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Discussion Starter #84
If not you have all the tools to do it again. Certainly not a skill I posses so I wouldn't even try it.
Yeah, and the nice thing is, striping paint (OneShot lettering enamel) dries SLOWLY. So if I F it up, I can wipe it off and try again.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
I just got my 49mm conversion trees in the mail yesterday. I need to order the tubes and a few other misc pieces before I can get that project going.

One thing I'm undecided on in that department: my current lower legs are chrome, which I like. The new ones, new take-offs, are clear coated aluminum. I'm thinking about installing them as-is (even with the stock reflectors, which I have always hated) or maybe painting them gloss black. I have some pretty tough, very shiny, single stage epoxy paint that I would use for that. I'm not sure how it will look with the black wheel. Might be too much black in that area??? Dunno.... that would mean black lower legs; chrome cowbells (though I could get black ones; need to order those); chrome nacelle. Thoughts?
 

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Depending on what type of garbage is in the metal (they are cast), you might be able to anodize them and dye a color. I've never tried fork legs, but 6061 is easy to handle in the sizes I machine.
used pool chemicals for the electrolyte (pH-), safer and easy to get. Use sodium hydroxide based drain cleaner to clean the aluminum before anodize. I used a small wall wort 15 volt DC power supply for those, but you'd need a bit more current for fork legs and of course a much larger tub. A couple gallons of distilled water and some RIT dye (or the expensive anodizing dyes from Caswell Plating if you want to do it right). Lots of information on the web to get you going. Let them "cook" until they take on a dull gray and they are ready for color. Probably ready a lot sooner, but that's what I've done. A big piece like this could probably use some kind of circulation pump, I'd have to look into this before suggesting a product. You want a non-contact pump like a peristaltic pump, but there should be others that can work too, maybe something for a large fish tank filter.

Also note that you better be sure the surface is prepped the way you want before anodizing, every little imperfection will show up after the dye soaks in. Must not be any non-aluminum in contact with the water or you get a short, and that's bad.

Also note that when you buy the drain cleaner the people at the counter may look at you like a drug dealer, it is used in making a few different illegal drugs so it can be hard to find on the shelves. There is a pool chemical (pH+) that almost works, but the lye is way faster to get clean metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Depending on what type of garbage is in the metal (they are cast), you might be able to anodize them and dye a color. I've never tried fork legs, but 6061 is easy to handle in the sizes I machine.
used pool chemicals for the electrolyte (pH-), safer and easy to get. Use sodium hydroxide based drain cleaner to clean the aluminum before anodize. I used a small wall wort 15 volt DC power supply for those, but you'd need a bit more current for fork legs and of course a much larger tub. A couple gallons of distilled water and some RIT dye (or the expensive anodizing dyes from Caswell Plating if you want to do it right). Lots of information on the web to get you going. Let them "cook" until they take on a dull gray and they are ready for color. Probably ready a lot sooner, but that's what I've done. A big piece like this could probably use some kind of circulation pump, I'd have to look into this before suggesting a product. You want a non-contact pump like a peristaltic pump, but there should be others that can work too, maybe something for a large fish tank filter.

Also note that you better be sure the surface is prepped the way you want before anodizing, every little imperfection will show up after the dye soaks in. Must not be any non-aluminum in contact with the water or you get a short, and that's bad.

Also note that when you buy the drain cleaner the people at the counter may look at you like a drug dealer, it is used in making a few different illegal drugs so it can be hard to find on the shelves. There is a pool chemical (pH+) that almost works, but the lye is way faster to get clean metal.
Wow! Sounds like a lot more work than painting! Lol!

Not overly productive today. Did a little hot work: heated and bent the pipe to correct muffler alignment with its hangar. Didn't take much. Muffler now lines up with the hangar perfectly, and the pipe contacts the support bracket fully. Put a pair of what I call "aircraft clamps" around the pipe and bracket and it's rock solid.

Also welded up the broken stub on the right rear crash bar. The one that holds the saddlebag support tube. Going to have to paint the repaired area, but it'll never show: I use the crash bar bags, which are awesome for quickly accessible things like gloves, etc. That will hide the repair. 20191029_161659.jpg 20191029_161646.jpg
I think I'm going to have to weld a piece on the lower edge of the bracket to better support the pipe. I couldn't get it to twist enough and keep the alignment right. As it is, the clamps are pulling down on the pipe. It's rock solid, like I said, but I think the clamps are introducing some stress that shouldn't be there.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
The latest work on my bike was to replace the Heli-Coil which had pulled out of one of the derby cover bolt holes with a Time-Sert. I removed the Heli-Coil, then drilled and countersunk the hole on mill; then tapped for the Time-Sert. The top few threads didn't look so hot, as these were what pulled out when the Heli-Coil pulled out (It didn't pull out fully; only the top half of it). This was my first time using a Time-Sert, and I expected that it would be a stronger insert than the Heli-Coil, since I had heard that they are superior.

Well, I got the primary cover all bolted up and torqued; then installed the derby cover and torqued it. And the top half of the Time-Sert pulled out.I hadn't realized before that the derby cover bolts are so short, but they only penetrate into the hole about 1/4". The top few threads looking not so hot prior to installing the Time-Sert allowed the bolt to rip the top half of the insert right off the rest of it - the inserts are pretty soft. I really should have torqued the derby cover with the primary cover still on the bench, which would have saved me from removing it again. I found a "Big-Sert" Time-Sert insert kit (that phrase has an awful lot of "serts" in it), which would have allowed me to drill a larger size hole and retain the 1/4-20 threads for the bolts. Had I found this in the first place, it's what I would have used. This is an expensive kit, $80 on Amazon. I paid $70 for the regular Time-Sert kit. If I bought the Big-Sert kit, that would be $150 spent on this primary cover; a new, chrome aftermarket one can be had for about that much.

I hunted on ebay and actually did find a used one in pretty decent shape, but decided to take mine to a welder friend of mine and see if he could TIG up the hole so I could start over again. He did - for free. So, now I have to mill the weld flat on the sealing surface of the derby cover gasket; and check for clutch clearance (Bandit Sportsman Clutch) on the inside and possibly grind the weld if needed. So I'm stalled there at the moment. The cover is set up on the mill table and is ready to go, but I haven't gotten down to the basement to work on it again since doing that.

I'm also delayed because of paint. This is kind of a stupid delay. The counterman at Hale's HD (which gives a 20% discount for phone orders) suggested when I ordered the quart of paint that I get the activator from my local supplier; that's what all the body shops local to them do. OK, no problem. Well, luckily, the local vendor knows his ****, and informed me that not all manufacturers' products like to play with other manufacturers' products. PPG is one of these. There is, of course, nothing indicating who the paint vendor is. I did some digging, and while I didn't find anything solid, several people seem to think PPG is HD's paint vendor. My local supplier doesn't carry PPG products, of course. There is another branch relatively nearby that does, however, so I have to go there to get activator and reducer, then mix some up and paint a test panel to make sure all is well with the PPG activator and reducer. Should have just bought the Harley activator.
 

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When you put the primary back together, can you install longer bolts in the derby cover so as not to pull out partial thread?
 

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Discussion Starter #90
Yeah, probably so. Have to go on Gardiner-Westcott's web page, or someplace similar and see about getting chrome, buttonhead screws. It's likely they'd need to be ordered long and cut to length.

I think part of the issue is that originally, the derby cover was sealed with an O-ring (or maybe a quad seal, I disremember, now for sure). The current method - which works much better - is a former coated metal gasket. This adds some thickness, reducing the thread engagement. Probably only by .020 or .030, but every little bit helps, I guess.

This bike does have 116,000 miles on it, so there have been MANY clutch adjustments and primary oil changes involving removal and installation of the derby cover. No doubt those few 1/4-20 threads got tired after a while...
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Got some shop time this weekend. Milled the welded hole in the primary cover flat, then drilled and tapped. Also had to the grind the inside of the same hole for clutch clearance, as it was welded from both inside and outside. The Bandit Sportsman clutch needs a little more room than the stocker. Installed the cover and test fired the bike, to make sure the starter wasn't bound - I've had this happen once in the past - the bike lit right off. Then I filled it with Spectro 80 gear oil (14 oz., as recommended by Bandit Machine Works) and buttoned it up, including the rider footboard. So just about everything on the left side is done (mechanically - paint not included).

Moved over to the right side and decided to do a better job with the fabricated exhaust bracket. I didn't like the gap between it and the pipe at the bottom. So, took it off and spent some more time with the torch, hammer and anvil, and got it to fit quite well. Then, I added a weld bead on the end of it, and ground and filed a hard corner to serve as a stop for the clamp. Just in case it tries to walk. Doubt that would happen, but now it can't unless the clamp really loosens up.

I have a front end upgrade in the works, but am waiting on HD for parts. Apparently, they had some issues with a server upgrade, so parts ordered from the factory are delayed.

Pix attached of the past couple days' activities.
The last couple of pix, of the installed exhaust bracket, are a little disorienting at first. They're taken from under the pipe, looking forward. 20191109_135917.jpg 20191109_135928.jpg 20191109_141539.jpg 20191110_172405.jpg 20191110_172416.jpg 20191110_172558.jpg 20191110_174208.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #92
I guess I should have posted the exhaust bracket pix in my "Improving Ultima 6-Speed" thread. Some kind of bracket needs to be dabbed when installing that gearset. This is my solution.
 

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Maybe I missed something here. Is it because you are using a Bandit clutch that you only need 14 oz of fluid? That isn't even half a quart and doesn't the stock primary on your bike take approx. a quart? Seems like some parts might not get enough lubricant.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
Maybe I missed something here. Is it because you are using a Bandit clutch that you only need 14 oz of fluid? That isn't even half a quart and doesn't the stock primary on your bike take approx. a quart? Seems like some parts might not get enough lubricant.
Yes, Bandit recommends 14 oz of Spectro Gold 80wt gear oil when running the Bandit Sportsman. The clutch ring gear slings oil around all over the place in there, everything gets plenty of lube. The Bandit doesn't want to be submerged in oil, just wet. The chain and sprockets are a lot happier in the light weight gear oil than they are in ATF, motor oil, or any of the other options. And gear oil is "sticky," so it clings to the chain and sprockets.

I was skeptical at first, when I first put this clutch in. But it works. I've had the clutch with this all-bore 107 for over 30,000 miles. Prior to that, I always used to get metal shavings on the magnetic drain plug from the compensator. Once I started running the gear oil, no more metal in the oil. 700 miles ago, I removed the compensator and replaced it with a solid motor sprocket, so comp wear is no longer an issue, but the rest of the primary parts like the gear oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #96
It's been a couple of months. I had major shoulder surgery 11/25, and spent the first few weeks of November trying to get some things wrapped up prior to being out of commission following the surgery. I'm 7 weeks out tomorrow, and while I still have a long way to go, I can work on my bike again.

I mentioned earlier in this thread that I got Motorcycle Metal's '14 and up 49mm conversion kit. I'm part way through getting that installed. That's going to be a nice upgrade. The top tree is BEEFY, and the much bigger 49mm tubes go all the way through it, and get clamped with a pair of pinch bolts on each tube. The bigger tubes plus the beefy upper tree are going to provide a LOT more stiffness and stability up front. I'm also installing Race Tech fork springs and Gold Valve 'emulators.' I had Ricor Intiminators (similar to the Gokd Valves) and RT springs in the 41mm front end and was quite happy with the improvement over stock that they provided. I'm expecting similar or better performance from the Gold Valves. Add to that the 49mm tubes and MM's beefy trees, and the front end should really perform.

I got the 2nd bag sanded and ready for primer yesterday. I did the lids and 1 bag prior to surgery. I'm planning to prime the bags today. I'll get color and a light coat of clear on them either later during the week or next weekend. Then I'll have to figure out how to mask the flames and get them painted. It's a fairly complex paint job. Luckily, I have one lid still intact, and both bags, at least where the flames are, are still intact enough to trace the flames.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
The RT Gold Valves require drilling the damper rod compression holes and adding more of them. The Gold Valves will do compression damping duties, and are adjustable (though they must be removed from the fork tubes to adjust, so that's a royal PITA and not something you want to do routinely). Drilling the damper rods disables the compression damping function of the damper rods, allowing the Gold Valves to do the job instead. 3 pairs of 5/16" holes are required to allow plenty of oil to flow without restriction. The stock compression holes are 1/4". There are only 2 holes, a single pair, and these are restricted by half by the so-called "oil lock piece" that the rod goes into before being bolted into the slider. Here are a couple pix of my drilling setup and a little of the drilling action. RT gives specific instructions on spacing of the holes, which I am following exactly.
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The 1st shot shows a centering 5/16 centering drill in a 3/4 collet. I have the mill table locked down so it can't move; and the centering drill has a 3/4" shank, so there's no flex there. This way, I can make sure the drill doesn't wanted off center, off the top of the tube, which it would definitely want to do unless I milled a little flat spot and/or center punched the hold prior to drilling. Center punch would definitely work; but I thought it would be fastest to do it this way, using the mill table's "x" axis adjustment to measure off the distance between holes without having to use layout fluid, measure, mark, punch, etc.

2and shot shows drilling through with a 5/16" drill in a 5/16" collet. This one's not going to wander using the top hole as a guide and the inside diameter of the damper rod.

The 3rd shows my setup to locate the 3rd pair of holes 90° from the first 2.
 

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Great info but I don't want people to get intimidated about drilling the holes. They are not as critical as motor oil orifices. They just need to flow the correct amount. If they are slightly off it won't affect anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #99
Great info but I don't want people to get intimidated about drilling the holes. They are not as critical as motor oil orifices. They just need to flow the correct amount. If they are slightly off it won't affect anything.
I probably should have said something like, "It's not necessary to be as precise as this, but..."


I hoped to get my bags in primer today, then finish drilling the 1st damper rod; drill the 2nd one; and put the sliders and tubes together. I didn't. I let the morning get away from me; and it took me all afternoon to get the bags and lids masked to prevent overspray from getting inside the bags and lids. By the time I got all that done, it was dinner time, and my shoulder was (is) killing me. I might have overdone it with my PT exercises this morning. So I called it quits for the night. I'm going to try to get some time during the week to get all that done. I should be able to do that.
 

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Great info but I don't want people to get intimidated about drilling the holes. They are not as critical as motor oil orifices. They just need to flow the correct amount. If they are slightly off it won't affect anything.
True, but when ya got the toys, you go ahead and use them.
 
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