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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some more help from the great people on this forum!

Have a 2003 EG FLHTCI. I repaired the fairing brackets about 25K miles ago. Got that familiar rattle and vibration on one side of the batwing during the last ride. Removed the fairing today expecting to find another broken bracket. WRONG…the plastic mounting post is cracked on one side and broken completely off on the other. At least there are no other cracks in any of the vertical or speaker brackets and no broken tabs.

Thinking that I did not get a good alignment on the brackets upper tabs when I repaired the brackets last time. So over time a small amount of continuous side pressure from the screws along with all the typical vibation resulted in post cracking. At least that’s what it looks like now. Hindsight is such a wonderful thing :)

After looking around the forum I have a couple of questions –

GLUE -- Many on here are big fans of using J-B Weld to re-glue the mounting post back on. The fairing is ABS plastic (I believe) so I’m looking at J-B Weld 50132 PlasticWeld Quick-Setting Epoxy or J-B Weld 50133 Plastic Bonder Structural Adhesive. Leaning toward the 50132 because it claims to be more of a plastic weld that is good for ABS. What have any of you used successfully?

ANOTHER POSSIBLE FIX -- Thinking about simply drilling through the inner panel where the existing mounting post is and then bolt everything together using a black SS tress head bolt and nylon lock nut. Would glue the post back in place then insert bolt through the panel, screw it through the post, install the bracket and secure it on the inside with nylon locking nut. Would use black SS washer and rubber washer to spread the stress out on the outside of the inner panel area without making things look like too much of a kluge. Would also just snug things carefully to make sure I didn’t crack anything during reassembly. Won’t get any car show points for the fix, but it would hold the inner fairing pretty securely. Not sure that a small truss head would look too bad on the inner panel compared to the rubber odometer reset button.

Attached a couple of pictures of what I’m facing. Removed the post and bracket repair kit piece in the picture to make things easier to see. The blue tape is in the general area where the bolt head would be if using that fix. Because both sides are damaged, I would use bolts on both sides so there would be some symmetry. Yes the best fix would be a complete replacement of the inner panel but finances just won’t allow that right now.

Looking for success stories for those that have fixed cracked posts on the inner fairing. What glue/epoxy did you use? How long has it held? Also welcome any comments on possible bolt fix. What have I overlooked? Thanks.
 

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I'd go with "another possible fix". I have an '01 FLHTCI that had the same affliction. I repaired it 15 years ago using your fix mentioned above. I used washerhead 10-32's with nylon nuts on a custom fit sistered bracket of perfect length to alleviate any induced stress on the bracket to the fairing. That was key, I think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Gave the repair some more thought last night. Not trying to over think things, but looks like I’ll go with the “another possible fix" option especially considering Wideyes success with the same style fix.

Will glue the post back in place using the original J-B Weld and will also re-enforce the cracked side gussets using some fiberglass drywall tape set in epoxy. Probably overkill because the through bolt will take most of the load but I figure a little re-enforcement for the post is not a bad thing!

Planning to insert a ¼-20 bolt through the front of the inner fairing and then screw it through the insert that’s still in the post. This hopefully will strengthen the post connection to the fairing so the repair is not 100 percent dependent on the J-B Weld epoxy. The end of the bolt will stick out enough to put the sister bracket on and then secure everything with a nylon locking nut. Should pull things together nicely and distribute the stress and load. The attached picture shows the basic assembly. Will use a different bolt and washers but it gives a general idea of the repair. Sometimes a picture is worth 1000 words even if the graphic is crappy!

Yes, the bolt heads will show on left and right sides of the panel. This bike is a daily rider that’s been up and down the Alaska Highway…so it already has its share of road rash 😌 Cold weather hit just in time, so now I can do a little wrenching on the motorcycle and not worry about wanting to ride....burrr 🥶

Thanks Wideyes for your feedback on the repair. Other comments welcome!
 

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25 years ago I glued the left side of a Goldwing faring with a tube goes in a caulking gun that farmers use to patch plastic fertilizer tanks. The bottom 8" of the faring broke off after doing donuts on a 1200 GW when I was much younger. I laid the bike on the right side blocking the piece in a jiggarigg fashion until the glue set. This was definitely a 12 pk Natural Light day. It dried hard as a preachers **** at baptism time and I still see the bike occasionally at a gas station she was a good one.
 

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scratch it up real good...sterilize it... and jb weld(big blob) spread out too... with nut or bolt of some sort in there....may be an easy fix...oh and a decal or ride pin on the front...wallaa!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
scratch it up real good...sterilize it... and jb weld(big blob) spread out too... with nut or bolt of some sort in there....may be an easy fix...oh and a decal or ride pin on the front...wallaa!
I have never used J-B Weld before so I mixed a small batch and am testing it on the inside of the fairing. Sanded a small test spot, as you mentioned, to help make sure the epoxy gets a good bond. Will let it setup for 24 hours to see how it bonds and hopefully I get also an idea how tough it is. Need a good bond not only to secure the broken post, but to embed the fiberglass drywall tape gusset reinforcement into. Guess I’m “lucky” the entire post broke off so I don’t have to mess with trying to glue a nut in place.

Hear nothing but good things about JB Weld on the forum. If J-B Weld doesn't test out, I'm thinking about trying Oatey Black Abs Cement available at most big box stores. They claim the black cement solvent welds ABS. Wonder if anyone has used this on Harley fairings before?

Will admit that the chemical magic of the various glues and epoxies amaze me!
 

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The prices of the various glues will give you a hint of how good they are. JB Weld will crack when you are 600 miles from home and if you think sanding it smooth is hard try sanding it all off to try something else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
The prices of the various glues will give you a hint of how good they are. JB Weld will crack when you are 600 miles from home and if you think sanding it smooth is hard try sanding it all off to try something else.
Is there one glue (other than the one that "dried hard as a preachers **** at baptism time"..ha..ha) that you would recommend?

So far the test with J-B Weld is not very impressive :( Maybe others can jump in with recommendations too!
 

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You need to scrape some good grooves(bucknife) in all directions on the surfaces so the glue/jb weld will grab hold... not just sand the surface ...then it wont release...and at least 24 hrs to cure...longer the better
 

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There is also adhesion promoters (epoxy primer) that you can put on to increase adheasion. Hysol EA 9394 is an aluminum filled epoxy that has high temperature rating, once cured, it is there forever.
 
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We use to put Sealtec (spelling?) on plywood boats to seal cracks usually around the transom. The whole boat could rot away and the Sealtec would still be there. These days I use it to seal the bow where I anchor close to an oyster bar with a chip appearing in the gel coat. Better make sure the patch is smooth, because once it sets it is there for eternity.

Yes I know the top isn't level. Buffaloguy sent this to me for free and after some new straps it sits level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks captainhook455 -- the search continues 🔍

J-B Weld (original epoxy) is a fail on the test. Does not bond well to the inside of the inner fairing. Funny thing...the way I plan to do the repair the broken post will be more of a spacer than a mounting point. The bolt will run all the way through the front panel, through the post and into the fairing bracket. Just trying to get what support I can out of the broken post by gluing and re-enforcing the broken gussets.

Fear that over time the front panel will crack around bolt head. Trying very hard to make sure the alignment of everything is exact so there is no side pressure on anything...just straight through clamping pressure to the bracket. I'm sure I did not get things aligned well when I repaired the bracket before and that's what caused the post to break off along with plenty of Harley vibration :oops: Not complaining, one bracket repair in almost 20 years isn't too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did the hundred fifty bucks or so on eBay for a new Chinese inner or you can do a long screw with a big washer painted black
Garreye - nice looking ride. Can see why you did the replacement panel. My old daily rider will probably get the long bolt and washer repair. Was just hoping to find an adhesive that might help keep the broken post attached to the faring, not to really take the load...long bolt will take the load. Heard from a few people that used the bolt fix and it looks like it holds up pretty well without additional panel cracking.

Thanks for the input!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I’m posting this as a follow up for those who might be looking for a method to repair a broken inner fairing support post. Retested J-B Weld Original epoxy and decided to use it for the repair. I chose to re-enforce all the epoxy repairs with fiberglass tape and use the “bolt through” the front panel idea mentioned above to take the stress and load. This way the repair does not depend completely on the strength of the plastic parts and epoxy.

Day 1 -- First step was to simply epoxy the broken piece back in place on the inner fairing. It was easy to hold the broken piece in place because I drilled a small hole through the front panel and ran a long small bolt all the way through the post. The bottom of post molding on the inside of the panel allowed me to accurately drill the hole. Used washers and a nut and then tightened the bolt to hold things together. Let the epoxy cure overnight.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread
Wheel Tire Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle


Day 2 -- Used a small etching bit (small ball bit) in my trusty Dremel and carefully enlarged the area along the cracks in each gusset and post. This gives the epoxy more area to ensure a good “grip” for binding to the plastic. Cleaned everything with alcohol, dried everything with compressed air, and then applied epoxy along the etched cracks and let it cure overnight. The long small bolt and nut held everything secure during all the etching and epoxy application.

Day 3 -- Took small etching bit and roughed up large areas around the cracks and on the gussets and remaining post material. Cut pieces of stick on drywall fiberglass tape shaped and sized to cover the roughed up areas and cracks, cleaned and dried areas again, and then coated them with epoxy. This basically embedded the fiberglass in the epoxy to give the repair more strength. Let epoxy cure overnight.

Day 4 -- Roughed up the epoxy again and applied a final coat of epoxy to make sure all of the fiberglass patches were securely embedded in the epoxy. You can tell from the finish that I’m not an auto body repair type but it should get the job done!

Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Alloy wheel


Used ¼-20 x 2 ½ inch button head allen bolts inserted through holes drilled in the front panel. The bolt screws through the threaded insert that’s still in the post. The bolt is not screwed all the way through in the picture above. The insert has ¼-20 threads.

The front panel has a slope to it so I cut some angled spacers out of nylon spacer stock so the tension on the bolt spreads evenly on the front panel when the bolt is screwed through the insert that’s still in the repaired post piece.

Speedometer Vehicle Plant Bookcase Odometer
Water Liquid Automotive lighting Fluid Automotive tire


Placed a washer on the back side of the post and secured it with a ¼-20 nut using a small amount of blue locktite. Placed the angle bracket I had previously fabricated to repair the broken factory brace on the bolt and secured it using a nylon lock nut. The bracket is held between these two nuts. The nuts are “jammed” and secured with locktite so this should secure the bracket regardless of the vibration (fingers-crossed). The angle bracket is secured to the factory bracket with two bolts and nylon locknuts through holes drilled in the factory bracket. I carefully aligned everything to try and eliminate any side loads on the bolt and plastic pieces.

Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Bicycle tire Automotive lighting
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive tire Automotive exterior Automotive lighting


Also included the picture of the front panel with the bolts and inserts so everyone can see what it looks like. I’m okay with the look. Hopefully this approach places very little load on the plastic mounting post. The goal was to transfer the stress and load to the bolt that is placed through the panel, screwed through the insert inside the post, and on to the heavy duty angle bracket. Only time will tell if the repair will hold.

I did a similar repair on the left side mounting post. That post was just cracked so it was an easier fix. The left side also has the newer redesigned bracket from H-D. The tab has not broken on the new design so I did not need to fabricate an angle bracket. Still chose to use the “bolt through” the front panel approach along with using re-enforced fiberglass patches and epoxy so the panel looks uniform, but more importantly, so it has the additional strength on that side.

Maybe this will help some else that might be facing the same repair.
 
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