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Discussion Starter #21
Finally got a chance to spend a few hours on my bike and made a little progress. I got the stock trans removed; main drive gear and bearing out. Case is now empty except for the countershaft bearing. I need to clean up the drive pulley side of the case before removing that bearing to prevent any of the crud caked on the case from getting inside it.

I took a pic of the empty case, but didn't go crazy documenting the process since it's spelled out in the manual. 20191006_203339.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Had a couple hours this afternoon, so I removed the countershaft bearing and cleaned up the case. Also poured the trans oil into the waste oil bucket and found a couple big chunks of metal. Not sure qhat they came from. It's very slightly magnetic.

Once upon a time, this bike ate its trans dipstick. I never saw any pieces from it, though I removed the side cover looking for it at the time. I wonfer if what I found is pieces of that. You can see scrapes inside the cases where it went through. 20191007_164542.jpg
 

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Could very well be.

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Discussion Starter #25
6 speed gearset is installed. It's pretty straightforward and essentially follows the procedure for installing the stock gearset. The only thing noteworthy in my case is that the alignment roll pin between the trans case and the trap door came out with the trap door. A new roll pin is provided with the gearset, but there is no mention of it in the instructions provided with the kit. THIS ROLL PIN IS NOT FOR TRAP DOOR ALIGNMENT! I discovered this by stupidly trying to use it for that. It doesn't fit. Tap the stick one out of the trap door and reuse it.

As if right now, the gearset is in and trap door torqued. Verified all sliding gears slide freely and both shafts rotate smoothle and freely. Neutral works as do all the gears.

Next up is install the forks, shafts, shift drum and adjust shifter pawl.
 

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What? No pics????

Perhaps we should bring back public flogging. :)

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Discussion Starter #27
Well, I didn't think sliding the gearset in was worthy of pics.... It's a pretty straightforward operation.

This afternoon's adventures:were less straightforward. The 3 stock shift forks installed without fuss, exactly as the stockers do, using the original shaft.

The 4th shift fork, for the OD gear, was a different story. This fork goes on its own shaft, which is provided in the Ultima kit. The Baker fork has a slightly smaller bore than the Ultima fork, so it won't slide on the Ultima shaft. I considered using the Ultima fork for that one gear. But, I paid good $$ for the Baker parts, and I want the Baker shift quality and reliability. The Ultima fork is bronze; the Baker fork is steel and a very well made piece. See earlier pics in this thread for shift fork comparison. There's no contest. So, I decided to put the 4th fork's shaft in my lathe and turn it down enough to get the fork on it. I took about .005" off the shaft, only for the portion that will ride on the shift fork. There is a long bushing that supports the shaft; I left the original diameter in this area so as not to affect the fit of the shaft on the bushing. I'll post a pic of the shaft in the lathe chuck during machining. The fork fits on the shaft a little bit looser than the original did, but will be fine.

However, with the 4th fork on the gear, the shaft wouldn't go through the fork's bore. After messing around with Dykem marking compound on various surfaces of the fork, I finally determined that the Baker fork didn't sit down on the gear enough for the shaft and the bore to line up. Sliding both forks on the shaft, holdling them tightly together I figured out that the Baker fork had a smaller radius than the Ultilma fork, and so it was sitting up higher. This caused the center of the shift fork bore to be higher than the shaft. A little work with a file and some emery cloth solved that. So, all the forks are in and the shift drum test fitted. Prior to the drum going on, I shifted through all the gears, rotating the shafts to make sure everything works.

I'll post up a few pics tomorrow of the 4th fork and how all that goes together.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Here are a few pix. I "test fit" the shift drum yesterday after getting the shift forks squared away. I found that the detent spring interfered with the captive washer on the stock bolt (the Ultima instructions specify use of tje stock bolts). I ground the washer flat on one side in an attempt to clear the spring, and while this worked to get the bolt in amd run down until the washe contacted the pillow block, there wasn't enough clearance for a socket to torque the bolt. An allen head bolt with an AN size washer is needed here. No problem. The trans kit comes with mew trap door bolts; the stock 1/4-20 trap door bolts are only about .100 shorter, I'll use one of those. Well, I forgot about the counterbore for the alignment dowel rings. So when I went to torque the sucker (9 ft/lbs), it was only engaged in 2 threads and it pulled them right out of the trans case. ****. Obviously, a longer bolt is needed. Ultima provides 6 new clutch release cover bolts, so I took one of the stock cover bolts and cut it to the appropriate length (1.45") and used it. These are Grade 8 bolts, so I feel good about that solution. See the pic of tje shift drum pillow block with the 1 allen head bolt. Do not leave this bolt too long: these are not blind holes, so a long bolt can contact the gear right under the bolt hole.

I also discovered that the snap ring provided with the kit to retain the shifter pawl is thicker than the stock one, so it wouldn't engage in the groove in the pawl shaft (where the pawl comes through the case; through the seal; then a washer, and the whole mess is retained by this little snap ring. I briefly thought maybe I should have cut the pawl bushing a little bit, which Ultima's instructions say you "might" need to do as one of the first steps. It Didn't seem to me that this was needed (and anyway, it's the Baker pawl), so I Didn't do it. Now I started thinking maybe I should have, and do I have to take this F-ing gearset back out again... Then I picked up the stock snap ring and realized it is about half the thickness. That one went right on.

The 3 bolts are the stock 1/4-20 trap door bolt; the stock clutch release cover bolt; and the Ultima clutch release cover bolt. Note that the Ultima clutch release cover bolts are a little longer than the stock ones. This is required because they go through the thicker trap door before engaging with the threads in the case. 20191012_144515.jpg 20191012_144522.jpg 20191012_151215.jpg
 

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Great write up.

Thanks.

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Discussion Starter #31
Spent about an hour and a half so far today working on this. I am going at a pretty slow pace, for several reasons: I have a cold, and so am pretty tired; I'm not in much of a hurry, though I would like to get this bike back together - but there's a lot more to do before that happens (see my "crashed" thread); I've run into several unexpected things so far and don't want to miss something.

There are numerous shortcomings in the Ultima instructions. I've pointed out one or two already. Today's are: they tell you to adjust the shifter pawl, and specifically in which direction there should be no freeplay (that being in the downshift direction from 3rd to 2nd). However, they don't tell you HOW to adjust the pawl. I looked in the factory service manual for this info and there was nothing there on pawl adjustment. Having looked pretty closely at the pawl before installation, and comparing it to the stock pawl, I knew there were no clues there. I decided to look on Baker's site at their available instructions. There, I found the procedure as well as the note that '01 and later FL models (as well as Softails after '99, I think) don't have a pawl adjustment. Install it and forget it.

The next shortcoming is: they tell you to install the "supplied throwout bearing." Ok.... The supplied throwout bearing lacks an oil slinger like the stock one has. Granted, that oil slinger isn't doing all that much in the side cover, though I'm sure it helps lube the trap door bearings. I Didn't like the idea of ditching the oil slinger, and my stock throwout bearing was replaced not all that long ago. So I decided to use it instead. Well... When I went to bolt on the side cover I discovered why the supplied bearing lacks an oil slinger: the Ultima mainshaft nut is beefier than the stocker; the bearing and shaft end are further "out", or "to the right side of the bike," if you know what I mean by that, and the Ultima door is much thicker than the stock one. The bottom line is: the added thickness of the oil slinger and the its seat cause the bearing to protrude further into the cover than stock. This prevents the cover from seating on the trap door. Toss the stock bearing, use the supplied one, and the cover goes right on.

The instructions also tell you to use the supplied 1/4-20 bolts for the side cover. They don't mention, and I didn't notice, that there are 3 pairs of slightly different length bolts. I didn't get lucky and accidentally put them in the right places, so the first one I screwed in stopped before the head contacted the cover. That isn't going to work. So I pulled it out, took the cover back off and looked in the hole expecting to see boogered up threads or something. Nope, it's a blind hole and looks very well machined. So I took a welding rod and stuck it in the hole, using my thumbnail to measure the depth of each hole. I found the top two are through holes. The left two are blind and the same depth; the right two are also blind and the same depth as eachbother, but different than the left bbn ones. So you have to know this and pay attention to which bolts go where. Pix to follow in a separate post.
 

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Paying attention to the details is what makes all the difference when it comes to successful results.Whether you do it all the time as a profession or for yourself,the end result is what proves your competence and skills.Thanks for keeping us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Here are the pix I prominsed:

This first one is of the stock vs Ultima throwout bearing:
20191013_145050.jpg
Obviously, the stocker has the oil slinger. I guess the gears sling around plenty of oil, but I'm a little concerned about the oil slinger going missing. But, the cover won't fit with it, so it goes.

The next couple show the differences between the two trap doors.
20191013_151044.jpg 20191013_151057.jpg

Next up, a view from the top looking down at each trap door. This shows how much further the Ultima shafts protrude into the side cover, making it necessary to ditch the oil slinger:
20191013_151111.jpg 20191013_151127.jpg

Here's the side cover with the 3 pairs of different length bolts in it.
20191013_152329.jpg

Last is a shot of the bottom of the trap door, under the side cover. The yellow circle is highlighting what I think is a drain plug. I haven't taken it out yet to confirm that, but it looks exactly like the pair of magnetic drain plugs supplied with the kit, so I assume that's what it is. Not sure why it's a good idea to have that there; the pipe will prevent ever using it, and it strikes me as a potential leak.
20191013_193514.jpg

That same picture also shows the 4 bolts that also serve to mount the stock exhaust bracket. That will obviously not work anymore. Not sure what I'm going to do to support the exhaust in that spot, but it's going to need something. In fact, the exhaust is another item of minor concern: It was very close to the side cover with the stock trap door. It's going to be closer now. Hopefully it can rotate out a little bit without affecting the seal at the heads.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Oh, then there's the F-ing speedo sensor location in the trap door. Ultima provides what the refer to as a speedo sensor plug, which isn't really a plug. It's a block-off plate with a gasket. I'm not real confident in this part's ability to resist leaking. A proper plug with an O-ring would give me a lot more confidence. In any case, they provide a little allen head bolt to secure it, so I bolted it on.eft the stock speedo sensor in the stock location. We'll see how the speedo works.

The real issue with this damned plug is that it interferes with the oil spout and its vent fitting. See picture below. This is WITH the Baker oil spout spacer.
20191013_173823.jpg
I don't know if I bought the Ultima spacer if it would be thick enough to clear the obstacles or not. I ordered the spacer from Baker while ordering the rest of their parts that went into this trans. Never gave it a thought that it could be different. I'm going to try to find out what the thickness is of the Ultima spacer. I have a feeling I'm going to wind up making one.

The fitting you see is an AN fitting; I made a braided steel vent hose when I built the motor. I still have the stock formed hose and its fittings, so I put that in and tried it and it interferes even worse. Another thought was to maybe use a right angle fitting, or maybe a 45° fitting and see if it will clear. But then I have to make a new hose, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #36

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Discussion Starter #37
The Ultima oil spout spacer showed up yesterday afternoon and got installed today. I thought 15/16" was going to be a little more than necessary, but I was wrong. Every bit of it is needed for the vent fitting to clear the trap door. I had to ditch my AN fitting equipped, braided stainless hose, because the flats on the AN fittings hit the trap door, making it impossible to install the hose. I still had the stock formed rubber (neoprene, really) hose and hose barb fittings, so I went to put that on instead, and found that the hose is now too short with the spout spaced out almost an inch. So, I used some 3/8" fuel line and made up a vent hose. It's going to need a little P-clamp on the trans top cover bolt to hold it in place. With that, it will look fine. 20191016_143855.jpg

Still outstanding is an exhaust bracket, and reassemble the primary. The primary cover needs some thread repair, and I'm going to replace the oil pan with a Baker +1 pan, which I'll do before I put the primary back together.
 

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Found another tool for you, since you are using lumber a cheap jack would be most useful:


I have one that looks identical and I think cost me $35 including shipping more than 10 years ago. I know, lumber scraps are cheap, but like some of my other tools, this one has been very useful. The risers on top of the platform are fairly worthless, but the jack works well across the frame tubes and for lifting wheels into place when I have the bike on the bigger frame lift. Wish I had room for a lift table.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Found another tool for you, since you are using lumber a cheap jack would be most useful:


I have one that looks identical and I think cost me $35 including shipping more than 10 years ago. I know, lumber scraps are cheap, but like some of my other tools, this one has been very useful. The risers on top of the platform are fairly worthless, but the jack works well across the frame tubes and for lifting wheels into place when I have the bike on the bigger frame lift. Wish I had room for a lift table.
I have a scissor jack I ise to get the bike up in the air. But since I knew it would be spending some time with the back wheel off the ground and the swingarm off, etc., and also because I knew I'd be putting some heavy torque on some fasteners while it was up in the air, I set the bike on the 6x6 block with a 2x4 on top of that for a nice, stable base. I don't like to do a lot of work on the jack. In addition to that, I replaced the hanebars. I took the tie-down straps securing the bike to the lift off (theybwere wrapped around the handlebars). So it needed a good, stable base. The 6x6 + 2x4 provides that.

Plus, it freed up the jack to jack up a little bit on the trans when reassembling the swingarm. This helped with aligning the whole thing in the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I have a couple more things to add to this. Ultima provides what looks like a clutch adjusting screw, but I have no idea what year or model it belongs to. It doesn't fit the stock clutch for my '02. I have a Bandit Sportsman clutch, and it uses its own adjusting screw. I broke the end of it that has the allen head socket because I didn't realize that the 6 speed puts the pushrod in a different spot, so when I tried to loosen the locknut, it was under a lot of spring pressure because the clutch was partially disengaged (I hadn't changed the adjustment position of the screw, just bolted the pressure plate back on as it came off). I forgot that Bandit uses its own screw, so the one I waited a week for from HD and spent an hour and 15 minutes round trip driving to pick up this morning doesn't work. So..... I still can't button up the primary!

I did make an exhaust support bracket today. The Ultima trap door is so thick, the stock bracket - which was broken on my bike anyway - won't work. I chose the lower trans-to-motor bolt to attach my new bracket. This worked out very well. I used 1/4" x 1-1/4 steel strap to make the bracket. There's a flat machined edge by the bolt hole. My bracket is held in iplace by the single bolt, but the square edge of the bracket locks in against that machined edge, making this bracket very secure. I spent a little time with the torch and a hammer and my anvil, and got a pretty well shaped bracket hammered out (literally). I'll post pics up separately, I'm typing this on my computer; I'll upload the pix from my phone. One minor complication with this: The pipe is now "out" away from the frame further than before. Consequently, the muffler doesn't line up with the hangar. It's "out" away form the wheel about a full inch, maybe a little more. I'm going to have to decide if I'm going to heat and bend the head pipes a little bit so the muffler will line up without putting strain on the head pipes; or if I think there's enough movement in the joint between the muffler and the collector to just push the muffler over and install the bracket; then tighten the clamp and not worry about it. "Pipe strain" is a pretty big deal in power plant pipe systems and can lead to all kinds of problems, like leaks and cracks. Exhaust pipes are no different.....
 
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