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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My '05 Roadking is oiling badly through the valves guides. I assumed the dealer would give me the run around and then declare that a quart or two in 1000 miles is normal. Mine has huge deposits on the plug and is getting hard to start. It only has 4000 miles on it, and I don't want it to carbon up and stick a valve.

So for a few bucks for seals, I figure I'll just do them myself. Only my rear cylinder was burning oil, so I started there. I notice the book says to lube everything and becareful not to cock the seal. I could see that the old seal on the intake was not centered and not sealing around the stem. I could visible see this before taking the spring off. Basically, it's like running with no seal at all. Which makes sense considering the rate of oil consumption.

I left the heads on and did the work on the bike. I used the plastic guide tool, but the seal doesn't really pilot itself. I can see this is a bad design. I'm not sure why you want the spring seat to be integral with the valve seal, but when you push it on, the rubber end of the seal pulls itself out of round very easily. It just doesn't locate itself on the guide like you'd expect. You try to push the seal to get the spring seat down without seperating the two. It takes enough force that the rubber distorts.

So I only finished the exhaust and I'm not sure the intake is worth doing. It is alot of work doing it without pulling the heads. On the other hand if I pull the heads I'm seriously considering putting on something with a different design. So she is sitting in pieces tonight while I decide what to do......I just don't think this style of seal is ever going to work. For the labor I've already done, I really want it to not leak. Hell I even had to take the front motor mount loose to get the bolts out of the rocker cover. If I pull the intake and exhaust, and heads, I'm half way into the whole motor...

Seems like you could machine the guides for an old style seal. Small block Chevy's work great with old style seals and beehive springs. If not, then maybe I should put on some 2004 heads? Maybe something aftermarket? At this point I rather spend some money and get some decent heads to avoid repeating all the work.

What do you Harley experts think?
 

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If your biks is a 2005 it should be under factory warranty. This would be something a dealer would do for free on a 2005 bike. If you do try it yourself, make sure you use the new orange and black seals not the all black ones. Harley has revised the seals but some dealers still have the old ones in stock. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's some good info, thanks! I really just want the stock motor to not use oil. I didn't plan to change cams and such. However, I'm not convinced these new seals will work. So I'm trying to decide if it's worth a head upgrade while I've got it apart.

I guess I would be convinced it's worth finshing what I have started, if I heard that the '06s are running these seals with success. Anybody had the new seals installed and it actually fixed the problem? I don't have much faith, and I really don't want to do all the work again.
 

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If you are using the orange seals I don't think you will have continued problems. So far I have not seen a set of '06 heads that had the orange seals stock from the factory. We have done MANY '05 heads and have had no complaints with the seals. I think you will be good to go. You are using the little plastic protector they gave you with the updated seals right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good news! I was a worried about this project being a failure. I was suprised to find I had to lower the front motor mount to get the bolts out of the rocker cover. I guess you get faster at this after your first one?

I am using the plastic protector and I'm sure that helps. The book also cautions against compressing the spring too much at install. I'm doing this with the heads on. Maybe that is the hard way?

What I don't like is the way the seal locates itself on the guide. I don't think it always goes on straight. I bet this is why only some leak. I wonder why the '06s don't leak? You are saying they still have the old seals? Maybe they changed the guide so that it is more idiot proof when installing the seal?

Thanks for the tips, I was really getting discouraged. I still find it hard to believe that oil will go between the aluminum head and the spring seat with the force of the spring pushing them together. I think you need a better way to have the running surface of the seal square and true with the valve stem so that it stays round and doesn't leak.
 

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1.) yes you get faster
2.) That is the hard way
3.) yes, at least the early '06's still have the old seal, I believe they changed to the new seal during the '06 production run. And I have found the same problems with the '06 heads. A percentage will leak.
4.) the guides have changed and have a radius at the top, this is believed to help during the seal installation.
 
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