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Discussion Starter #1
Please Sticky: Mods for 150 tire on FLH's

I've had to drag this up on various forums several times. Could a mod please sticky this next to the softail mods HdWrench details for a 200mm? I've been riding (hard) with this kit for atleast 17,000 miles now and have had no issues.

150 tire kit on a Road King. this is what i came up with. here it is short and simple: H-D makes a shim part # 40932-81 for about $17. Custom Chrome makes the same shim part # 19722 for $11. take the shim and cut the inside of it (were it mounts on the hub) and machine it out to 2.216 inches. this will let you slip it on the hub. the shim will make for a flat and safe mounting surface for the pulley instead of a hand full of washers. to align the pulley, shim and hub i used three 7/16th (i think) drill bits for centering. then put in two bolts and snugged them up. pulled one of the drill bits out at a time and put the next bolt in and snugged it up. do that with the rest of the drills and bits. the holes in the pulley are 7/16 (.4375). the holes in the shim are about .010 inch larger (.4475) then the pulley. when you center the pulley and shim to the holes in the hub you split the differance in the shim holes. that way the maxamum the pulley can be off center is .005 inch. this is very little. not enough to worry about. also the aluminum pulley holes were slightly crushed. i had to clean them up first with the 7/16 drill bit. follow all other directions that i sent.

So…now that you’ve got your tire (and a new tube)…let’s get it on your bike. Step By Step:

1. REMOVE THE REAR WHEEL

A. Jack up the bike and secure it to the bike lift.

B. Remove the bags and side covers and mufflers if necessary.

C. Remove the C-clip from the axle on the right side, then remove the big axle nut.

D. Put your wrench on the other (left) side of the axle and twist it to loosen the belt adjustment. Note the position of the clamshell adjusters on BOTH sides…they will need to be reinstalled the same way.

E. Place the end of a large screwdriver on the right end of the axle and smack it with your hand (not a hammer) until the axle slides out and the wheel drops.

F. Stand over the back fender, reach down and lift the wheel up a little, then slip the belt off over the edge of the pulley. Now roll the brake caliper up and outward until it clears the wheel, then drop the wheel down and remove it from the bike.

G. Go get your new tire mounted on it.

2. MODIFY THE BELT GUARD

A. Remove the belt guard by removing the two 3/8" screws in the aft end of it, then loosen the front screw just so you can slip the guard forward a little and drop it off.

B. See the metal strap that’s holding the rubber flap? This has three rivets that fastens the metal band to the plastic belt guard. Using a hacksaw, cut the metal band right behind the second rivet. Pry the third rivet out with a screwdriver and discard that section of metal band

C. Cut the rubber flap off even with the remaining metal band, and re-install the belt guard back on the bike.

3. INSTALL MY SPACER KIT:

A. Remove the drive pulley from the rear wheel (5 bolts).

B. Lay the wheel on a flat surface, or on a garbage can with the lid removed. Re-install the pulley with two of the yellow (cad-plated) shims on each pulley bolt underneath the pulley. This will space the pulley over to the left far enough for the belt to clear the edge of the tire. (The FRONT pulley is wider that the rear and will accommodate this change) Put some LOCTITE on the bolts, and tighten them just snug, then loosen them a hair so you can move the pulley a bit.

C. With the wheel on a flat surface (or on a garbage can,) stand directly over the center of the wheel and eyeball the pulley to center it on the hub. This will get it close enough…just as close as those bozos at my local Harley shop do when they sell you their $100 custom-machined pulley spacer. Snug up the bolts so the pulley can’t move, then stand the wheel up and torque these bolts 55-65 ft lbs.

D. Loosen the left side shock absorber bolts, then remove one at a time and slip two of the stainless shims onto each shock bolt between the shock and frame. This will space the shock far enough outboard to clear the edge of the tire. Re-torque the shock bolts.

4. RE-INSTALL THE REAR WHEEL:

A. Installation is just the opposite of removal…although there isn’t as much room in there now with the wider tire. Get the belt on the pulley first. You might have to twist it sideways to get the wheel up into the fender. Lift the wheel and roll the caliper back in, then slide the brake rotor up into it.

Note: Watch out for the little rubber nub in the caliper where it contacts the swingarm…if it gets cockeyed the caliper won’t seat correctly and will bind up the axle when you try to reinstall it.

B. Install the axle and spacers. This can be kind of a pain in the ass, so having a friend around might be helpful.

C. Install the clamshell adjusters and big nut on the right side. Snug the big nut up somewhat. With the wrench on the left side, twist the axle to obtain the proper belt tension. (5/16" deflection with 10lbs pressure on the belt at the midpoint) Make sure that the belt is tight enough or it’ll squeak like hell and you’ll think something’s wrong. Now torque the big nut on the right side to 95-105ft/lbs, and install the c-clip.

D. Spin the wheel by hand and check for clearance. The pulley shouldn’t scrape on the swingarm or the shock, and the belt shouldn’t scrape on the tire. Clearances will be tight, but nothing should scrape. The important thing is that there is no contact when the bike is going down the road.

Note: these pulleys are CAST, and aren’t cast very precisely either. There is usually a certain amount of runout (wobble) in the pulley from the factory. So don’t be alarmed if you see some now. The wheel will also have some runout in it as well. On my bike the wheel wobbles over and the tire just barely touches the belt at one point in its revolution. Hasn’t caused any problems that I can see in 500+ miles of riding, but I plan to get the wheels trued up in order to eliminate this.

E. Install the bags and pipes and you’re done. Looks like it ought to now…doesn’t it??? Give the rear brake pedal a few pumps to re-seat the pads onto the rotor…otherwise you’ll have no rear brake the first time you try to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
By the way, this kit works with the wider belts and wheel setup of the pre-2004 bikes Not that it won't work on 2004 and up, but I'm hearing that this is NOT needed for the newer models due to the modifications already done by the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
TXCHOP said:
FOUND SOMETHING I just found this as it may be helpful to pre 04 bikes....
Nice find TXCHOP! Now you can buy the spacer ready made instead of commisioning the work.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
phat1020 said:
Pingle now makes a spacer for this.
Yep, two or three already beat you to that discovery in this thread:harhar:
 

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Fender filling !

I just wanted to thank Seahag for the lesson in tire fit. I just got new Carriage Works wheels and Michelin tires using a 150/80-16 for the rear. I ordered the spacer from Motorway Engineering inthe .250" size and everything fit perfectly. I just had to trim a little rubber off the back of the belt guard to keep it off the tire. It is tight but that's the way I like things anyway !
 

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harleys_n_laddertrucks
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Pingle spacer

:flames: Has any one used the pingle spacer on a 2003 or 2002 electra glide w/ the 142 dunlap tire?
 

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Check that Load Rating

Hi all, first post here so be nice please!

When I was looking at ME880s for our '01 FLHT we had just returned from a ride where a rider had a blowout on his OEM rear Dunlop. He is a big guy, his wife is not small either and they had a lot of luggage on the back. They were not hurt too badly (broken shoulder for the rider), but it made me wary of tire load ratings on these heavyweights.

Unless Metzeler has made a reinforced version of the ME880 in 150/80 I would advise sticking to the 140/90, it fit on my '01 with no spacers required and has 901 lbs of capacity. It's hard to decipher the load capacities on the Metzeler website, but from the load indexes you would lose 147 pounds of capacity (908 vs 761 at max recommended pressure). That's a bunch.

If you only ride solo the 150 might be okay (keep an eye on those pressures, though), but the 140 rides and handles great and you can't hardly see it on a bagger anyway...

Tom in SoCal

-2$en#e-
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Or do what I did, and buy Michelin Commanders. They had the highest load rating I could find and come in 150/80/16 sizes.;)

That load rating is one of the reasons I have not tried a Metzeller yet....I'm not a little guy either.
 

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Michelin

Seahag said:
Or do what I did, and buy Michelin Commanders. They had the highest load rating I could find and come in 150/80/16 sizes.;)

That load rating is one of the reasons I have not tried a Metzeller yet....I'm not a little guy either.
Looks like the 150/80's index is 77, same as the 140 Metzeler. The construction is similar too, with a rayon carcass and aramid belts. It's been forever since I used a bias ply Michelin, the radials used to cup on the front. Exactly how wide is it on the rim, overall? And let us know how it wears, please.

Tom

Isn't it unpatriotic to run a French tire on an American bike? :hystria:
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I could have sworn it was a 78 load rating on my rear tire. The tire seems to be wearing well...but it was the ride that really impressed me. It just felt a lot more stable and smoother in the transitions to the corners than any tires I'd tried previously. I'm not sure what the overall width is, but it fits.

As far as being a French company....I know they employ Americans at a very large tire factory in South Carolina...as long as They help Americans pay their bills, I can sleep at night.
 

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I got the rating from the web somewhere, so WTF do I know. The mfr's don't want to tell you, you have to dig for it or call a sales rep.

It's marked on the sidewall, should read "77H" or "78H" or similar. What does the "max load xxx at xx psi cold" marking say?

And yes, made in USA works for me, too bad Metzeler has outsourced to Brazil. Guess they ran out of room, they also make Pirellis in the German factory.

Tom
 

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I am running a 160/60-18 Metzler ME880 with NO problems on my 06FLHXI. I will admit it is tight, but it does fit w/o any modifications!
 

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Bob, Sweet SG. Metzeler lists what I believe is a reinforced 160/60R18M/C REINFTL 76V ME880 is this the one you are running? When you went to the 18 what did it do to the seat height?
 

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Hi Guys and Gals,
I have a 2006 Road Glide do I understand from the knowledge you all have I can put a 150-80-16 on the rear of my Road Glide.What about discussion on Met-vs-Pirelli-vs-Michelin.
 

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If you check this site, it has links to the tire manufacturers:
www.ama-cycle.org/roadride/tires.asp - 21k -
Metzler's own site shows the 150/80-16 bias ply at 71 and the radial at 72. that is for the "H"rating (up to 130mph) the higher speed rating (V) does not show the weight rating.

Avon and a few others have this size in a 77H. The Avon seems to be a little wider than other tires with the same size.
 
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