V-Twin Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be installing an Andrews EV-27 cam in my 98 springer softail and I have Andrews adjustable pushrods. This is the first time I've ever done this and I'ld like to know if there is anything I need to be aware of or any tricks, tips, etc., that is not covered on the Nightrider.com web site. Thanks.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
871 Posts
stanc said:
I'm going to be installing an Andrews EV-27 cam in my 98 springer softail and I have Andrews adjustable pushrods. This is the first time I've ever done this and I'ld like to know if there is anything I need to be aware of or any tricks, tips, etc., that is not covered on the Nightrider.com web site. Thanks.
Just follow your factory manual, along with the instructions from Andrews. Nightrider.com has some good info, but you really should use the manufacturer's instructions and HD service manual when working on your bike. Use Nightrider as an additional reference. Don't use a Clymer, Haynes, or other cheap manual, either. They have a lot of incorrect and missing info.

Tips:

Money saving hint: Try to get your parts from an independent shop or online. The dealerships will usually rip you off, trying to sell you overpriced imported crap with the HD logo on it. I've saved a small fortune over the years by staying away from the stealerships unless I absolutely have no other option! Sometimes gaskets, nuts and bolts are cheaper at the stealer, though. Shop around first.

Change the inner cam bearing to a Torrington bearing (about $6 if you order online or go to an indy shop). You must do this when changing the cam, or you might be back in there again very soon.

Make sure the marks on the cam gear, breather gear, and pinion gear all line up! THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT! It wouldn't hurt to change to a steel breather gear either, if you can afford it. They don't cost a lot, though. If not, carefully inspect the stock plastic gear.

Change your pushrod tube gaskets now, to reduce the chance of a leak.

Check the screen in the oil pump for blockage.

While your lifters are out, make sure they are clean and the small plunger (piston) inside them is moving up and down without binding. You can push it down with a pushrod. There is very light spring pressure pushing it up. Check the bearings on the rollers to make sure they aren't damaged. In fact, if they are the original lifters, it would be a good idea to replace them. They aren't very expensive. Just get stock-type lifters for your year. They will handle just about anything you can throw at them... no need to waste money on expensive aftermarket lifters unless you are building a big inch, high compression monster.

One thing to remember about adjusting them is that the lifter's "piston" has a range of travel of .200 inch. What you are trying to do is to adjust (lengthen) the pushrod to compress the little spring to the middle of it's travel, or about .100 inch. How many turns this takes depends on the threads per inch of the pushrod adjustment. The instruction should tell you exactly how many turns that is. Mark it with a Sharpie to help keep count, or you can multiply the number of turns by 6 and count the flats of the adjustment nut (hex shaped). i.e. 4 turns = 24 flats. A flat or two either way won't make a difference.

Do you have the EZ install pushrods? Make sure that you follow the instructions to the letter. Nightrider has some info on adjusting them too, but follow Andrews' instructions first. They made em, they know how to install em. Make sure you adjust one at a time, and wait until you can spin it freely between your fingers BEFORE turning the engine to adjust the next rod. This could take as long as 20 minutes, but it's usually about 5-10. If you don't do this correctly, you could bend a valve. Adjust them while the lifter is at it's lowest position (on it's "base circle". To do this, lift the rear tire off the ground and shift into 5th gear. Also remove the spark plugs. Then you can easily turn the rear tire, pushing down on the lifter to determine when it's at it's lowest spot.

Then you lengthen the rod until it's just starting to make contact with the lifter. VERY LIGHT contact, so you aren't pushing the lifter's piston down, but so there's no up and down play and you can turn it with your fingers. Make sure the pushrod is seated in both the rocker arm and lifter pockets. After that, lengthen it the amount of turns mentioned in the instructions. Tighten the locknut, holding the adjustment nut so it doesn't move. Wait until you can turn the pushrod easily again, then move on to the next one.

When you are done, make sure you turn the engine over with the rear tire BEFORE hitting the start button!

Another tidbit of information.... the EV27 cam is a NOISY cam! Expect it to make some ticking noise at the front exhaust area. This is due to the design of the cam and is perfectly acceptable... meaning it will not hurt a thing. Mine sounds like an industrial sewing machine on steroids, especially since I have a windshield, but it still runs great so I leave it as it is. On some days the ticking comes and goes. Nothing to worry about.

The only way to reduce the noise is to either press the stock cam gear onto the new cam, or use a different size pinion gear to reduce the gear lash. You can also check to see if the pushrod is hitting the inside of the pushrod cover. If a little ticking doesn't bother you, then don't mess with it. You can usually tell if it's hitting the cover by putting your finger on it when it's running. Sometimes you can grind away a small amount of metal to keep it from hitting.

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. Have fun and FOLLOW ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY that came with the parts and the FACTORY service manual!!!!!!! :clap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
stanc said:
I'm going to be installing an Andrews EV-27 cam in my 98 springer softail and I have Andrews adjustable pushrods. This is the first time I've ever done this and I'ld like to know if there is anything I need to be aware of or any tricks, tips, etc., that is not covered on the Nightrider.com web site. Thanks.
Also if yoy don't have access to a machine press, try baking the cam plate in your oven (to expand steel) and freeze the cams (to contract steel) I did this and evrything slid into place quite easily. Do it while they are fresh from each but take care in alignment of cams(dots mark the right placement)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
fatboy69 said:
Also if yoy don't have access to a machine press, try baking the cam plate in your oven (to expand steel) and freeze the cams (to contract steel) I did this and evrything slid into place quite easily. Do it while they are fresh from each but take care in alignment of cams(dots mark the right placement)
There is no cam plate in an EVO motor. It is in your best interest to replace the gear that comes on your new cam with the stock one on your old cam to avoid excess noise or even worse, damage......Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
why do harleys need the cam gear changed when swapping cams? my 70 bonnie has been mixed and changed many times during the 25 or so years i have owned it, no unusual noises, no blowups, no problems at all
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
871 Posts
bonnie john said:
why do harleys need the cam gear changed when swapping cams? my 70 bonnie has been mixed and changed many times during the 25 or so years i have owned it, no unusual noises, no blowups, no problems at all
John,
You don't really have to change the gears, but it will help keep the noise down. Loud engines bother some people (not me, after all, it's a Harley :) ). The Harley EVOs have tighter tolerences between the gears. Each bike may be slightly different, which is why Harley uses different sized pinion gears to find the "best fit" to reduce noise. If there is too much lash, it will make a ticking sound, and if there is too little, it will make a whining sound. I used to own a 1966 Bonneville and never had that problem with it either. I think it's because there was more allowable gear lash in the Triumph.

nauipro,
I think he meant the cam "gear", not plate. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
nauipro,
I think he meant the cam "gear", not plate. :)[/QUOTE]
Quite possible Todd, but the use of the plural "cams" a couple times in the post had me wondering. I agree that it is not necessary in most cases to replace the cam gear, but I have seen a couple of pinion gears wiped from the use of a too large cam gear. In my opinion the use of the correct size gear is part of doing a professional job. I don't see much reason to cut corners unnecessarily. Just because you can get away with something doesn't mean that you should.........Bill
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
871 Posts
nauipro said:
Quite possible Todd, but the use of the plural "cams" a couple times in the post had me wondering. I agree that it is not necessary in most cases to replace the cam gear, but I have seen a couple of pinion gears wiped from the use of a too large cam gear. In my opinion the use of the correct size gear is part of doing a professional job. I don't see much reason to cut corners unnecessarily. Just because you can get away with something doesn't mean that you should.........Bill
True. I think that the cam manufacturers assume that the buyer knows to check the lash and change the pinion gear to the proper size. I like to use a new pinion gear if the bike's owner wants it as quiet as possible. That way there are two new gears installed rather than using both old ones. A new pinion gear doesn't cost much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
ToddM said:
Quite possible Todd, but the use of the plural "cams" a couple times in the post had me wondering. I agree that it is not necessary in most cases to replace the cam gear, but I have seen a couple of pinion gears wiped from the use of a too large cam gear. In my opinion the use of the correct size gear is part of doing a professional job. I don't see much reason to cut corners unnecessarily. Just because you can get away with something doesn't mean that you should.........Bill
True. I think that the cam manufacturers assume that the buyer knows to check the lash and change the pinion gear to the proper size. I like to use a new pinion gear if the bike's owner wants it as quiet as possible. That way there are two new gears installed rather than using both old ones. A new pinion gear doesn't cost much.[/QUOTE]

It's a whole lot easier to press the old gear off the cam and install it on the new cam, don't you think? As long as the factory matched gears are in good shape I don't see the advantage in messing with the pinion as well........Bill
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
871 Posts
nauipro said:
True. I think that the cam manufacturers assume that the buyer knows to check the lash and change the pinion gear to the proper size. I like to use a new pinion gear if the bike's owner wants it as quiet as possible. That way there are two new gears installed rather than using both old ones. A new pinion gear doesn't cost much. It's a whole lot easier to press the old gear off the cam and install it on the new cam, don't you think? As long as the factory matched gears are in good shape I don't see the advantage in messing with the pinion as well........Bill
Yes, I can see your point. I guess it depends on what you have on hand and the condition of the parts.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top