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I posted this question a few years back but thought I would readdress it since some time has passed. The problem My stock 2009 FLHT at around 46k needed the Compensator sprocket replaced. It was replaced by HD with the Screaming Eagle Comp (out of warranty I might add). Everything was fine till about 48K and running down the freeway. I had a loss of power and by the time I figured out what was going on and got off the freeway the motor was overheated to the point where my oil temp gauge was pegged at 350 degrees. The engine smelled burnt.

Harley determined that the crankshaft had shifted which cause the failure of the motor. The engine was completely rebuilt by HD dealer (of course not under warranty) and is still running fine at 96k.

My original question can the replacement of the compensator sprocket have any connection to the crankshaft failure? I know there is some serious torque applied to the sprocket could this cause the crankshaft to shift a few thousandths?
Thanks for any input.
 

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If the proper procedure was used to lock the primary drive during removal and reassembly, I don't see how it could. I may be wrong but that's my opinion based on principle and not a ton of hands-on experience like Therm or tt.
 

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If you use and impact gun on the comp bolt, you can scissor the crank. But it would be right then, not later.

As for your issue, a scissored crank can eventually damage the oil pump. But with cranks from that period, applying the blame to some other work preformed would be a stretch. Lots of those cranks slipped. Fact is, that it was probably sprocket shaft runout that killed the original comp, and the people doing the repair didn't check it. Harley never told anyone to check it, it was people in the aftermarket who figured that out.
 

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I have a very early 07 Dyna with over 101,000 miles on it. Recently did a 105" top end job and replaced the compensator with a Vulcan Engineering solid motor sprocket. I checked right n left crank run-out (0.001) so figured if it lasted this long, why not. Best way to ruin yer crank is using an impact gun and you would know it right away, not down the road.
 

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Tell me how you can scissor crankshaft with impact gun? No way!
 

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Tell me how you can scissor crankshaft with impact gun? No way!
Its a function of how an impact gun works. Now to be clear, I'm talking about scissoring the crank. Not vertically miss-aligning the wheels. And we already know that cranks that scissor have loose or less tight pin fits.

The impact gun causes the flywheel to vibrate, while it applies twisting force. And this only affects the one wheel. So it acts like a vibrator used for moving heavy equipment, or an air powered screw breaker.

Now to be sure, this is not going to happen every time. And your little run of the mill 1/2 inch impact is prolly not going to cause it. But if you hammer on it with a larger gun, or even a stout half inch gun, it can drift the wheel. And the longer you hammer on it, the more likely it is to happen.

The safe way is to heat the nut or bolt first, to soften the Locktite, and then use a hand bar to break it loose. Once you break it loose, I would think it was safe to run it out with the gun.
 
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