V-Twin Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 6 hours of motorcycle practice over the past weekend, I felt like I'd reached a new plateau. My brakeless maneuvers with clutch and throttle control were better than ever. I made several perfect passes in a row through the offset cone weave. I was feeling pretty good about the progress.

Well, Tuesday evening I had some time. I set up some 12' cones and did some cone weaving. Hmmmm, it feels awkward all over again! I knocked some cones over with my saddlebags. My friend on his Honda Shadow 750 went through them effortlessly. It was his first time.

I set up an elongated figure eight with 18' diameter loops at each end. My friend had a little more trouble with those cause he kept looking down at the cones. Me? I did a little better; but still felt awkward. Ran over the exit cones several times. Then, I didn't clutch out of an over-lean situation and put my foot down. No problem except that I thought I was over that.

This weekend will consist of a couple of more sessions in the high school parking lot with cones. I guess that I wasn't quite at the plateau yet . . . just got a peek over the edge for an hour or two. I'm really obsessed with a desire to practice, practice, practice until perfection and confidence. I hated to see the skills diminish because of a couple of days off the bike.

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I know how you feel. I had this little safe route I took that I was very comfortable with. I took this route this everytime I made any adjustments to my bike too. The more you ride though the better you get.
 
G

·
The "rustiness" can definitely be frustrating. However, consider the fact that you're not merely riding the motor when you're doing the low-speed exercises, you're participating in an activity that requires a great deal of concentration, as well as eye-hand coordination, and a certain amount of exertion. Compare it to any other sporting activity, and you'll recognize that no matter how good you are, it's always going to take some warm-up to get back into your groove. As you improve, you'll find it's possible to go out an get through exercises that once seemed very challenging, with very little trouble, and no warm-up. However, even when you're at that point, you'll find that after a few runs through you'll become smoother.

Harris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh, I do . . . I do!

8-Ball said:
Get out of the parking lot and go for a ride... its okay.
Even though it sounds like all my riding is in parking lots, actually I ride in straight lines and battle traffic quite a bit, too. ;)
I ride the motor to work every day, take little rides to enjoy the countryside, and even go on overnight trips 2 or 3 times a year.

And of course, it's a couple of miles from my house to the parking lot.:duh?: :brows:

Ken
 

·
ORIGINAL DOOF BABE
Joined
·
3,954 Posts
Hey Ken! I've been keeping an eye on your posts of your progress through Harris' lessons. I just started looking at them myself now that I can ride again after my back surgery. Good for you for keeping it up!

After just READING the lessons I realized how badly I needed a refresher course. Part of me is scared to start the lessons 'cause I know I'll see just how bad I needed them! LOL!

I've felt for a long time that I was an OK rider but not as GOOD a rider as I should be - these lessons will give me the edge I think I've been looking for. Also, there's a big difference between taking a safety course 12 years ago on a small bike when I'd never ridden, and now having some experience and riding a huge Road King.

Keep up the good work and the feedback!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
871 Posts
Ken R said:
After 6 hours of motorcycle practice over the past weekend, I felt like I'd reached a new plateau. My brakeless maneuvers with clutch and throttle control were better than ever. I made several perfect passes in a row through the offset cone weave. I was feeling pretty good about the progress.

Well, Tuesday evening I had some time. I set up some 12' cones and did some cone weaving. Hmmmm, it feels awkward all over again! I knocked some cones over with my saddlebags. My friend on his Honda Shadow 750 went through them effortlessly. It was his first time.

I set up an elongated figure eight with 18' diameter loops at each end. My friend had a little more trouble with those cause he kept looking down at the cones. Me? I did a little better; but still felt awkward. Ran over the exit cones several times. Then, I didn't clutch out of an over-lean situation and put my foot down. No problem except that I thought I was over that.

This weekend will consist of a couple of more sessions in the high school parking lot with cones. I guess that I wasn't quite at the plateau yet . . . just got a peek over the edge for an hour or two. I'm really obsessed with a desire to practice, practice, practice until perfection and confidence. I hated to see the skills diminish because of a couple of days off the bike.

Ken
Keep practicing! It's better NOT to venture out into the world of idiot drivers until you are completely confident in your abilities. It's just not worth it.

Have you taken the MSF Basic Rider course yet? If not, then I'd strongly advise that you do ASAP! It may save your life! A friend of mine was killed about 3 years ago, just a couple weeks before she was supposed to take the class. She was on a sweeping (not sharp) right curve and drifted into the oncoming lane, right into the front end of a van at 50 mph. Her husband was following on his bike and couldn't do a thing to help. If she had gone through it already, she would have known about countersteering, and would most likely still be alive today. With that course, you will learn more in two days than you would in two years learning the hard way.

This is a perfect example of why new riders should start out on a smaller bike. A Harley is NOT a good choice for learning how to ride. There's just too much weight and torque to deal with while trying to learn all the basic manuevers. Every class I've instructed used enduros or those little <450 cc *** bikes. I've seen many potential riders (on big bikes) get frustrated and give up before getting to the point of taking the road test. It's tough to gain confidence this way. If you can learn to easily handle a small bike, then it's not as much of an adjustment when moving up to something bigger. It's much easier to learn on something that you know you can hold up if you start to fall over. The only classes where a large bike is used is the Experienced Rider Course, where the student brings his/her own bike.

I started riding on a mini-bike when I was 8 yrs old, a 350 Can Am when I was 12, then moved up to a Sportster when I was 16. -2$en#e-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,150 Posts
Ken R said:
Even though it sounds like all my riding is in parking lots, actually I ride in straight lines and battle traffic quite a bit, too. ;)
I ride the motor to work every day, take little rides to enjoy the countryside, and even go on overnight trips 2 or 3 times a year.

And of course, it's a couple of miles from my house to the parking lot.:duh?: :brows:

Ken
Ken... as long as there is balance... that is all I am concerned with. Me? I'm looking into a new typing tutor... I'm getting godawful sloppy and am sure I've lost a couple of WPM.
 
G

·
ToddM said:
Keep practicing! It's better NOT to venture out into the world of idiot drivers until you are completely confident in your abilities. It's just not worth it.

Have you taken the MSF Basic Rider course yet? If not, then I'd strongly advise that you do ASAP! It may save your life! A friend of mine was killed about 3 years ago, just a couple weeks before she was supposed to take the class. She was on a sweeping (not sharp) right curve and drifted into the oncoming lane, right into the front end of a van at 50 mph. Her husband was following on his bike and couldn't do a thing to help. If she had gone through it already, she would have known about countersteering, and would most likely still be alive today. With that course, you will learn more in two days than you would in two years learning the hard way.

This is a perfect example of why new riders should start out on a smaller bike. A Harley is NOT a good choice for learning how to ride. There's just too much weight and torque to deal with while trying to learn all the basic manuevers. Every class I've instructed used enduros or those little <450 cc *** bikes. I've seen many potential riders (on big bikes) get frustrated and give up before getting to the point of taking the road test. It's tough to gain confidence this way. If you can learn to easily handle a small bike, then it's not as much of an adjustment when moving up to something bigger. It's much easier to learn on something that you know you can hold up if you start to fall over. The only classes where a large bike is used is the Experienced Rider Course, where the student brings his/her own bike.

I started riding on a mini-bike when I was 8 yrs old, a 350 Can Am when I was 12, then moved up to a Sportster when I was 16. -2$en#e-
Todd,

While your advice is good, Ken isn't referring to the travails of a new rider. He is working on intensive low-speed drills. He's got some videos posted that are worth a look:

http://www.callairco.com/ken/

Harris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,981 Posts
I am impressed!, Been riding on the street for 40 years and no way I could do that perfect cone run that tight like he did! Not even close...

Guess I better get some cones and start practicing :(
 

·
Soar like an Eagle
Joined
·
2,570 Posts
Harris said:
Todd,

While your advice is good, Ken isn't referring to the travails of a new rider. He is working on intensive low-speed drills. He's got some videos posted that are worth a look:

http://www.callairco.com/ken/

Harris
Very impressive! That is a tight cones course, looks like fun. Makes me want to go ahead and do the advanced MSF course that they have at my HD dealer thru Riders Edge.
 
G

·
Road Glider said:
Very impressive! That is a tight cones course, looks like fun. Makes me want to go ahead and do the advanced MSF course that they have at my HD dealer thru Riders Edge.
RG,

You won't find those cone patterns, or exercises in the advanced rider's course.

Harris
 

·
fourty three and seven...
Joined
·
3,465 Posts
Very cool. That you ken?

Nice other videos in your link too.

Thanks for posting the link Harris.

Makes me want to sign up for the cop course my friend teaches.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top