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Discussion Starter #1
07 Ultra
105”
Andrews 37
CNC street port heads by Automotive Machine in Ft. Worth, TX
Supertrapp 2:1
Baker 7-speed
Sprockets changed front and rear
ThunderMax Wave Tune

I recently added the ThunderMax to the bike. I was using another tuner before, that was truly real-time that worked perfectly. But it was a piggyback unit and I was never able to successfully raise the RPM limit beyond the stock 5800 RPM in the stock ECM with the piggyback unit.

The ThunderMax is working well, and I think it will eventually get the tune as good as the previous unit. Customer support has been quite good. However, the one thing I cannot seem to get from them is a clear description of how the unit actually “does what it does”. How does this system basically change the map?

The main question I have no answer for is: After you have ridden the bike for a “session”, what does the system DO (if anything) when you simply switch the key off? And how does that differ from performing Auto Map after the session?

If it writes to a buffer while you are riding (“learned offsets”?), then updates the map with the contents of the buffer when you switch off the key, why is Auto Map ever required?

I'm not expecting to learn anything to make the tune better. I would just like to understand how it works. In spite of some really great customer support from Zipper's, I can't seem to get a straight answer for this question.
 

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As I understand it, wave tune just has the capability to take bigger swings at the fuel correction.

http://www.thunder-max.com/newsandevents/wavetune.aspx

And I doubt they will ever tell you just exactly haw it does it.

But with the wave tune you get to optimal air fuel faster than with the old set up. And you prolly get to skip the auto write required because the adjusted map was on the preset adjustment limits.

The auto tune only adjusts air fuel mix. Spark and idle presets are a function of the map. When you get done with your run, you should go in and run the auto map tool. So the scooter starts out with the acquired fuel mapping as the starting points to work off of. I keep a pigtail on mine just so I can do it in quicker. Be sure to save the map first, in case you want to reload it later. I save both before and after. More than once I have sen a map go buggy, or get corrupted in use.

Print the manual out, do have lots of paper and full ink bottles. Then spend a weekend reading it. After you read it, go back and bone up on the interface, learn how to drive the software. Then move on to working with the tune.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Thermodyne. I thought I had read everything they had online. I'll check again.
Does almost everyone encounter the same tuning problem when using wide-band sensors--that the tuner never seems to be able to quite "get it right" at very low throttle openings?

All three of the SERT bikes I tuned had that problem. I eventually had to go in and write cells much richer than indicated, to keep the engine from lightly "gurgling" at very small throttle openings? It's not a misfire...it's more like something that WANTS to misfire, but isn't quite that far off. Someone once suggested retarding timing at those throttle openings, but I never tried that.

Thanks!
 

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No idea as to what you are referring to.

The map has a target fuel mix and the Tmax uses the 02 sensor to achieve it.

SERT and Thundermax are two different methods for delivering fuel.

If you want to bone up on the technical side of the Tmax, read about Alpa-N injection systems.
 
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