V-Twin Forum banner

61 - 80 of 158 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #61
I bored the trans case today; installed and honed the bushings; pressed the bearings out of the swingarm and the new, "True Pivot" bronze bearings in. I would have reinstalled the swingarm, but I don't have the "blue marine grease" the instructions call for. I thought about using Never-Sieze, but decided to follow the directions instead.

As requested, I did make a (probably lousy) video of the process - three of them, actually, and figured out how to post them on YouTube. I will try to link to those videos here:
Swingarm Pivot Bore Repair Part 1
Swingarm Pivot Bore Repair Part 2
Swingarm Pivot Bore Repair Part 3
The swingarm axle had a LOT of play in the bore. The bore did not appear to be worn oblong, it still looked round, but WOW, what a lot of slop. This was DEFINITELY a needed repair. It would be far better to remove the case, bolt it to an angle plate on a milling machine, and bore it that way. The bore is definitely not 100% true. I know this because I could slide the axle into either side (after honing the right side) but could not get it through the other bushing. So I had to hone until I could get the axle through. This was tedious to prevent going too far (though, the kit comes with 10 bushings; if you screw up you can do over without much fuss). I stopped when I could JUST get the axle through and move it freely. It does not have any real detectable play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,303 Posts
Cool, I'll watch those later. Don't really care about quality or professionalism in the video craft, just want to see what you had to do in case I ever need to do the same. Hopefully I'm not the only one who will benefit from your work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #63
I got the swingarm all back together today. I decided to re-use the Sta-Bo bushings I've had in there for the past few years, despite Ron at TrueTrack saying they're not needed with the TruePivot kit. They certainly can't hurt anything being in there; and it seemed to me that they did make a noticable difference in stability when first installed. They're polyurethane and seem to have softened a little bit with 4 or 5 years of use. But I believe they'll add a bit of stiffness to the stock "donut" swingarm mounts. 20191017_162234.jpg 20191017_162238.jpg 20191017_162809.jpg

Pix show the Sta-Bo bushing installed (but without the swingarm bracket); the bushing itself; and the stock donut without the bushing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #66
Would it make sense to drill and tap for a zero fitting in the end of the transmission case so you can lube that pivot?
It makes sense in theory. But no matter where you put a grease zerk back there, it won't be very accessible. The tire or swingarm and fender will block access from behind or above. If you put it on the bottom of the trans case, it would be very difficult to access at best, and get full of crud from the road... I don't think it would be worth it.

That said, the bore in the trams case was very worn out. I assume it was a relatively good fit when new, probably the same as the fit now in the new bushings. It's definitely an area of heavy wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,303 Posts
There isn't a big enough boss to put in a sealed cartridge bearing is there?

The other idea would be to put in some set screws, the transmission doesn't need to pivot, the swingarm has bearings to pivot so clamping it in place should also work. Probably a very good reason why this isn't done, but I can't think of why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #68
I got the Baker +1 pan and True Track installed after work today. The True Track dogbone and pucks are well manufactured, fit the crossmember well, and should be rock solid. The link provided seems very solid; good quality sperical bearings, or so it seems. They are very snug. This design really does seem far superior to the Progressive type that uses the swingarm bracket. My only reservation about the design is that it relies on the 12 1/4-20 oil pan bolts to stabilize the swingarm and stop rear steer. But, of all the available options, the True Track with the Baker +1 pan with its built-in bolt boss to receive the TT's link seems to me like it has the best chance of being effective.
20191018_192729.jpg

Speaking of the Baker pan: it has cast-in baffles, and does not use the jerked-off, spring-loaded, plastic baffle that HD put in the pan originally. I am convinced that is a major improvement. Look at the wear in the bottom of my stock oil pan from the plastic baffle vibrating and moving around. Obviously, little aluminum bits have been circulating in my engine oil. And anyone else's who is still running a stock pan.
20191018_193336.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #69
Tomorrow, I'll put the primary back together, and see about fixing the rear tire that loses air. Then I can put the wheel on it and get started on the bodywork. Maybe after a road test... Well, not so fast: I need gear oil for the trans. Baker recommends Spectro 75-140, so that's what I'm going to use. Probably going to have to mail order that, I highly doubt I can get it locally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #70
I am also going to be upgrading the front end: it's getting Howard Messner's 49mm conversion. But I think I'm going to get the bike on the road before I change the front end. I want to ride it with the True Track and trans case repaired; then ride it with its new front end so I can experience the effects independently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #71
Today was not all that productive. I got the inner primary on; the starter jackshaft assembled; and the clutch and motor sprocket torqued, and that's about it. Doesn't sound like much; but I had to clean the RTV off the inner primary, trans case, and engine case. Clean the thread sealant and RTV from the inner primary's bolt holes and from the bolts. Ran every bolt through a die and scraped the goop off the shanks. Ran a tap through every primary cover bolt hole. Then bolted the cover to the inner to make sure all the bolts would tighten up without pulling the threads out. I thought I had one bolt hole that was going to need thread repair, but they all seem fine after running a tap through them. Watch: the last one will strip when I torque it.....

I decided to just keep the existing primary, even though it got scratched during the wreck. I've spent so much $ on upgrades, I need to save somewhere. And it's below the derby cover, so it's not all that visible. F it.

Had to go to Auto Zone for a new tube of Permatex Ultra Grey - what was left in the tube I had was hard as a rock. So I got engine oil while I was there (Mobil 1 V-Twin). Tomorrow, I'll fill the oil pan; fill the primary after I button it all up... and wait for the trans oil to show. It should arrive Monday.

Still gotta figure out where my rear tire leaks; fix that; and reinstall the rear wheel.

Then it's on to paint. I have to decide if I'm going to repaint the rear fender, which wasn't damaged in the crash, but has 2 chips and is the original paint. I think I am going to, but that makes that much more work. So I'll be sanding the new (used) bags and lids; fixing the paint on the tank, reclearing that spot; and then sanding the tank's clear, so I can add a red pinstrioe outline to the flames. Same with the front fender. Plus, the clear is lifting around the front fender's rivets. So I guess I have to sand all the way through the clear there. I have a feeling that's going to open up a big can of worms.

I am not an experienced painter, but have had some success with a couple projects lately, amd always wanted to do a custom flame job. So... I'm going to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
In my recent rebuild of the basket case Road King I was working on I had to do the same as you. Cleaned all the swarf and RTV goop out of all the threads. Put it all back together only to discover a couple of the 1/4-20 threads were questionable so it all came back apart. I mounted the inner primary in my mill and machined all the 1/4-20's for heli-coils. Got to clean everything again and put it all back together. Peace of mind now. As you know, even simple stuff takes time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #73
I mounted the inner primary in my mill and machined all the 1/4-20's for heli-coils....... As you know, even simple stuff takes time.
That's exactly what I was expecting to have to do to mine. It seemed OK when I test fit the cover, so hopefully it will be. The primary cover has a derby cover bolt hole that needs help. The bottom two bosses needed to ve "clearanced" for my Bandit clutch. So the bolt holes aren't as deep as the heli-coil inserts. I've heli-coiled most, if not all of the 5 derby cover bolt holes. But the lower left one, the Heli-coil insert sticks out a little bit above the primary cover surface.

I bought a Time-Sert kit with 3/8" long thread inserts. I plan to mount the cover on the mill and remove that heli-coil; counterbore for the time sert and install it flush. If it protrudes on the inside and looks like trouble for the clutch, I can mill it flush.

You're right, $hit like this is time consuming. That's why it costs so much to have a shop do this kinda stuff. Thank God I have the skills and equipment to do pretty much all my own work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,303 Posts
You're right, $hit like this is time consuming. That's why it costs so much to have a shop do this kinda stuff. Thank God I have the skills and equipment to do pretty much all my own work.
I'll keep that in mind when I get my primary opened up this winter, maybe we can work something out if I need any machining for stripped bolt holes. Since I have a small drip from the cover, I'm guessing I have a stripped hole. So many other things going on that I haven't even thought about putting mine on the jack yet, need to get going.

I have a small desktop mill, but way too small for anything like this, I don't think I could even get the primary secured to the small table to do this repair, and won't really want to do it with hand tools. But I have done helicoils by hand more than a few times, never used timeserts yet but understand that under many conditions they are a better choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,485 Posts
Let's see N.E. so you stuck up there and you really a red neck in disguise. Where are you approximately? No one wants anyone to know precisely unless they buddies. Like Buffalo Bob and Norm once I receive their addresses I can see their property on Google although my plan is to actually go to where they live someday.
I get to the point eventually after reading this thread thus far not understanding most of what you are doing if I ever total a bike I want to bring it to you to repair. I am not a mechanic, but I have lots of money, because I am a cheap sumbitch and we are enjoying the fruits of our labor during retirement.

Sent from my moto e5 supra using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #76
I'll keep that in mind when I get my primary opened up this winter, maybe we can work something out if I need any machining for stripped bolt holes. Since I have a small drip from the cover, I'm guessing I have a stripped hole. So many other things going on that I haven't even thought about putting mine on the jack yet, need to get going.

I have a small desktop mill, but way too small for anything like this, I don't think I could even get the primary secured to the small table to do this repair, and won't really want to do it with hand tools. But I have done helicoils by hand more than a few times, never used timeserts yet but understand that under many conditions they are a better choice.
This will be my first time using a Timesert also.

We can definitely make something happen if you need to as far as shop repairs go.

Let's see N.E. so you stuck up there and you really a red neck in disguise. Where are you approximately? No one wants anyone to know precisely unless they buddies. Like Buffalo Bob and Norm once I receive their addresses I can see their property on Google although my plan is to actually go to where they live someday.
I get to the point eventually after reading this thread thus far not understanding most of what you are doing if I ever total a bike I want to bring it to you to repair. I am not a mechanic, but I have lots of money, because I am a cheap sumbitch and we are enjoying the fruits of our labor during retirement.

Sent from my moto e5 supra using Tapatalk
Not really all that well disguised....... Where am I? On the outskirts of the Pines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #77
Been busy with work and waiting for a few things to arrive, one of which is a tire tub, so I could figure out where my rear tire was leaking air. That arrived yesterday, and the tire got dunked today. The bead was leaking all around the pulley side. I broke the bead off just that side, and cleaned up the sealing area of the rim (which had a layer of rubber on it, preventing a good seal with the tire); and also the tire bead using pretty aggressive Scotch Brite; then vacuumed all the crud, and reseated the bead. Then dunked the tire again: No leaks. Put the wheel back on

I also had been waiting for a clutch adjusting screw to arrive from HD, which it did. Unfortunately, dumbass forgot that the Bandit Sportsman clutch uses its own adjusting screw. It's longer than stock; and also smaller diameter. So I wasted $7 and a week waiting for this damned thing. Gotta call Bandit Machine MOnday and get a screw on the way. Then I can button up the primary. That's really more part of the transmission project thread, but it applies here, too.

I had been going around in my head about maybe going for the CCE Tour Trac triple trees, but ultimately decided to upgrade to the 49mm front end using conversion trees from Motorcycle Metal. That will probably be its own thread also, since it's an upgrade rather than part of the repairs. I'm expecting that to be a significant improvement. A side benefit of doing that is that my '52 Pan project gets a front end. I'll need to get trees, but the 41mm tubes will go right in Hydraglide trees.

I'm working on fixing the tank paint. Got the black pinstripes touched up, and brushed on enough clear to fill the chipped areas higher than the surrounding area. Tomorrow will wet sand the high spots and hopefully the repair more or less disappears. I'm going to add a thin, red pinstripe to border the thick, black, pinstripes, so I will wet sand the entire tank and front fender; add the stripe; then re-clear. .Of course, I still have to sand and paint the new (used) bags with the base color. I really should get my ass in gear and do that soon, so I don't have to worry about building a fire in the garage wood stove to warm it up enough to paint.... It's still pretty warm here, and I could be painting. Maybe I"ll start wet sanding them tomorrow. That shouldn't take long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,723 Posts
This will be my first time using a Timesert also.
Did my first one last year for an exhaust stud. Just follow directions and it's a piece of cake.

Sent from my SM-A102U using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: n.e.confederate

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Discussion Starter #80
I'm waiting for the clutch adjusting screws, which is holding me up from putting the primary cover on; so I started sanding parts in preparation for paint. Got the 2 bag lids all sanded to 600 grit (wet sanded). I'll get started on the bags themselves this week. They'll get primed with epoxy primer, then lightly sanded and then the Luxury Rich Red base coat. But, I have some sanding to do on the front fender, too. The clear is lifting around the fender bracket rivets. I hope that doesn't mean that the rivets are getting loose.

I also fixed the chips in the tank's paint. I'm very happy with how that turned out. The whole tank will get wet sanded next; pinstripes added to the flame job; and then re-cleared.
 
61 - 80 of 158 Posts
Top