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The Viking
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89 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Can anybody advise me as to how hard it is to carry out a 95 upgrade.
Was thinking of doing this my self but feedback and sharp intake of breaths I get when I mention it is that I should let the pro's do it. :dunno:

So the question is do I do it myself or should I pay the extra and get it done for me.

If I do it myself what special tools do I need?

was thinking of going S&S pots and Pistons with S&S 510G cam


Any advice would be appreciated.:)


Mickyo
 

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Nice to ride again :-)
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1,802 Posts
Well can, and have you turned a wrench? Are you mechanically inclined? Do you have the FM and Parts Books for your year model? Fist 100 you should spend on the bike is for those.

Do searches here, look at the builds in those searches, decide on your driving style, read the FM and Parts book and decide.

I did my Sportster (Evo) on my own in my dinning room, single you know:thanks:

I got lucky and had a mentor on the Road Glide(BT):clap:

I know the bike. I am in and out of rocker boxes in very little time, compensator nut and primary are not too much of a mystery to me since it blessed me at 4200 miles.:( Cam chest is cool now that I been there, oil pump still amazes me though.

I am not a mechanic, but I can turn a wrench, and read, and ask for help, and stop when I should, which was, and is the hardest thing to do for me.

But if you have a decent place to work, a matched and well thought out parts list, and the time, go for it!

I guess long and short of it, you have to decide if you got it in you with a shop manual and a wrench? After that you got a ton of work and reading to do, but man it is nice to know your own bike, and man that first start after your own build is very cool {salute(
 

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Premium Member
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210 Posts
LAF said:
Well can, and have you turned a wrench? Are you mechanically inclined? Do you have the FM and Parts Books for your year model? I know the bike. I am in and out of rocker boxes in very little time, compensator nut and primary are not too much of a mystery to me since it blessed me at 4200 miles. I can turn a wrench, and read, and ask for help, and stop when I should, which was, and is the hardest thing to do for me.

But if you have a decent place to work, a matched and well thought out parts list, and the time, go for it!

I guess long and short of it, you have to decide if you got it in you with a shop manual and a wrench? After that you got a ton of work and reading to do, but man it is nice to know your own bike, and man that first start after your own build is very cool {salute(
I agree. I built a 355 (.030 over 350) about 20 years ago. I spent about a year, asking questions, gathering parts and studying. After I'd snugged the last bolt, I sat and looked at it for about an hour, running all the things I should have done through my mind. I couldn't think of anything left undone.

I turned the key. It fired and ran GREAT the first try. There is no finer feeling in the world. Go for it and Good Luck! :thumbsup:
 

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"Jane you ignorant slut!"
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2,292 Posts
Great topic, as I disassembled my 06 Heritage today for the same work.

1st time in a Harley. It has the heads off at this point and will pull the cylinders and cams when the parts arrive. Thought I'd get the heads done while waiting for the parts.

Just read the manual. The only tough part so far was getting the throttle body side intake manifold bolts out, but not too bad. I'm keeping track of the time and it's 3 hours so far. I think the second time, using air tools I could easily cut an hour off that.

Good luck,

Chris

Unhooking the fuel tank cross over and not getting everything covered with gas is fun too.
 

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Really is sooooooo true about the feeling you get when you first fire up the bike and she barks and then settles...................you just never forget!!

Many on here will help you...............and like driving a car.............you will sit back and say..........too easy!

All the best, Ozzie
 

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I just finished my 95" build a couple of weeks ago.(its amazing the power difference and the bike is running on a canned map, not dyno tuned yet) It was a little intimidating making the decision to do it myself. Now that it is done I am so glad I found the balls to do it!:Banadance Like Ozzie said there is nothing like hitting the starter and having the bike come to life after your surgery! The twin cam is not a complicated engine! If you decided to go it your self I will be glad to help in any way that I can! I wish that you lived closer so that I could lend a hand and lend you some of the special tools that I picked up,
 

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The Viking
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89 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all you guys for your inputs, it certainly has helped me and given me the inspiration to do this upgrade myself.:thumbsup:

forgot to mention my ride, she is a 2003 silver/black wide glide with a few more shiney bits on than when I first bought her (in florida last year and did the west coast this year. Chrome is so cheap in the states compared to the UK. My wife could hardly manage the cases on the way home :D) anyway stage 1 done when I got her with se slash cuts, and she runs great but I want more ummmmph if you know what I mean.

Trying to keep costs down and looking on the site think I may go for se flat top pistons....then have the original pots rebored( seems to be better this way as opposed to buying off the shelf pots...already have a 44mm se big bore carb...a 6200 rpm ignition mod.....can't decide on the cam though, should I go andrews 37g or s&s 510g then finally all the bits and bobs like gasket kits, specialist tools.

LAF..... if I did my mod in the dining room, think I'd be single :D :D :D



LAF
pa-glazier
ozzie
cerrrra42
wizwill
SEDELUXE05

once again thanks but,








I'll be back :yes:
 

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do it yourself

I did mine in July,the big issue with you will be changing out the cam bearings,rent the tools,have a shop book for your bike,and with a little help from buddies you can do it,search this forum for the guy who rents tools through the mail,and another guy has the oil pump alightment pins good luck.
 

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IronButt
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6,364 Posts
I still get excited when I fire up a build for the first time the best is when you have the customer there and let him /here do it. I hope it starts,... I hope it starts... LOL just kidding
 

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"Jane you ignorant slut!"
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2,292 Posts
I'll keep you posted when I disassemble the cams. I'm also keeping a time and cost log.

My plan for the cams are; the dealer has free pickup and delivery. I take the cam support out, have them come and get the bike, press the cams in the support and change out the inner cam bearing in the engine, bring the bike back. They said it would cost an hour. Then I don't have to buy or rent the tools and I don't want to press the cams anyway. I figured if I had a problem doing this job myself that would be where, so about $75 is peace of mind.

Chris
 

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Doing it yourself will give you a major boner! Just make sure you have the tools and the service manual.
 

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How Hard

The issue with the cam bearings is no longer an issue (GOOD PLAN). The only other thing will be the with the pistons.The book shows putting the pistons on the rods first and then using a small ring compressor,and sliding the cylinders onto the pistons. I put the pistons in first using a normal automotive ring compressor,pulled the piston down out of the jug just enough to keep the rings in place ,and with the help of the old lady lowered jug, down onto rod,and inserted piston pin,then installed snap rings.It worked for me I didn't want to buy a small ring compressor,and you can do it on the work bench. Go for it.
 
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