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Discussion Starter #1
December is the dead of winter around here, about the time when my motor will back together and re-united with the rest of the bike

Engine set up as follows:

107" Axtell over-square with dished pistons 10:1
Deweys ProStreet Ported heads
Andrews 67G
SE CV44
V&H ProPipe HS
SE Adjustable ignition or S&S IST
Roller rockers, Andrews adjustable pushrods
Stock B-lifters
Zippers Timken conversion

I will do the heat cycle routine by the book and then would like to do the next phase of break in on a DynoJet 250i. What are the load parameters/timing etc to perform an optimum break in?

Any advice is very much appreciated.

Thanks from Vienna
 

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IronButt
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It is very basic, start with a dyno that had a eddie current brake apply 10-15% load,

Start in 3rd gear load the engine with a easy roll on to 2500 with a starting point of 1500, let the engine spool down then go to 3000, now use 4th gr and start at 1500 rpm again and go to 3500. By this time the engine may be getting hot use a digital temp gauge and make sure you are under 200, if not let cool. Once cool start again increasing by 500 rpm until you get to 5000.
You are done.

The rings are seated that easy, rings seat for the most part in the first 10-15 miles. If dyno not aviable I go out and do roll on's with 50% throttle rolls in 2, 3 and 4th gear and the pressure is what is seating rings. I also but 50 miles on the bike on a build to ensure that all is fine in the world.
 

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Thanks for the info HDWRENCH About how long does this take for a break-in I have noticed alot more dyno services offering break-in but never noticed anyone quoting how much dyno time is required or a price for the service...
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thx HDWRENCH

Thanks for the info, seems easy enough to do on a lazy Saturday afternoon with 3' of snow on the ground..........

I assume once the rings are seated, I'll go for it, right?
 

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I will receive my heads and cylinders back from Dan Baisley on Monday ( can't wait). Dan was great to deal with. I spent a lot of time on the phone with him talking about my particulars. He didn't have that your wasting my time attitude that you get from a lot of places! Dan actually sounded excited about my build even though he has probably done hundreds of these! I asked him about his recommendations for break in. He suggested the following; http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
Dan said that this may cause some controversy but he is sold on this method!
 

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pa-glazier said:
I will receive my heads and cylinders back from Dan Baisley on Monday ( can't wait). Dan was great to deal with. I spent a lot of time on the phone with him talking about my particulars. He didn't have that your wasting my time attitude that you get from a lot of places! Dan actually sounded excited about my build even though he has probably done hundreds of these! I asked him about his recommendations for break in. He suggested the following; http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
Dan said that this may cause some controversy but he is sold on this method!
Wow! Well, If it's good enough for Baisley, I guess it's good enough for me!
Anyone else wanna weigh in on this break in method?
 

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I heat cycle all my motors PRIOR to breakin of any sort. I run the bike for 30 sec and let it go stone cold. Then 1 minute and cold. Add 30 seconds and repeat cycle until you have reached 5 min. Then begin your break in procedures on the dyno WHILE monitoring fuel for anything unsafe. I regularly build everything from stock motors to Fatso's, 124's and everything in between and do this on every one of them.

Hope this helps.
 

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Break-In Procedures

At the shop that I work at we do alot of engine break-in's. Our procedure consists of starting engine on the dyno and setting the ignition timing and then allow the engine to warm up to 100 deg oil temperature. Cool completely and then start and warm up again. This time we run the engine without any load until the engine oil temp reaches 125 deg. Cool completely and then start and warm engine until oil temp reaches 150 deg., again without any load. Cool completely and then start the engine and warm until oil temp reaches 175 deg., again without any load. During each of thesae procedures we monitor Exhaust Gas Temps in both cylinders, Vacuum, Oil Temp, Oil Pressure, Oil Return, Air Fuel Ratio and Crankcase Pressure.

After this procedure has been completed we then start engine and apply a load of 10-12 ft. lbs. torque alternating rpm's from 1,500-2,500 rpm's. We allow the engine to achieve an oil temp of 150 deg. We then cool engine and then start the procedure again. We continue this procedure until the engine can maintain a consistant oil temp of 175 deg. for a period of 30 min. (The amount of time and sequences depends on the engine clearances and size of the engine, etc. the bigger the CI the more friction is produced and this leads to increased oil temps.).

After this is completed we then increase the load on the engine and then use a break-in program in the computor that will cycle the engine from 2,200-2,800 rpm with out increasing the torque over 22 ft. lbs. As for how long it take to break-in an engine is not the same on any two engines. We monitor the EGT and Crankcase Pressure closely. This is what determines if the engine is breaking in properly. If the crankcase pressure is not consistantly at -1.5 to -2.0 then the rings have not seal properly and completely.

REMEMBER - - BREAKING IN AND ENGINE IS THE FINAL MACHINING PROCEDURE OF BUILDING AN ENGINE.

If this is not done properly then you are not achieving all of the performance that you purchased. Ring seal is the most critical part of engine break-in. Don't be misled by improper break-in procedures!

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