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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here's the story ....

Every Thanksgiving my grandmother used to make this stuff that all the kids hated, me included. My mom used to make us eat it because it took so long to make. The stuff was always called Hot Slaw. Well my grandmother is no longer with us and the Hot Slaw somehow became part of the Thanksgiving tradition for our family. I now make the stuff. It is an acquired taste. You either love it or hate it. If you hate it and are forced to eat it for years, you eventually don't mind it and even might say it was good, this is me now.

My Grandmothers recipe took a day and half to make. You chopped 2 heads of cabbage in to tiny pieces with a large knife. This took hours to cut up and it was never fine enough. You then combine all the ingredients into a large pot and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat and cook on low for 24 hours (not a typo!!! 24 hours !!!). When you are done, you have this dark stuff on the bottom of the pot. This is the finished Hot Slow. Scrape it out and serve.

The above recipe is still the same but I have refined the process.

2 heads of Cabbage finely chopped in a food processor
2 cups of sugar
1 16oz bottle of distilled white vinegar

Combine all ingredient in a large pot or pressure cooker. I use a pressure cooker to reduce cooking time to hours rather than days. Mix ingredient in pot. If using a pressure cooker, use 10 psi setting and bring to boil. Reduce heat once top starts rattling. Set heat so that top rattles every 5-10 seconds for about 5-10 seconds. Cook for 2 hours, reduce pressure, open and stir, then replace top and pressure cook for an additional hour. Total pressure cooking time of 3 hours. If liquid present, let simmer to evaporate liquid stirring occasionally.

If cooking in a pot, bring to boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook on low until bed time. Turn off until morning and repete. Cook until dark brown stuff is left in bottom of pot.

It is hard to describe so I have some pictures. When it is done, I will post finished pics too.

Cabbage cut into 1 inch square sections to fit food processor



Chopped Cabbage



Mixed ingredients ready to cook
 

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springer- said:
When you are done, you have this dark stuff on the bottom of the pot. This is the finished Hot Slow. Scrape it out and serve.
Wow, that sounds ... good. :puke:

Seriously, though, I'm interested in seeing the final product. I may try making this myself. It sounds just odd enough to be good.
 

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No wonder you took an interest in motorcycle mechanics. You had to wear welding goggles at the Thanksgiving table just so you couldn't see that stuff.

Seriously, what is the ethnic or regional origin of that dish?
 

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Goin' Fast with Class
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Make ya fart? :fart:
 

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EASY DOES IT
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Damn man...that's child abuse...almost as bad as fruit cake, if I end up with a few more this year I'm gonna build a garage!
 

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Just Like to Ride
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I'm sorry for your years of abuse as a child. But cabbage being cooked is not cole slaw, it is cooked cabbage. Cole slaw is cold.
 

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24 hours?, what kind of pressure cooker, some ones stomach?, looks like that stuff has been eaten and digested once already but with that much sugar it should be edible.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
No idea of the origin or back ground but it was at least made in Lynn, Mass.

It is server as a side dish, Approximately 1 serving spoon full is a serving. It is served hot or cold. And it goes well on a turkey and stuffing sandwich, just turkey stuffing and slaw (cold), on bread.

Now we force the kids to eat it :roflback:

I think cabbage makes you fart because of digesting it, this wouldn't realy apply as it goes in pre-digested. :roflback:
 

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carmelized cabbage with acetic acid..... it almost sounds like something that originally happened by accident and somehow survived to be replicated year after year.

It's something I would try and see how it tastes first before proceeding.
 

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Springer, wtf!!

Now we force the kids to eat it
%[email protected]

I've never heard of this delicacy, but place it right there with my favorite,
eggs and brains. Actually, I used to like eggs and brains as a child. We got
it everyyear between Thanksgiving and Christmas, whenever the weather got cold enough to kill hogs. This was also the time we got chittlins, biscuits with
cracklins, and all the other renamed pork entrals. (vicera, I think is what we
now call this stuff) We ate everything but the blood and the oink.

Back to your family dish. Is it anything like yellow squash cooked until
the same consistency? I'll forward the above recipie to my wife to see
if she will try a pot for us. I like cabbage.

But, please, please, don't make the kids eat it. (they might turn out like me)

:hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria:

Happy Thanksgiving!!
 

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RidingJerry said:
Springer, wtf!!



%[email protected]

I've never heard of this delicacy, but place it right there with my favorite,
eggs and brains. Actually, I used to like eggs and brains as a child. We got
it everyyear between Thanksgiving and Christmas, whenever the weather got cold enough to kill hogs. This was also the time we got chittlins, biscuits with
cracklins, and all the other renamed pork entrals. (vicera, I think is what we
now call this stuff) We ate everything but the blood and the oink.

Back to your family dish. Is it anything like yellow squash cooked until
the same consistency? I'll forward the above recipie to my wife to see
if she will try a pot for us. I like cabbage.

But, please, please, don't make the kids eat it. (they might turn out like me)

:hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria: :hystria:

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Is Scrapple any good for ya? I eat the pee out of Scrapple. Fry it hard!
 

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I have a theory.

Here's how it goes:

Everybody went to grandma's house for Thanksgiving. Arriving the day before, so they could help out with preperations. Grandma thought this was a great idea, until everyone arrived. She then suddenly realized how wonderful it was that every one of her children moved out of said house and now lived quite a few hours away.

Hmmm, quite a few hours away? Gram suddenly realizes they're gonna be spending more than one night. So, naturally Gram did what every red blodded American does when family arrives for an extended period of time: she started hittin the sauce. Somewhere between finishing making the pumpkin pie and starting to make the saurkraut for the special "after Thanksgiving treats" Gram announces that "she'll be back in a minute, don't worry bout the stuff on the stove".

Into the bedroom Gram goes where the juice kicks in fully and before she knows it she's passed out cross the bed.

Well, Gram wakes Thanksgiving morning to a putrid smell coming from the kitchen. Upon investigating she sees her stoopid kids left the 'kraut on the stove all night. "Dam kids. Can't count on them to do a dam thing around here. I'll show 'em. I'll make 'em eat this burnt crap. Hopefully that'll run 'em off for good."

Well, poor 'ol Gram. We'll have fond memories of her great Thanksgivings. And in memory of her dying of carbon monoxide poisoning those many Thanksgivings ago, we carry on the tradition of making her "special" cabbage dish.

The End.

^^^ that's where the cabbage dish really kicks in


HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!

-darrell
 

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Springer, I think what ya got there is a German dish called Rotkohl, or red cabbage (pronounced roat-coal) - Google it. The Germans use red cabbage and they add some other stuff but it's basically the same thing. It's tasty, too. They cook it 2 to 3 hours minimum but they say longer is better, next day is best. The German recipe uses lard, onion, cloves, apples and bay leaves but it's basically sweet and sour cabbage.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
thedog said:
Springer, I think what ya got there is a German dish called Rotkohl, or red cabbage (pronounced roat-coal) - Google it. The Germans use red cabbage and they add some other stuff but it's basically the same thing. It's tasty, too. They cook it 2 to 3 hours minimum but they say longer is better, next day is best. The German recipe uses lard, onion, cloves, apples and bay leaves but it's basically sweet and sour cabbage.
Sounds like the same exact stuff only completely different :roflback:
 
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