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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hippo,
I'm trying to order a 'Bango bolt' with a built in brake light switch for my front master cylinder.
The place where I'm ordering from wants to know what size?
1mm or 1.25mm?
As far as I know Harley's screws and bolts etc are a mix match of imperial etc and Metric now.
Do you know what size my front master cylinder bango bolt is? Is it metric even? :(
They're all the same size I think, but what?
 

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I believe they are metric like most other stuff on the forks and calipers, but not sure about the pitch. Would have to take one off and measure it, if I had to guess I would say 1.25 mm, but not sure.

Why change from the factory switch, the banjo bolts with the wires sticking out of them are butt ugly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
HIPPO said:
I would say 1.25 mm, but not sure.

Why change from the factory switch, the banjo bolts with the wires sticking out of them are butt ugly?
The OEM one works/don't work, I think its burnt out somehow. Thought the bango bolt option might be easier to replace 'If' and when it needs it.

Anywhere on the net to get a 'better' replacement for the OEM?
Seached over here and can't find any, most sites are in the US :rolleyes:

Thanks for the info. :)
 

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I think it is much easier to replace the stock switch, they just snap into the housing. For the most part they just fail when people work on the right grip controls witout depressing the lever during disassembly.

Sometimes they just need to be repositioned or spaced.

Changing banjo switches requires brake bleeding, and this can be a pain on a Harley if you don't have a reverse injector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
HIPPO said:

Changing banjo switches requires brake bleeding, and this can be a pain on a Harley if you don't have a reverse injector.
Thanks Hippo.
I'm gonna flush and replace the brake fluid anyway. This might sound strange, but Instead of using an expensive 'reverse injecter' I use one of those squirty oil cans (new) that you press with your thumb, with a piece of tubing attached to the end of the spout, attach this to the brake nipple, one at a time, have a bungi cord holding the brake lever depressed and inject fluid 'UP' from the caliper. Works a treat, All you need to do then is bleed in the normal way.
Anyway, my switch is fu(ked, I think I'll replace it with a Harley one after all. Hope it lasts longer this time :rolleyes:
 

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That works, we have been doing it for decades, but it's sort of messy.
If you do it right there shouldn't be need for bleeding.


These days you can buy a reverse injector for less the 100 bucks, and be done in 5 minutes. Not top of the line, but made by the same company and good enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Does it not open the return port by derpressing lever?
Did this once before. Worked ok. (oops, did it wrong way?)
 
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