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Discussion Starter #1
Any one else have trouble with icing when the temp drops below 40 degrees? I have been having trouble BAD for the last week when temps are below 40, only in the morning, ride home from work is fine. I have the high flow aircleaner kit, could that contribute to the problem?
 

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Here's a little info on carb icing. And yes, the more open SE air cleaner setup is more suspectible to it than the stock setup. The amount of humidity also has a lot to do with it. You could always try some type of breathable covering and see what happens.

You cannot have carburetor ice below 32º F because there is no
moisture (relative humidity) in the air. Any moisture in the air at
32ºF and below is in a solid (ice) form as sleet or snow.

There are 3 types of icing.
1. Fuel vaporization ice: This is the most common and occurs
when fuel changes state from a liquid to a gas. It is common to a
temperature drop of up to 70ºF as fuel robs the temperature of the
induction air to change state. Fuel vaporization ice can occur at
ambient temperatures as high as 100ºF and humidity as low as 50
percent. It is more likely, however, with temperatures below 70ºF and
relative humidity above 80 percent. The likelihood of icing increases
as the temperature decreases down to 32ºF and as relative humidity
increases.
2. Impact Ice: This is where snow or sleet freezes to you air
filter element and causes blockage of the induction air to the
carburetor.
3. Throttle Ice: Is formed on the rear side of the throttle
valve when the throttle valve is partially closed. This rush of air
around the throttle valve forms a low-pressure area and has a cooling
effect on the fuel-air mixture. Moisture freezes in the low-pressure
side (back side) of the throttle valve. This ice can accumulate and
restrict the income fuel-air mixture and cause an engine power loss
by loss of manifold pressure. Throttle ice seldom occurs above 38ºF.
 

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0043--Licensed to Doof!
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I ride year round with temps in the teens and 20's in the AM. Carb spits sometimes if I haven't dropped the jet size but I've never had icing. I live in NJ near the shore, so there's always some reletive humidity.
 

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Longtime Asphalt Cowboy
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Geezer-Glide said:
I ride year round with temps in the teens and 20's in the AM. Carb spits sometimes if I haven't dropped the jet size but I've never had icing. I live in NJ near the shore, so there's always some relative humidity.
I'm with Geezer on this one. I ride year round and even did so while I was living in the Chicago area (5 years). Bike was parked out side when I lived in the Lincoln Park area and I NEVER experienced "icing" issues with my bike. I ran a CV carb and am now running a MiKuni on my '96 Evo. I've ridden in temps down to around 10 degrees up and around 34-35 degrees and have never experienced this.

DDuess, I lived in Issaquah and Redmond for nearly 10 years...bought my Evo from Eastside. Never had that problem....

Moved back home to Texas 3 years ago and despite what some people might think, in the Panhandle of Texas we get snow (over 25" last year) and it gets damn cold. If it's dry, I ride...give a damn what the temp is.

Ya know there's one rule I've always lived by in my 50+ years of riding...feel the heat before you leave. I always feel some heat in my cylinder heads before I leave.

o~\o
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I guess that I will have to warm it up a little before I go. Normally as soon as it will take throttle and idle I go. The weather has been mid to lo 30's and ~99% rel. humidity. On a cold dry day it is fine.
 
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