V-Twin Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Infidel
Joined
·
6,331 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

In the spirit of learning from the experiences of others, I would like to ask the seasoned riders to share lessons learned from the road, e.g., close calls (how did you avoid an accident?), accidents (what might have been done in hindsight?) and other relevant riding experiences.

Thanks in advance your your repsonse.

Regards,
wyodude
 

·
Founder/Administrator
Joined
·
1,315 Posts
Truth be known

Prior to picking up my 01 FLHRCI, I hadnt ridden a bike in YEARS. Prior to that, I had only ridden/owned rocket metrics. I have since logged over 8000 miles in about 8 months of riding.

I think the SINGLE most important thing that you can do for yourself is to sign up for the MSF (motorcycle safety foundation) Course in your area.

Check with the local colleges or do a search on the net for Motor cycle Safety Foundation course.

Their prices are reasonable and they offer two different courses based on rider experience. The Beginner Course is offered to Newby riders with less than 500 miles under their belt. They also provide the bike to ride and all safety equipment.

The Advanced Course is geared to those with 500+ miles under their belt and their own bike and equipment.

Statistics show that most accidents occur in intersections and riders that fail to brake or manuever properly when placed in a potential accident.

The MSF course teaches you how to combat BOTH through comprehensive classroom learning and a thorough riding course.

The big key to keeping upright is to use your front and rear brakes and watch the other a'holes on the road. Objects in the road have caused accidents as well but they will show you some effective ways to dodge that really work.

Prices on the beginner course range from $150-175 and advanced is usually under $90. The best thing is that your insurance company will give you a discount on your premiums!

Hope this helps
 

·
Infidel
Joined
·
6,331 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
dprice, HIPPO,

Thanks fellas.

Virginia offers Rider Training through its community college system. The beginners course is wildly popular. In northern VA the first class opening I could find is in September!

I got the last spot in a class offered in May, only 150 miles away.

I've already purchased and am currently reading:
The MSF's Guide to Motorcycling Excellence, and
Proficient Motorcycling by David L. Hough

Regards,

wyodude
 

·
Traveling Man
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
Wyodude, there are probably a million little tips that you pick up after you have been riding for years. We all take them for granted after awhile and forget to mention them to newer riders(like my wife). Only a couple of things come to mind right off the bat.
When no special motorcycle parking areas are available and you are forced to park with the cars, don't pull up all the way in the parking spot. If there is a car on each side of you, your bike can't be seen and some people see a open space and whip in there and hit your bike before they realize that it's there.
When parking in places other than on concrete, carry something to put under your sidestand to keep it from sinking into the ground. Even an asphalt parking spot can cause the sidestand to sink far enough to down your bike in the hot summer.
Carry an extra key on a separate key chain,when leaving town or going a great distance. I'll never forget the time that I whipped my key out of my pocket only to have it fall into the sewer grating.
There are many things that we all do that we do from experience that we don't even thing about. One thing that is a good habit to get into is just giving your bike a quick looking over before you ride. Look at things such as the brake pads, tire tread, tire pressure, oil level, lights working(especially headlight and brake light), belt condition,loose bolts, unclosed saddle bags etc. If you do this regularly you can skip a few things now and then but still reduce the SUPRISE factor down the road.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top