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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Stupid question....with a Kury Hypercharger and other similar open end scoop air cleaners (albeit they do have a butterfly/trap door), is there much risk when getting caught in rain? Seems pretty easy to start sucking water into those things. I like the appearance of them, not my absolute favorite, but they're better than the stock a/c.

Any other nice looking a/c units anyone can recommend?
 

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I can't speak for the other exposed element air cleaners; but the hypercharger will run all day in the rain...if needed I'll tell you how I know:badmood:
 

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Since the late 80's the AC element suppliers have offered a 10 micron filter for any use but mainly offroad stuff. Water does not pass through them. Wonder why this subject keeps coming up. :blink:
 

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Believe it or not but there is that function in my Cosmos software. The best place to find function relations is on the Nasa site.
Panman
 

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IronButt
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This is respect to another post but I thought you might have that. It was about moving the iat sensor into the a/c to trick the ecm into adding fuel, I think it would be easier just to tune it but I did have a chart at one time but have long lost it. Thanks
 

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I would think to do that would take a map program beyond the ECM's capability. The best way to get all you want is to talk a company in to providing ECM's with AT LEAST 2 more sensors and a capability to add more. ICT in Denver was working on it. I saw the program for my diesel powerstroke back at Hytech and was amazed at how many correlated functions were achievable. Harley has some built in blocks to achieve a great tune but cheating is always possible.:brows:
 

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I've been researching this air cleaner for quite some time. The general concensus is that it's a nice looking air cleaner, and is a definite improvement over stock, but that's about it.

It's performance potential has not been proven except on the dyno. No one, to my knowledge, has done wind tunnel testing to see if it performs well at highway speeds. Due to their design, with openings on the lower part of the unit (for slow speed operation), it would seem that as the air is moving quickly past and through the air cleaner, some of it is exiting through the lower openings. This would create a "siphon" effect which may be hindering airflow into the carb's throat in the same way that a siphon-feed spray guns works. Maybe the filter helps reduce that effect... I'm not sure.

I believe that it's designed to be like the phony "flycatcher injector" air cleaners made for car engines. They look "cool", but don't really have any advantage over standard high-flow air cleaners.

As for me, I'll stick with the race-proven S&S teardrop air cleaner w/ K&N filter. I've seen almost every race bike using them, but personally, I have never seen any winning racers using the Hypercharger.

Either way, if you aren't racing it, and don't mind it pushing your right leg way out, then go for it! Try to use a K&N filter and then get it dyno tuned. That will make a huge difference! :)
 

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I was told by someone who I respect and miss a great deal, that this is a moot point on these air cleaners and such.

You can not go at a fast enough speed to make a difference. Something about the CFM an engine draws into the intake track, the speed you would have to travel to overcome, and add to that, is not obtainable.

I use a Doherty Power Pac and love the little slip in intake track to create an even flow into the intake.

These use a K&N filter. I have run it bare and with a cover and I really cant tell a difference. Nor did it show up in the TCFI logs, or at least that I could tell.

I can tell you I ran 100 miles in a TORRENTIAL downpour, bare element, and it did wash the red oil out of it, and I was concerned on water issues but the bike never missed a beat. I since have bought a filter thong made to cover the top front third of the open element and carry it in my bag. It is a cool gidget to have and leaves 2/3 of your element open while protecting it from rain in the area you need to.

Don't know about the 10 micron comment either, but you get any material saturated with water, and draw air through it, you are going to draw water with it.

If oil can puke out through it, water can certainly draw back through.
 

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LAF said:
I was told by someone who I respect and miss a great deal, that this is a moot point on these air cleaners and such.

You can not go at a fast enough speed to make a difference. Something about the CFM an engine draws into the intake track, the speed you would have to travel to overcome, and add to that, is not obtainable.

I use a Doherty Power Pac and love the little slip in intake track to create an even flow into the intake.

These use a K&N filter. I have run it bare and with a cover and I really cant tell a difference. Nor did it show up in the TCFI logs, or at least that I could tell.

I can tell you I ran 100 miles in a TORRENTIAL downpour, bare element, and it did wash the red oil out of it, and I was concerned on water issues but the bike never missed a beat. I since have bought a filter thong made to cover the top front third of the open element and carry it in my bag. It is a cool gidget to have and leaves 2/3 of your element open while protecting it from rain in the area you need to.

Don't know about the 10 micron comment either, but you get any material saturated with water, and draw air through it, you are going to draw water with it.

If oil can puke out through it, water can certainly draw back through.

Where did you get the rain cover (filter thong)?
 
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