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Im not realy sure where to post this, but is there a trick to bleeding the front brakes after changing a line? I bled the crap outta them and i still cant seem to get the old feel back. They grab, just not as sharply as they used to. Im guessing im gunna have to vaccum bleed them, but any insight would be great. Its a 2007 street bob with braided lines, if it matters.
 

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Ironbutt
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1978terrorizer said:
Im not realy sure where to post this, but is there a trick to bleeding the front brakes after changing a line? I bled the crap outta them and i still cant seem to get the old feel back. They grab, just not as sharply as they used to. Im guessing im gunna have to vaccum bleed them, but any insight would be great. Its a 2007 street bob with braided lines, if it matters.
Did you try doing a search first? There have been many threads about brake bleeding and tricks. Here's one http://www.v-twinforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=105666&highlight=brake+bleeding.
 

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The Anti-RUB
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The vacuums method works well. I went the manual route when I changed the fluid in my front and rear brakes. I pump the brake lever a couple times to build up pressure and hold (squeeze), open the bleeder screw a quarter turn until the brake lever almost bottoms out, then close the bleeder screw. Its pretty quick (less then a second), so timing is key. Do this a couple times till you don't see any more bubbles. If your just replacing fluid, then do it till you see clean fluid come out the bleeder. The key is to keep pressure in the brake line. Also helps to take the plastic end of a screw driver and tap from the caliper all the way up the brake line to the master cylinder. That helps get any stuck air bubbles up. Also make sure you have the correct size clear hose (3/16ths) to attach to the bleeder screw. Too big (3/8ths) and it could allow air into the line giving a false indication of air in your brake lines. Also, make sure the open end of the bleeder tube is submerged in brake fluid, otherwise when you close the bleeder screw air will climb back up the bleeder tube etc making it harder to judge if there is air in the line or not. Good luck...
 

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1978terrorizer said:
Im not realy sure where to post this, but is there a trick to bleeding the front brakes after changing a line? I bled the crap outta them and i still cant seem to get the old feel back. They grab, just not as sharply as they used to. Im guessing im gunna have to vaccum bleed them, but any insight would be great. Its a 2007 street bob with braided lines, if it matters.
Type speedbleeders into the search and you will find a solution to manually bleeding the brakes. They worked for me and I have no regrets installing them.

I ordered three so I could do both fronts and the rear one too. ('03 FLHT)
 

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When i went to a stainless line i tried all the usual methods including the vacuum pump, no good. What got the job done was reverse bleeding using a hand pump oil can.
 

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snap said:
When i went to a stainless line i tried all the usual methods including the vacuum pump, no good. What got the job done was reverse bleeding using a hand pump oil can.
me too, could not get it to bleed anyway I tried, pumped about five times from the caliper with the oil can an I had brakes, wish I would have figured that out about 3 hours worth of bleeding before that.
 

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If you have the bars turned so the master cylinder is level and the cover is off, try putting the cover on and turning the bars full left and right and bleeding while at both positions. This has worked for me. Just make sure you don't run the master cylinder empty while the cover is on.
 

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Bleeding Brake Fluid

:hmmm:

I just replaced the all of the brake lines and the manifold underneith the bottom triple tree on my 05 Road Glide and still had a spongy brake lever after I thought all of the air had been pushed out. Here is what I found with my setup. Little did I realize that I had not checked (opened and closed) all of the Banjo Bolt fittings. It will release any last remaining air bubbles in the entire system.

If you have a stock set-up, then this would only include the Banjo fitting on the handle bar at the master cylinder. And also each of the Banjo bolts at the top of each caliper.

If you went to a modified set-up, like I did with braided stainless lines, then you will have to let the air out at each of the AN3 fitting junctions as well. That would be an additional one at the input to the manifold, both exit points of the manifold (4 places), inputs to each caliper (2 places each - AN3 and Banjo). Hope this helps.
 

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Roadie said:
:hmmm:

I just replaced the all of the brake lines and the manifold underneith the bottom triple tree on my 05 Road Glide and still had a spongy brake lever after I thought all of the air had been pushed out. Here is what I found with my setup. Little did I realize that I had not checked (opened and closed) all of the Banjo Bolt fittings. It will release any last remaining air bubbles in the entire system.

If you have a stock set-up, then this would only include the Banjo fitting on the handle bar at the master cylinder. And also each of the Banjo bolts at the top of each caliper.

If you went to a modified set-up, like I did with braided stainless lines, then you will have to let the air out at each of the AN3 fitting junctions as well. That would be an additional one at the input to the manifold, both exit points of the manifold (4 places), inputs to each caliper (2 places each - AN3 and Banjo). Hope this helps.

What he said.

Had to bleed every connection on my wife's Triumph to get a good feel in the lever.

Sometimes it helps to leave the caliper hanging straight down overnight.
 

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duke76 said:
me too, could not get it to bleed anyway I tried, pumped about five times from the caliper with the oil can an I had brakes, wish I would have figured that out about 3 hours worth of bleeding before that.

man I know that one! I spent that plus a couple getting mine done when I went to braided lines ..... got there but what a PITA !!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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This may sound a little strange but I have a piece of clear tubing that I press on over the bleeder. I pump the line full level with the master cylinder. One normal bleed pump and close later and I am dumping the fluid in the line back in the can and I am done.
 

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Here is the way I did it. From a no pressure pull to about a 1/8 to 1/4" pull to firm on front brake. And this is a one man (or woman) job.

And this is after cussing the way the Dyna manual instructs.

Ingredients:

(1) 16 0z drinking water bottle (empty and dry).

1 length of radiator drain hose bought from AutoZone in a pre-cut packaged length (about $1.99 or so).

1 bottle of DOT 5 fluid

1 zip tie

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Fill the water bottle to about 1/8th full with new fluid and set aside.

Open master cylinder cover, and top it off if needed.

Open bleeder valve about 1/2 to 3/4 turn and leave open.

Run one end of radiator tube ever bleeder valve so it completely covers the end and the wrench cuts (don't worry about locking the valve back down later at the end of the job. The hose won't be on at that time).

Drop the other end of the tube into the water bottle so that it sits well below the fluid. Add fluid to the bottle if necessary.

Situate the bottle inside a bowl, another bottle, on top of some bricks, or whatever it takes to make sure that it doesn't tip or move around while you are at work.

Remove the brake lever, and set aside. Basically just pop the split ring off and gently tap out the pin. Not a big deal, and the tool to open the split ring can be bought at the auto parts for as little as $5 to as much as $20, depending on what you want to spend.

Take the end of a nut driver (square end), a large size allen wrench, or anything with the general diameter oft he plunger inside, and enough length to get a good stroke on it by hand. Begin to compress and release the master cylinder plunger. You should see some bubbling in the bottle and probably some in the master cylinder, as well.

Continue to compress and release plunger (just as your brake lever would be doing it, only you are going a bit deeper), and add fluid to top off the master cylinder, as needed.

After you have run the master cylinder down to half-way, and topped it off twice, go ahead and do it once more. By now, you should have run about an inch (more or less) of fluid into your catch bottle. And you have (hopefully) been watching to make sure that the hose inside the bottle has stayed "under-the-fluid" the entire time.

Now, leaving everything as it is, put the master cylinder cover back on and replace the brake handle and reset the pin. You can do the snap ring later. Just re-hinge the lever.

Depress lever about 1/2 the way, and zip tie it to that depth. No deeper, no shallower.

Remover the hose from the bleeder valve, and tighten valve back up to spec.

Cut zip tie, and pump the brake handle up about 10 or 12 times. It should start to firm up.

Remove master cylinder cover, top off the fluid as needed, and put it back on. Replace split ring on brake lever pin.

Clean up mess.

Ride.
 

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thanks for the great advice...but seeing as it was about a year and a half ago when this thread was posted its probably fixed by now....great job digging it up though...and it does seem like a lot of work your way...
 
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