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Discussion Starter #1
Picked up my '02 Fatboy last week, and I love it. OK, so I'm a newbie! Have about 100 miles on it now. The manual says to keep it at 2000 to 2500 rpms for the first 500 miles, but there's no tach so I'm trying to guide myself by the sound of the engine. Any advice out there concerning what's important during the break in period?
Also, I want to keep the bike clean, of course. It looks pretty spotless after riding the first 100 miles. Should I be washing it anyway, or just wait til it begins to look dirty?
 

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If you read the owners manual there is a part that tells you what speed in each gear is more or less what rpm, or there used to be.
I would up the rpm recommendations at least by 500 rpm. The absolutely worst thing you can do to these bikes is lug the engine, and 2000 rpm in 5th gear is definitely lugging.

Up to you how often you wash the bike, but excessive washing causes more problems then it solves. Ideally you would give the bike several coats of a good polymer wax, and you will see it stays clean much longer, for months sometimes, unless you get caught in rain. Never wipe it down dry with a rag either, you will see minor scratches much more on a dark bike, use one of those car dusters with a handle and red hair from WalMart.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I like to downshift when braking. Think I should go easy on that during the first 500 miles?
On cleaning, any problem with soaping and spraying off the engine parts?
 

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Not a problem, within reason.

Personally I almost never downshift into 1st gear unless the bike is almost stopped, and only now and then into 2nd, but in the higher gears do it all the time. No particular reason other then that's how I ride and see no point in putting shockloads on the bike.
During anything resembling an emergency stop you are better off just using the brakes with the clutch pulled in and there is less chance to lock the rear.

No problem using soap and water, as long as it is some decent car wash soap. They have some Blue Coral car wash concentrate at WalMart that's a couple of bucks for a gallon, but any will do. Use a leafblower to dry it, the black engine paint waterspots easy and is a bitch to clean. If you have to they sell some S100 stuff in a red spay can that covers the water spots nicely.
 

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Cleaning.

nyaz2000,

The cleaning is ok, but get some good stuff on the paint like HIPPO
suggested , then clean to your heart's content, but not DRY CLEAN.
Down shifting is fine, but you could save some time in a panic type situation and just brake with the clutch in. You got enough to do with that
when some flat head pulls out in front of you anyway.
Now that it is broke in and clean, get out and ride.

Ride Safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hippo and Roadking96:
Thanks for the advice. I'm sure this is a stupid question, but when you talk about giving the bike several coats of polymer wax, is that limited to the paint (eg.-gas tank & fenders)?
 

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Cleaning & Polishing

nyaz2000,

You can polish the chrome and other non- ferrous metals, plastic ,when you do your spiffing up the scooter. Just make sure that you get everything that is exposed to the elements. It will become 2nd nature to you as you maintain your motor. It sounds like you got all the bases covered, now just get in there and do what needs to be done and enjoy the ride.


Ride Safe.
 

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Congrats on the new Scoot.

I will agree with Hippo, DON'T LAG THE ENGINE. The rest of it is ride it like you intend to ride and it will be fine.

Re: Cleaning / Upkeep "Looks"

http://www.auto-ease.com/

My personal opinion is this is as good and simple as it gets. I coat mine once a year and ride in Texas. Range is 25 degrees to 108. The products put out by Liqi-Teq are at the very least as good as ANY other.

Application and use are clearly defined and if ya follow their "procedures" you will have YEARS of beauty in your baby.

Hell, Buy the "bucket" ya won't be dissapointed. Check their site out, read up on it and go from there. If you intend to keep the bike sharp, you cannot go wrong with this stuff.

If someone blasts ya for asking what they think is a stupid question ta Hell with em. One of the aspects of riding is the commitment to pass on knowledge in order to preserve the love of the wind and pass it on.
 

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One quick comment on breaking with the transmission. Don't do it! A really great idea on cars and trucks but sucks for motorcycles. The transmission on your car or truck is bigger than your whole engine on your Harley. Your transmission is just a tiny thing and a heck of a lot more expensive than break pads! Brakes on the new Harleys are really good. Use them and if you change the tranny fluid evertime you change your crankcase oil, it'll outlast your engine. Yea I know what the manual says but it only holds a quart. By the way change that primary while you are at it, honestly it'll be dirtier than the tranny fluid.

Hope this helps. Ride safe and God Bless

Hoghead4ic
 

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Dry off yer bike with a leaf blower! That's the coolest idea I have never heard! Thanks, I'll have to try that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Actually, I used the leaf blower last weekend, and still had some water spots. Mebbe I should be partially drying with rags before using the blower?
 

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After.

Go to Chandler and pick up some of the blue microfiber cloths they have in the parts display. Best thing since sliced bread. No more swirlmarks if you use them once and throw them in with the laundry (not the drier).
 
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