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I would think this is probably a re-occuring question, but I am stumped! I just put a FXD (Super Glide) on order. After looking at the upgrades that I would want (Spoked wheels, Bobcat fender, forward controls). I was just wondering if it would be a better idea to get the softail standard (non-fuel injected) at $1350.00 more or just upgrade in time on the FXD? I know the answer seems self-explanitory but that $1350.00 is a big jump for me. Is there any other differences in the bike that would make it a "no-brainer" or should I just go with the FXD and do the upgrading later?

It does seem like a never-ending process. I started with the 1200 Sporty them decided to get the FXD. Now I am undecided between the FXD and the FXST. Please help me stop the madness!!!!
 

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Hey Louc, I went back and forth many times on the same issue. Let's be honest, the Softtail looks better than the Superglide (though the Wideglide beats them both IMO). That raked front end, bobtail, and dash tank make me thick. But the Superglide is a great looking bike too. I eventually went with what I thought would be the best bike for me from a functional point of view. I got the Superglide for the following reasons:

1. The smaller rake angle makes it a little more maneuverable, probably easier to navigate for a rookie like me. Most importantly, I can roll it from the family room to the living room without a zillion K-turns.

2. I plan to do some occasional long hauls so the vibration mounted engine is a plus. Haven't sat on an 88-B yet so I can't compare the difference. Seems like a lot of effort and expense to keep the engine hard mounted, though it does look cleaner.

3. What's wrong with shocks on the outside of the frame? Sort of like a toupee. Nobody is fooled into thinking a Softail is an old fashioned hardtail so I won't be awarded any machismo iron-butt bonus points.

The one downside is that there aren't nearly as many aftermarket accessories for the Dyna family, but I like it plane Jane anyhow so I don't mind. I've not seen any lack of substantial Dyna accessories, just fewer skull-encrusted trinkets etc.

But if I'd have went with the Softtail I'm sure I'd have an equally compelling list of reasons why it's the best thing since sliced bread. Follow your heart. And certainly talk to guys in the know. My point of view is just a rooky's personal observation and line of reasoning.

Chilly
 

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It sounds to me like it comes down more to which family you would prefer, Dyna or Softail. I don't claim to be an expert, but some things I have noticed as differences between the two families are:

Dynas have a little vibration that rattles the mirrors and goes away at about 2000 RPM or so, kind of like an old muscle car for lack of a better way to describe it. Softails are smooth all the time. In fact, when I was looking the salesman put a glass of water on the seat while a softail was idling and it didn't even ripple.

Dynas seem to have better handling characteristics than softails. They seem to be, generally speaking, more nimble.

Softails have larger, recessed seats. On a Dyna you are sitting ON the bike. With a Softail you are sitting IN the bike. Dyna seats fit people better who have narrow hips, Softails those who do not.

As previously mentioned, there are more trinkets and bobbles available for the Softail family than the Dyna family. This may or may not matter to you as how important it is really comes down to what you want to change about the stock look.

As for how each of them ride it may be worth renting one of each of the two models you are considering and see which suits you better. I have heard just as many people say they prefer the way the Dyna "feels" going down the road as have said Softail are the way to go so it really seems to be a personal choice there.

Final observation: Dynas and the toruing family both use the vibration isolated engine. The softail family alone uses the 88-B, counter-balanced cam enging.

Hope that helps!
 

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If you ever want more HP its easer to do the mod on a Dyna. One never see's TC softails (with stock stroke) running the 1/4 in 10 sec. Fact is the TC-B do have there share of vibes, and they get louder as the rmp's add up. True it is smooth compaired to thr pre-2000 models but it ant as smooth as the FLH's or the Dyna's at high rpm's.

Softails have more looks with alittle less function & viesa-verse for Dynas.
 

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Definitely the Dyna! :D Around here you don't see many folks putting miles on softails. They appear to be more of a bar hopper, not comfy on the long haul. The Dyna is more "ridable" or sportier, if you will. I rode mine 850 miles in one day and couldn't be happier with MY choice. I understand that the Dyna's are smoother when riding. (Don't let that shimmy shake at idle fool ya.) And the ST's will vibrate at higher speeds.
Ride 'em both and try to keep your sanity.........
 

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I was in the same position 2 weeks ago, I got the FXDX Dyna Superglide Sport. Handles better, customize it how you want and you'll have the best of both worlds.
 

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Test ride both of them and decide which one feels best to you.

If you like the looks of the Softail, the Wideglide will give you a similar style but it won't give you that phony Hardtail look like the Softails.

Dynas are for the purists or those looking at the performance side.
 

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Have an 02 FXST; love it and have it looking the way I want it. The way I look at is if you are split bewteen two bikes and you know deep down in your heart which one you want, you'll always wish you'd gotten that one.
 

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My 01 Dyna Lowrider was light, revved quick, and was fun to throw around in the corners. It shook a little a idle, but was butter smooth at any speed on the highway. The pegs were directly below me for easy standing going over severe railroad tracks, but my knees were a bit cramped on very long rides. I could have added hiway pegs but didn't really need them. All in all, a very fun bike.

My 02 Heritage Softail is heavy, revs a little slower due to the balance shafts, and has to be muscled around quick corners. It is very smooth at idle, but there is a slight buzz on the hiway at speed. The floorboards are placed perfectly for long rides. The hidden suspension does a decent job even with two-up. And the MOST important reason I got this bike is to make my Honey happy.
The Heritage is roomy and comfortable for two on long rides, but we found the Dyna to be a little cramped for two on 1000 mile weekends.

Good luck with your choice. You are doing the right thing by taking your time to ask a lot of questions first, it's a lot of money to spend either way.
 

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A couple of points- theFXDL LowRider has highway pegs standard and the Dynas and FLH models are totally different. The Dynas have a two point mounting system; the FLH has three which controls the vibration better. The FLH is still the same basic frame that came out in 1980 and was used for the FXR models as well.
But to the question at hand, I think the Dynas and Softails are basically equal but different. I happen to prefer the rear fender on the Dyna that hugs the tire rather than the ducktail on the Softail, but I like the way the seat is scooped down from the gas tank on the Softails to the high and thinly padded Dyna seat. I think both control vibration satisfactorily.
 

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Louc,

I think the Habanero Kid hit it on the head. The soft tail has looks for around town bar hopping. The super glide is functional.

I like to throw my bike into corners, carve them up, and power out. My superglide lets me do that. I test rode a dyna low rider and it didn't want to dive into a turn as I like.

Think heavy metal. I want those two shocks on the sides of the rear wheel. I will change the stocks to the fully enclosed chrome metal shocks I found online. I prefer the looks of externally mounted side shocks on the rear.

It all boils down to preference. With time and money though, a Harley can be altered to whatever you want. Later, you can even get a custom frame and end up with a completely different bike at minimal cost.

You decide for yourself.
 

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I had this same question in my mind this past winter. I LIKED the looks of the FXST, but my problem was the forward controls. My feet just wouldn't position far enough forward to reach them comfortably. Try and ride or at least sit on both styles of bike before you buy. I ended up buying a used '99 FXDX and I'm pretty happy with it (other than the frigging cam bearing problem..but I've beat that dead horse to death).
If I were to buy another Harley (you can NEVER have enough Harleys)
it would be a low rider with an Evo motor. If I were to BUILD a bike, it would be a Panhead hardtail. Right DrScum? ;)

Dep
 

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Somebody pulled this thread up outta the graveyard! I don't know if Louc bought a bike yet, but she hasn't responded to this thread since it's unearthing.

I for one appreciate the good conversation since I'm still lookin at buying my bike-as are many others out there-but Louc's question has probably been answered!!! :)

BTW-I do the exact same thing she did in her first thread...My fiance and a wise old biker both gave me some great advice-Get what you really want. Spend the money once and don't look back. It's more expensive to buy another bike than to just do it right the first time!!!

I was up in the air between ther DWG and the Train for the longest time. The Train just grew on me tho-screw which one is more comfy or handles better!:D
 
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