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Discussion Starter #1
I know this has probably been discussed numerous times here somewhere and there are shops that will do it, but I'm kind of a do it myself kind of guy, has anyone polished their own rims, I can't imagine that it would be that difficult to do, just strip the polyurathane covering or what ever it is and buff them out, I figured you could sand on the ruff cast part thats in the center to get the ruff edges down then take a buffer to them, I did my fork lowers like that and they came out looking like chrome and it doesn't take much to keep them looking that way, figured this would be a good winter project. If anyone has done this let me know. Thanks

Mongo
 

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Try this click Here works like a chrome.

I use to know a old boy that lived right off the turnpike on Lee Rd in Lawton. I use to go down there to the Goodyear plant and his son was always hitting me up for dirt track tips for a old car he use to run.
 

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I tried polishing my aluminum car wheels myself a few yeara ago and it didn't work, I was told that you need a commercial type buffer to get enoufg heat and pressure. Not sure if thats true, though. Didn't do any damage, just gave uo and took em to a shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Sin

Thats pretty much what I did to my fork lowers, sanded them then buffed them, I've got a highspeed hand buffer that works good for that. figured doing the rims would be pretty much the same just take some effort. A good winter project. Thanks again.

Mongo
 
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I polished all the aluminum on a old CB750K using elbow grease and rubbing compound. It did cut through the poly coating and it only took one whole winter ... probably shoulda sprung for a buffer but I was young and broke.
 

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I've polished my aluminum valve covers and timing covers on my Goldwing over the last winter. They were heavily oxidized and pitted from being neglected. This is the process I used. First strip off any protective coating or paint. I used some heavy duty paint stripper from the hardware store. Then start sanding with 400 grit paper to get out any pitting or scratches. Some of the pitting was fairly deep and I used 300 grit to get that out. I worked my way up from 400 grit to 600 then 1000 and finished sanding with 2000 grit paper. After sanding I chucked up a high speed buffing wheel in my die grinder and used coarse then fine rubbing compound. If your part is in good condition you could probably skip most of the sanding. I finished buffing it with Mothers Aluminum Polish. This process worked very well and my covers now shine like fresh chrome. It takes a bit of elbow grease but the results are well worth it. They are easy to keep looking this way with just a little bit of TLC.
 

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If you know someone in a machine shop, get some Scotch Brite. You can make them look very shiny. But they will always need to be buffed up. Do not wax after you do it. The wax can get dull and or dirty and then they look crappy and need to be striped. Just use the Scotch Brite from time to time and they will look fine. It's the same time you would have spend in cleaning them.
 
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