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How is it best to handle a front tire blowout? I've had the rear go out 2x and it was no big deal, but I was traveling around 35mph both times. I've heard a front tire blowout is much harder to control. I would assume you apply the rear brakes, but are there any other tips? What if your traveling at around 55/65, will the bike be tough to control?
 

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Good question Jim. Two different situations to this, one is if you have a tube and the other is with a tubeless tire.

It's rare to have a blow out with a tubeless tire, usually it goes down slowly. you will notice the front get "heavy" and the handling goes away. You should notice the change in response. Stay off the front brake and gently pull off the road.

If you have a true blow out, as in rapid and complete loss of air, you do as you said. Be very gentle with steering input, do not use the front brake at all. Keep in mind rolling off the throttle too fast will transfer weight to the front tire just as braking will so be careful slowing down too. As above pull off the road. The first thing you do after you stop is change your shorts.

As for your question on will it be hard to controll at highway speeds, absolutely. But it's not impossible.
 

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I've had this happen... not on a HD, but on an old Honda CB550, in the worst possible conditions: Light mist of rain, rush hour traffic, at highway speeds.

I heard what sounded like a gunshot, then it started "tank slapping." Fortunately the cagers were paying attention and backed off. I eased off the throttle, then pulled the clutch and let it coast to a stop, nursing it over to the shoulder. It could have been VERY bad. I was very lucky.

Front tire blowouts leave you with almost no directional control. They're bad. If you have one, don't do ANYTHING abrupt, and don't panic. Ease off the throttle, or pull in the clutch... and ride it out, GENTLY. Don't try to force it to get over "right now." Get it slowed down while concentrating on remaining upright... then start to exert more control once you are moving slowly.

Brad
 

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About a month ago, I had the front tire go down within about the span of a mile, and finally lost all air as I was coming over a bridge on the way to work.

He's right when he said not to use the front brake. I slowed the bike by downshifting and using the rear brake. When I turned off, I checked the tire. The valve stem core was the culprit.

Since it was too early to get it fixed, I turned on the flashers and nursed the bike about a mile at around 5-10 mph until I got to work.

The front end gets real sluggish and very hard to control and steer.

-2$en#e-
 

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I had my front blow out doing 130km. It was wobble city and I managed to slide into the ditch at a reasonable speed. I feel I am lucky to be alive
 
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