockbiter said:
I'm not using the $699 SE crank (world reknowned as crap), but the $1040 SE Pro version.

This is intended to be a mild build, as I'm more interested in durability than peak numbers.

ViennaHog: I've got 26k miles on this bike
You are not using the cast, but the forged one. That's good, but still need to have it proplugged or welded (or both) and need to have it balanced. Otherwise, you run the risk of shifting the wheels on that one as easy as the "cheap" crank.

The Timken upgrade is a good measure, HD should of never gone cheap. The new bearing configuration is a bad engineering design and by reading your signature line, you like to life at the high end.

Regards,
NC
 
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