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we have all seen it and that is road rage and agressive drivers, not a good thing. especially on your favorite Harley. yes i know when some doe head cuts you off or tail gates you we feal like caring a big log chain and giving a good wack across the hood. so you tell me, we are a nice target so what is the best thing to do? do we have any stories?
 

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There really isn't much you can do about jerko drivers.
They got four tons around them to your seven hundred pounds.
Move over and let them by.
It's the lousy drivers who piss me off. Never use turn signals, ride over middle line, crowd you in your lane etc etc.
You just have to be a better driver than everyone else on the road. I have been hooked on scoots for some thirty years and I say the best thing you can do is keep a cool head.
Losing your temper isn't going to help anything!
There has ben many times when I would have liked to have thrown a brick through someones windshield but just tell myself,"Keep going asshole, your day will come"
 

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Living in the land of the vacationing gray hairs, and international tourists (Fort Lauderdale FL) almost anytime I venture towards the beaches I consider myself invisible, because I feel like I am the way cages do the oposing left turn trick and merge-into-your-lane maneuver.
It is not worth trying to get even, or standing your ground/lane, because even though you are more than likely in the right, it would be no fun being 'dead right'.
Let the blind idiots have the right of way, and live to ride another day.
 

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I'm pretty easygoing and tend to avoid confrontation when I'm trying to have a good time, but I think it's a matter of perception.
As long as one perceives it to be accidental or motivated by simple stupidity there is no point in letting it ruin your day.
 

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The bad thing about using ball bearings, nuts, bolts, chains, golf balls, and etc. is that if you do cause an accident, it's all on you. The cage driver pleads ignorance and you get your balls busted cause you lost your cool. I've been riding for a lot of years on a bunch of differant bikes and no matter where I go or what I ride there's always some a-hole that wants my lane. They don't give a crap and you'd be hard pressed to find many non-bikers that are sympathetic to your plight. So stay cool, keep your hardware in your pocket and be aware of the other guy. Oh yeah, RIDE!

Dave
 

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Road Rage

I try to keep a cool head.But living in N.Y.C. it isn't easy,If I get cut off by some dickhead I catch them at the next light & kick thier driver's door & curse them out "they could have killed me". Once some guy cut my friend off & he got in front of the guy & boxed him in, the guy got out & pulled a knife,you never saw me try to get my kickstand down faster.We wound up beating the guy up with our helmets lol till the cops came. no charges filed we just wanted to go home lol
 

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Road Rage

Slamin Sammy,






The way to handle the problem is to stay cool, You only got 650 to 700 lbs. to have for proctection vrs. 2to 4 tons.
I have used the ball bearings , and they wokk. If you do use them, get out of there quickly, because you will be held responsible if the cage does go into an accident.
You make the decision, but it is easier to let the CHUMP go and continue your ride.
 

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You just have to learn how to out-smart them and laugh it off. I recall one incident when I was two-up and enjoying the ride when I noticed a puddle of water across the road ahead. Simultaneously, I heard the reving up of a pick-up engine that was not too far behind me. It was obvious that he intended to catch up with me just in time to splash me.
He did, we got wet! First reaction was where's the crowbar, but by the time we caught up to him at the next stop light, we were laughing so hard I was having a hard time keeping the bike upright. That's when I learned that it is much easier to laugh it off! Who knows if he had a pistol in his lap just waiting for us to flip him off! We got dry pretty quick!

Cheers
 

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Just as a matter of interest and to present another point of view, this is a copy of an article I got today in the weekly NZMSF e-mail.




Pondering the meaning of life and road rage:

When someone drives badly and places their life at risk, many riders
react by getting into an argument with the errant driver.

The idea, the annoyed rider will say, is to change the attitude of that
driver and make sure he never risks any motorcyclist's life again.

The trouble is, where the problem has arisen because of the motorist's
incompetence or carelessness, such an exchange between driver and motorist
is unlikely to change anything one whit.

We all recognise that mistakes are made. This is precisely why we preach
that you must always leave yourself a clear exit path. You allow for
one, and you use it. That driver made a mistake, and because you made
allowances, nothing happened. It was a non-incident.

I would go further to say that, in this sort of situation, at the moment
that you, the rider, and he, the driver, realised that he goofed, you
are both in full agreement. You think to yourself "****! That was too
close!" He thinks to himself "Whoa! That was close."

Only later do you add "Stupid moke should pay more attention. What an
asshole!" This still matches his "I gotta be more careful. I'll bet he
thinks I'm an asshole."

Full agreement on both sides. Not only did nothing painful happen, but
there's no need to discuss that which didn't happen, because you already
agree that it shouldn't have happened.

At this point, it should be over, save for the crying to your penpals
on the Internet. Indeed, it is over. Whatever follows is a separate incident.
You might be feeling righteous, and have an overpowering need to assert
your position in the world. You've then become the aggressor, complete
with malicious intent.

Independently, he might rebound and swing too far the other way: "I'm
not an asshole. I'll show him!" At which point, it becomes something
other than a simple case of risky driving error. It becomes full-blown,
dangerous aggression.

I don't believe I'm speaking from ignorance, and certainly not with naivety.
I am very aware that people play silly games on the road. And I'm very
aware that there are precisely four kinds of people on the road: there's
you, the careless assholes, the out-and-out assholes, and the background
noise.

We all believe, probably without exception that we are careful, skilled,
right-thinking, and attentive drivers. Courteous might or might not be
part of it, but that's a different subject. No amount of words will change
that for any of us.

But I'll say it again anyway: in most of these "close calls", nothing
happened; it was a non-incident; there was no malice, and therefore,
no slight; any slight you might construe is yours alone, and as such,
is not justification for any follow up action.

And what do you achieve by lecturing the driver on his driving failure?

A man wearing a uniform, nurse-maiding traffic, might delude himself
that he's doing something meaningful with his life. He might lecture
about safety as he hands back your license. Maybe he even goes home believing
he reached a few of the empty noggins he sees everyday.

If he does, he'll be one of the few. I don't know a single person who
acknowledges having learned anything useful from one of those roadside
lectures. You sit there and take it because you're one of the sheep caught
with your hand in the cookie jar, just like the little child that the
condescending slob likewise pretends that you are. Maybe you're OK with
that; maybe you're not.

On the other hand, see the confrontation between motorcyclist and car
driver from the car driver's perspective. The man you almost ran over
dismounts his bike at the red light and approaches you. Is he going to
talk or fight. You are immediately on the defensive. What does he have
to say that you don't already know?

"Howdy, stranger. You almost killed me back there." No ****, Sherlock!
Nope, he's not there for that at all. What kind of conversation do you
think you can have? Do you have some insights about mirrors and shoulder
checks that he doesn't already know?

Again, maybe you're OK with the condescending bull that's likely to spew
forth. But more likely, you're not, and without the presence of the badge
and the official capacity it represents, you will feel more free to express
your discontent with the rider's self righteousness.

Case closed? Not by far. No matter how loud you yell, they're not listening.
It's wasted breath if your intent truly was to educate; any lesson to
be learned had already been delivered. If you were expecting an apology,
and didn't get so much as an embarrassed wave before, what do you think
your presence at his door is going to accomplish?

Are you perhaps thinking to beat an apology out of him? As soon as you
do this, the matter becomes a criminal offence and you are the criminal.
No amount of explaining how the dude's bad driving placed your life in
danger is going to sway the judge one whit. The resulting criminal record
will dog your life when looking for employment or in other important
ways for years to come.

If you learn to control yourself and, after that second or two of annoyance
with the incompetence and thoughtlessness of those bad drivers, shrug
off the incident as just part of the learning curve, you'll no doubt
live a long and happy life on the road.

And that, surely, is what motorcycling is all about.
 

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Looks like some real good replys on this subject.
I can't add much more to the good responses, other than simply....vent your anger here, and leave the a-holes alone...their day will come.

It is unfortunate that this type of anger happens on the highways, byways of our nations roads, but it is a fact of life, an everyday occurrence; so ride on brothers and sisters, if you value your life you will thank yourself later for staying calm. There are too many roads to ride, places to visit, friends to make in our journey of life.


Jimmy T.
 

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HIPPO-

Very very well thought out and well-written too. I agree and have tried to think that way on the road for years. As far as the road-side lectures go, a smary guy once said...

"Consider how hard it is to change yourself and you will realize what little chance you have of changing others."

In a way I feel sorry for a guy that gets up in the morning and loads his pockets up with ball bearings before he rides off down the road. Almost like he wants trouble.
 

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The reason we flip people off or get in their face is not because we're trying to educate them. It's a simple matter of releasing our own anger. There is no constructive purpose to it; it just feels good to get our revenge.

If somebody pulls a stupid move that endangers me, you better believe they're going to know how I feel about it. But I wouldn't go as far as physical violence unless provoked.
 

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When I ride it's strictly for recreational purposes. I live in a semi small town with lots of two lane roads winding through farmland. I'm out to feel the wind in my face and have a good time. There is no way that I'm going to let some jerk ruin that for me.
 

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So many great replies. I would like to share something I learned that was very profound. I hate to sound dramatic but it has truly been one of those light bulbs in my riding career that it has made a difference. I hope it will make a difference with you or anyone else on this post.

Many years ago I took an MSF, ERC course from a guy who was also an ex motorcycle highway patrol. I wish I could think of his name to give him credit because this came from him and was not necessarily MSF. Anyway in addition to the skills he taught, he left me with something almost as important. Attitude. When someone cuts you off or does something really stupid in traffic, use your skills. By using your proper braking skills, swerving skills, braking and swerving, or swerving and braking skills; by being aware of your surroundings and planning your escape route, you avoid the accident.

Here is where the attitude part comes in. Smile and scream YES. You didn't get me this time asshole. Damn I'm good, alot of bikers couldn't have come through that! Look at it as a test and you passed! Feel good about yourself instead of anger at the other person. Go on and have a great ride.
 
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