V-Twin Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I could really use some collective wisdom here...

2000 FLHTPI

I recently got this bike on the road. It had a dead battery which I replaced. After replacing the battery, I saw that the voltmeter was working and registering 14 volts or so when running, which gave me the confidence that the bike was charging properly.

Launched out on a two week 4200 mile ride and for the most part the bike performed flawlessly. I installed a radio before I left and when I was on the road I noticed that occasionally when I'd use the turn signals the radio would cut off, then restart. I used the cigarette lighter lead to wire up the radio (thinking it would run off the accessory circuit), and I figured maybe I overloaded the circuit or something causing the radio to cut out when the tun signals were used (and I figured I deal with it when my trip was over.

On the last day of my trip, the radio would cut out with every use of the turn signal and I noticed that the voltmeter was holding steady BELOW 12 volts. I rode the bike safely to my driveway and when I went to restart it the next day the battery had been drained completely down.

I haven't inspected the fuses yet nor have I done a diagnostic on the charging system of voltage regulator. Any ideas or past experiences where the problem may lie so I can focus appropriately?

Luckily this became an issue literally on the last day of a dream trip!

Thanks for any advice!
 

·
Infidel
Joined
·
1,428 Posts
Stator/Rotor...the 2000 Touring bikes had problems, mismatched parts. Common problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
637 Posts
Yep!!!

That year was a $hit charging system. They usually go when your in traffic and it overheats. Go to the manual:RTFB: it will walk you through the tests. I didn't and spent $100 on a regulator I didn't need. My stator fried w/ 1900 mls. on my bike and the stealer charged me $300 to replace it because I was 3 months passed my warr.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for all the feedback. I'll walk through the charging sstem flow chart tests when I get back home.

I was in a fair amount of traffic on my trip and the failure did occur after dealing with some long lane splitting/stop and go traffic outside of San Francisco so maybe there's a connection.

So if the 2000 charging system was crap, when I replace the stator/rotor wil the new parts be any better than the old or is this problem I'm likely to face in the future again?

Also, any special tools needed to replace the stator/rotor? I seem to recall some sort of bolt on tool to pull the stator.

Thanks again for all your help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
More info

BTW.. saw this in my searches.. thought it might help others.. from:

http://www.pvc.maricopa.edu/~preston/29987-99a.html

If you have a fuel injected touring or police model made between 1999 and Jan. 2001 beware. If your charging system hasn't gone belly up, it may sooner than you expect. The problem is that the stator used is for a 38 amp system, these bikes have a 45 amp system. How'd they do that? They put a beefier rotor with stronger magnets over the same stator used on both the 38 and 45 amp systems. The inevitable result is higher temperatures produced by the higher output which will kill the windings on the stator.

Harley is well aware of this problem since they put out a new upgraded stator (part #29987-99A) and Service Bulletin M-1111 explaining the problem. No there's no recall on this but if you have to change your stator, make sure you keep all your receipts just in case. What's worse is that H-D is still selling a kit to convert the 38 amp to the 45 amp with, you guessed it, the bigger rotor while you re-use the inadequate stator.

The so-called "New & Improved" stator... It appears to have thicker wire and a neater job on the windings. Replacing the stator isn't hard if you follow the repair manual and have the right tools.

You will also need to replace your Main circuit breaker, it is a 40 amp in these models, and when upgrading your stator to a 45 amp system will cause an open circuit at some point causing a "quit while riding" situation. The main breaker needs to be upgraded to a 50 amp.

The three service bulletins are M-1111 and M-1151, M1151-A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
One more issue

In reading the service bulletins referenced above, they also state that the charging circuit could be interuppted by oil leaking from the primary chain case which gets into the connector between the stator and the voltage regulator.

My bike had been throwing of some oil from under the pan due to a bad seal on the oil or transmission plug, causing the bottom to become pretty wet.

Naturally I'll inspect this when I get back to my bike but I'm curious if anyone else experienced a charging failure due to the routing of the wiring near the primary chain case (and dripping oil). Evidently another service bulletin covers a recommended rerouting of the wiring to prevent this from happening.

Also, it seems that the 40 to 50 amp circuit breaker recall (not bulletin/recommendation) implies that I might be able to get at least a bigger circuit breaker covered by a recall. Maybe they'll cover the stator too if it's fried! Wishful thinking!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top