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How hard is it to relace a wheel? I have the stock 21" and would like to go with chrome spokes. Am I better off buying a new chrome spoke wheel, or is relacing a do-able project?
 

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Easy answer: Send your wheel to Rich Crawford at Detroit Wheelz. He will professionally relace and true your wheel for $35! I just had a rear wheel done by Rich 2 weeks ago. I sent him the spokes I wanted to use and it cost me $10 to ship each way......yours would probably be less to ship because it's lighter. He can get the spokes too if you like. He does outstanding work and it is the cheapest that you will find by far. His e-mail address is [email protected] .
 

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Discussion Starter #3
streetrod said:
Easy answer: Send your wheel to Rich Crawford at Detroit Wheelz. He will professionally relace and true your wheel for $35! I just had a rear wheel done by Rich 2 weeks ago. I sent him the spokes I wanted to use and it cost me $10 to ship each way......yours would probably be less to ship because it's lighter. He can get the spokes too if you like. He does outstanding work and it is the cheapest that you will find by far. His e-mail address is [email protected] .
Thanks. I'll look into that.

I'm still interested in how feasible it is to relace your own, though.
 

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It is very doable if you take your time. I laced my wheels a few years back, and again recently with s/s spokes. You will need to set up some kind of fixture to spin the rim on while your trueing it up. Make a "pointer" type indicator that you can set next to the wheel as you spin it, this will tell you which way the rim needs to go. Don't forget, the rim has to be trued on both axis, side to side and on center. Spin a little, lossen some spokes, tighten some opposite ones, sip your beer, spin a little more...you get the picture. Shouldn't take more than three beers per wheel. Hope this helps
 

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I would be careful in lacing a wheel. Getting spoke pattern correct, locating the hub within the rim, ensuring the roundness of the rim (up and down), and the actual trueing of the rim (side to side) can cause all sorts of headaches in ride and balance. Without a good stand to measure side to side and up and down, you are probably better off having a pro do it.
 

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I know this is an old thread but WTF.

I'm mindful of what SCUMBAg is saying, I get it. But wouldn't the worst problems be avoided by replacing one spoke (and nipple, I suppose) at a time? I'd do it on a fixture - the same one I use to balance whenever I change a tire. I figure that way it'd be simple to exactly duplicate the pattern and monitor roundness and truing along the way.

Adding my two cents here as I work through the wealth of lacing-related posts here. I've never laced a wheel before but I'm considering doing it since I've got a wheel with a decent rim and hub whose spokes have gone to hell, finish-wise. Florida can do that.

Comments welcome.
 

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Just thinking about lacing a wheel gives me a headache,, lol.
Good luck,,, sounds like you have a handle on it,,, that stand you have is perfect for replacing spokes,,, the 1 at a time sounds like a good idea.
 

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I used to do them, 16 inch rims onto old iron head hubs. But I was anything but good at it. I used to do them with an axel in a vise. Then use a coat hanger bolted to the bench as an indicator.
 

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I remember making the clutch spring compressor for my ironhead sporty,, way back when,, lol necessity is the mother of invention,,
Just a reminder,, there were very few Harley specific tools availble to do most jobs,, the dealer wouldnt sell them to you,, no aftermarket tools were available back then.. a person needed motivation and ingenuity..
 

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Lace the wheel yourself. Just about every harley manual explains how. The process called out by harley is really simple. Just about all 16 wheels lace the same, same for 19" narrow glide hubs, and 21 wide glide hubs. Loos lace the rim, take it to a wheel smith. Your local *** bike shop (non dealership) will probably be the best bet to get the wheel trued. The import bike tech probably won't know the correct offset for the size rim and hub that you. Make a copy of that page in the manual for the tech.
 

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Turboprop is correct. It is in the manual. I have done about a half dozen. I always have the manual for the correct offset. Not all harley rims run on center of hub.
Buchanan's Spoke & Rim, Inc
I use this place for spokes. I always buy a couple extra spokes and nipples and this place will sell you them separately. I have rounded a few off but they were junk from JP, I never had any problems with Buchanan spokes. Make sure you lube threads. If you don't have a truing stand the axle in a vise will work or take off your front fender and use your forks. Be patient the first one I did I must have had 40 hours in, I was using a dial indicator, trying to get if perfect. Use a wire and your eye and you will be close enough. If you check some new rims you will be surprised at the acceptable tolerance from the factor. Get a couple of different style QUALITY spoke wrenches. You can get a feel for how tight they will be when you done by lubing and then tightening your current spokes a little before you cut them out. I use a bolt cutter to cut them out. Mark a few holes and their corresponding holes in the hub, then take a picture to help you get the pattern correct when putting new spokes in. Good luck.
 

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Then use a coat hanger bolted to the bench as an indicator.
You were just a hi tech ******* back then, weren't you.

Weird. I can't say red neck?

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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My first truing stand was made with 2x4s and an old spoke held in place with a fence staple for an indicator. I used feeler gauges to measure the run out. Yep I was poor too. Now I don't have a truing stand. Is that an indicator that I may be poorer? Nope, I just haven't needed one in the last decade or two, but the time is coming.
 

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One of the very first jobs I had in a Harley shop was lacing the wheel! No one liked doing them, I got pretty good at it.
know how I learned?
The book!
It was pretty simple really.
One over four? or one over three cant remember.
But it is dead simple.
BTDT
Don't be scared of it at all.
 
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